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jmccr8

Tomb of the Doctor of Pharohs found

118 posts in this topic

I just came across this article and hadn't seen it posted here and didn't know where else to put it.

Dig unearths 4,000 year old tomb of doctor to pharaohs

This following link is to an article that is a year old but I thought I would add it as well as it is from the same period in ancient Egypt

Pharaonic princess's tomb found near Cairo, Egypt (Update)

jmccr8

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An interesting find, jmccr8. It's always important when archaeologists can add to our understanding of medicine in ancient Egypt, especially in the Old Kingdom. I was looking for better photos of the inscriptions and found a slightly more detailed one here. I'll post the photo:

n_56674_4.jpg

I was hoping to find the mention of doctor (swnw or a variant), which is attested in the Old Kingdom, but I don't see it. I found the title of priest (Hm-nTr), as well as Courtier of the Palace (smr-praA). As with any nobleman, this guy racked up titles.

I found it odd that the article doesn't mention the tomb owner's name, but it's fairly obvious right there above the figure of the man with the black wig: Shepseskaf-Ankh. It's interesting that he's named for the last king of Dynasty 4, and it's not a name I've come across before. I'm pretty certain that's what it is, but the photos I've seen are not great so perhaps I'm misreading it.

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Hi Kmt-sesh,

Thanks for posting the picture, if I come across anymore about it I will add it.I scrolled down the page to some other links and found this one interesting as well,as it shows that even common people were buried the the Valley of the Kings.

Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

At the bottom of the page of this link there are a couple of other links that I will leave it to others to read rather than post them.They deal with embalming one is a brain drain bed and the other is about an embalming chamber.

jmccr8

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In my trip to Egypt I remember visiting tombs of the wealthy, not pharoahs. These tombs had paintings on the walls that showed more about life in ancient Egypt. Much was these paintings showed the people collecting taxes and punishing tax evaders and so forth. Maybe these people had earned enough to pay for a tomb for themselves.

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Interesting find :tu:

eta, just realised updated links had been posted so removed mine

Edited by seeder

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Hi Kmt-sesh,

Thanks for posting the picture, if I come across anymore about it I will add it.I scrolled down the page to some other links and found this one interesting as well,as it shows that even common people were buried the the Valley of the Kings.

Almost 3,000-year-old tomb of female singer found in Egypt

At the bottom of the page of this link there are a couple of other links that I will leave it to others to read rather than post them.They deal with embalming one is a brain drain bed and the other is about an embalming chamber.

jmccr8

I certainly remember reading about this discovery. More than anything it's a clear reminder that the Valley of the Kings has not been played out—as people have been insisting for the past century. For that matter, the discovery of KV63 in recent years is very vivid evidence of how wrong that notion is.

The burial in your link is that of a temple woman dating to Dynasty 22. By this time, the Valley of the Kings had already been abandoned for a century or more (it was a New Kingdom royal burial ground, and was discontinued at the end of Dynasty 20). Just the same, as I recall, this woman's coffin proved to be an intrusive burial in an older, original tomb in the Valley. If I remember correctly (and I can't guarantee I'm right on this), the original minor tomb comprised a burial of a Dynasty 18 official.

But private people were permitted burial in the Valley, on occasion. The most famous example would be KV46, the tomb of Yuya and Tjuya. These were the parents of Tiye, the Great Wife of Amunhotep III, and hence the great-grandparents of Tutankhamun. But to be sure you had to be someone of high status (at least in the eyes of your king) to be permitted burial in the Valley during the New Kingdom. As for after the New Kingdom, as long as high officials weren't aware of it...eh, sure, help yourself. :w00t:

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A word on the word "pyramid." To be honest no one is certain of its etymology, although numerous theories exist. There's no real historical evidence that it means "fire in the middle." This comes more from modern shaky sources. It's altogether possible the word stems from a Greek term for a conical loaf of bread, or from something else in Greek material culture; not surprising, considering so much of the modern vocabulary describing ancient Egypt comes not from Egypt but from ancient Greece. To the victor go the spoils.

The ancient Egyptian word for pyramid was mr. Those two consonants are all that remain of the original word (the vowels are not known), and the etymology of mr itself is not understood. Spartan's quoted definition runs along the right lines but might be a bit askew (not The_Spartan's fault). In later times the usage of definite articles became more common in inscriptions, so there arose the term pA-mr ("the mr," or "the 'pyramid'"). If this is indeed the origin of our word "pyramid"—and I'm not claiming it is so—I for one can't explain where the "-id" suffix came from (pa-mr-id).

I think we can all agree, however, that the pyramids of ancient Egypt were not medical clinics.

That's the word.

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something i found

Obmer = tomb

O-O = tomb

O-O = posterity, heir

Wokha tebe = the base of the tomb

Ben ben = obelisk or pyramid

Ben ben = to well up, overflow (also found in Wolof), copulate

(Mr)

Nu.t mer = a pyramid city or a town built up around pyramids

Mer.t -- beyond, on the other side (EWB 308a)

Mer -- to die, dead, death (314b)

Mer = tomb

Merti = dead

Per nheh = house of eternity

Per mer = the enclosure or base of the pyramid

Per Mer ="House of death"

Pa Merti = "The dead"

(Mt)

Met; Mut = death

Metu = man as begetter

Metut = posterity

Per met = house of regeneration/death/posterity

http://www.egyptsearch.com/forums/Forum8/HTML/000488.html

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So they tell me

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That's cool! I wonder what else lies hidden under the sand...

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This is whole thread very interesting.

I find it amusing that after thousands of years the human race is increasingly going to pictographs to represent words and concepts. The newest are the new pictographs going into effect on 2014 on Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDS. Even that' being shortened to SDS. Some of the pictographs are obvious, but others need a cation as if you don't know what the pictograph means, you can misinterpet it. I know why this is being done, so it will be easier to ship products around the globe without having to have every language on the label.

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I am willing to bet that there are amazing discoveries left to be had buried in the sand, maybe even some unexpected things as well. Exciting stuff.

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Awesome find, it's cool how many tombs have not been found yet

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The more we can learn about the past... The more we can grow in modern times... This is very interesting to me...

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Bet there's more to come under all that sand...

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yeah.more sand. :innocent:

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There's in all likelihood much more to be found in the desert.

Seventeen lost pyramids among thousands of buried Egyptian settlements pinpointed by infrared satellite images | Mail Online

Lost civilization under Persian Gulf?

How knows how much more there is to our past,I always enjoy discovering new things and appreciate the people who are interested enough to find the past.Thanks to all those scientificie types.

jmccr8

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Fascinating article, what lies underneath Egypt seems to hold as many wonders as what sits above....a mesmerizing culture!

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I have never once believed that the pyramids are tombs. Is this photo a representation of the tomb they mention? Where is the link to the news page?

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I have never once believed that the pyramids are tombs.

That's unfortunate.

Is this photo a representation of the tomb they mention? Where is the link to the news page?

If you mean this photo, it is clearly a photo of the man's offering chapel. He was a high official named Shepseskaf-Ankh whose title of physician was only one of numerous. But as an official and not a royal, he would not have been buried in a pyramid but in a mastaba or a derivative thereof. I just did a quick image search and didn't find any photos of the exterior of the tomb, so I can't be sure of the form it took. There's now more information out there on the Web than when this discussion first launched, and I'm pleased to see I read his name correctly in the glyphs. Perhaps one of those links can provide you more details (Google "Shepseskaf-Ankh").

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Oh yes, I know you of ald. I am aware of what you WANT me to think.

Have you read Ibrahim Karim? That guy rocks! He puts a whole new spin, probably with accuracy, on what those pyramids mean.

That's unfortunate.

If you mean this photo, it is clearly a photo of the man's offering chapel. He was a high official named Shepseskaf-Ankh whose title of physician was only one of numerous. But as an official and not a royal, he would not have been buried in a pyramid but in a mastaba or a derivative thereof. I just did a quick image search and didn't find any photos of the exterior of the tomb, so I can't be sure of the form it took. There's now more information out there on the Web than when this discussion first launched, and I'm pleased to see I read his name correctly in the glyphs. Perhaps one of those links can provide you more details (Google "Shepseskaf-Ankh").

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Oh yes, I know you of ald. I am aware of what you WANT me to think.

Have you read Ibrahim Karim? That guy rocks! He puts a whole new spin, probably with accuracy, on what those pyramids mean.

I don't "want" you to think anything just because I stand by it. If there's anything I "want," it's for people not certain of ancient history to do the studying and reading for themselves. More than a few longstanding UM members were staunch believers in fringe and alternative concepts before they dug deeper for themselves, and saw where these concepts fell flat.

I don't presume to demand that other people take what I write or post at face value. As I always say, if you disagree with something I say, research it in reliable professional literature and see what you can discover for yourself. If I am wrong, point it out in the relevant literature so I can correct my mistake.

I am not familiar with Karim. I googled him but got a lot of hits, and don't care to plow through that kind of stuff. Do you have a link that summarizes what he's about?

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I don't "want" you to think anything just because I stand by it. If there's anything I "want," it's for people not certain of ancient history to do the studying and reading for themselves. More than a few longstanding UM members were staunch believers in fringe and alternative concepts before they dug deeper for themselves, and saw where these concepts fell flat.

I don't presume to demand that other people take what I write or post at face value. As I always say, if you disagree with something I say, research it in reliable professional literature and see what you can discover for yourself. If I am wrong, point it out in the relevant literature so I can correct my mistake.

I am not familiar with Karim. I googled him but got a lot of hits, and don't care to plow through that kind of stuff. Do you have a link that summarizes what he's about?

Kmt_sesh, here are a few excerpts:

BioGeometry® is a science that deals with the Energy of Shape; it uses shapes, colours, motion, orientation and sound to produce a vibrational quality that balances energy fields. BioGeometrical shapes are two or three-dimensional shapes specially designed to interact with the earth’s energy fields to produce balancing effects on multiple levels on biological systems. They were developed and patented by Dr. Ibrahim F. Karim, D.Sc. in Cairo, Egypt, during research since 1968.

They must have been able to interact with nature in a more advanced way than we do today, based on the study of the vibrational properties of the geometrical shapes they used in their monuments, art, statues, amulets, and many other aspects of life. The effects of energy went beyond the Pyramid shape; the Ancient Egyptians used it in a very practical way in all aspects of their life.
Pythagoras was the first to introduce to the western world the ancient Egyptian way of correlating musical qualities with quantifiable, numerical values. The golden ratio of 1.618 expressed as the ultimate proportion of harmony, beauty and spirituality was used in the design of sacred buildings in Ancient Architecture to produce spiritual energy that facilitated connectivity with spiritual realms through resonant prayer. Popular among spiritually significant shapes are pyramids and hemispheres (e.g. the domes, that are the basis of religious buildings, be it a mosque, a church or a synagogue).

http://www.rexresearch.com/biogeom/biogeom.htm

In short, more New Age hocus-pocus. :td:

cormac

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Kmt_sesh, here are a few excerpts:

http://www.rexresear...eom/biogeom.htm

In short, more New Age hocus-pocus. :td:

cormac

Sounds like a weird brand of feng shui to me, with some New Age "sacred geometry" thrown in. Dangerously close to landscape geometry, and we don't want to go there, do we? :w00t:

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Hi Kmt-sesh,

After reading your response in post #6 about common people just burying in the Valley of the Kings.I came across another article about the singer that I will post I found that it was a more detailed in that it gave more information.i am also going to post a couple of other links that are related to common peoples burials,one is about the workers tombs.

Tomb of the Chantress - Archaeology Magazine Archive

The Discovery of the Tombs of the Pyramid Builders at Giza: Dr. Zahi Hawass

Tombs of Ancient Egypt

I had hoped to respond earlier but have been quite busy.

jmccr8

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