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OverSword

Intel Core vPro processors

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My favorite part of this article should serve as a warning to American companies:

The new Intel Core vPro processors contain a new remote access feature which allows 100% remote access to a PC 100% of the time, even if the computer is turned off. Core vPro processors contain a second physical processor embedded within the main processor which has its own operating system embedded on the chip itself. As long as the power supply is available and in working condition, it can be woken up by the Core vPro processor, which runs on the system’s phantom power and is able to quietly turn individual hardware components on and access anything on them.

Let’s make this perfectly clear. This eliminates ALL possible privacy. It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again. Someone will be able to even install software unknown to the owner.

Clearly, if this was not inspired by the NSA, they must be jumping up and down with glee. This means that anyone in the world using a computer with an Intel Chip will be vulnerable. If you go on vacation, and even turn off your computer, they will have a free access.

Between Microsoft and its Windows 8 and Intel with its Core vPro processors, it looks like it is time for competition to take that crown from the USA and restore privacy. Obviously, American companies grant every possible wish the NSA ever had.

read it here http://armstrongeconomics.com/2013/10/24/privacy-is-becoming-a-crime-why-intel-chips-may-present-a-whole-new-risk/

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Good God, man. I've hear rumours of similar features already in several different AMD processors as well...

Talk about a brave new world...what kind of place will this be in another 15 years?

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Well like the article points out, now would be a good time for smaller processor manufacturerers to step up to the plate and give us a product which can guarantee privacy. If they build it people will definetly buy it. Intel would be driven out of the PC market and only big corporations on huge networks would desire to use thier spying product.

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You obviously don't even know what this all means and are just overexciting yourself because you think you're on to "them".

Love it how ppl just take out a fragment of information and put it into another context and think they got it all figured out.

Be afraid, be very afraid ... of your own illusions.

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You obviously don't even know what this all means and are just overexciting yourself because you think you're on to "them".

Love it how ppl just take out a fragment of information and put it into another context and think they got it all figured out.

Be afraid, be very afraid ... of your own illusions.

Does the NSA pay well? Did you get a good benefits package?

As long as the power supply is available and in working condition, it can be woken up by the Core vPro processor, which runs on the system’s phantom power and is able to quietly turn individual hardware components on and access anything on them.

That's in terms even a computer layman could understand. I don't understand why you would call this an illusion.

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And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:

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I guess it's gonna take some time to google that one.

Feel free to panic until you learn more.

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And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:

Couldn't they access anything? I'm not saying Intel would or that they are doing this for nefarious reasons, but it sure seems the potential is there for it to be exploited. So it will be.

Edited by Razer

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This is naturally bogus. It is far simpler to use one of the primary cores than a dedicated core.

Cheers,

Badeskov

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And what information do you think Intel will be able to access when they access the processor?

:rolleyes:

It's not what 'Intel' will access render. Use your imagination and try not to pretend that alphabet agencies don't drool at the prospect of having complete remote access to any computer that's online.

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If you are paranoid:

When you turn your computer off, also turn the power bar off. Phantom power is not sufficient to run actual components, so even if the evil agencies are trying to access your computer unless they have a secret agent inside your house to press the power bar button they can't turn your computer off.

Encrypt your harddrive with an open source encryption like true crypt, not a proprietary one that might ship with Windows or OS X. If you have an encryption key, keep it on a USB stick and physically remove it from your computer when you are not using it.

Turn off your Wifi or unplug your ethernet when you are not using your computer.

Get a firewall for your home network (again, using open source software) so you can completely block all untrusted incoming signals.

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Couldn't they access anything? I'm not saying Intel would or that they are doing this for nefarious reasons, but it sure seems the potential is there for it to be exploited. So it will be.

Well no, that's just not how computers work.

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It's not what 'Intel' will access render. Use your imagination and try not to pretend that alphabet agencies don't drool at the prospect of having complete remote access to any computer that's online.

This really isn't something where you can "use your imagination". Well not in the way the imagination runs wild here. Computers work a certain way...not this paranoid unrelated way which is portrayed here. Accessing a processor remotely is not the same as browsing through hard disk information. And you can get that info through a myriad of other ways. Not to scare you, but this is the reality we live in.

And not to bust anyones ego here : your information just isn't that interesting to follow up on.

And also: remote management isn't a new concept. It's over a decennia old. AND it's not even necessary (to access certain meta data). If anyone wants to access your computer, and you are connected to the internet, it's possible. But this technology is pretty damn awesome and distinguishes itself since you can repair a blocked system, from a distance. No more calling a helpdesk and waiting for someone to come over who doesn't know what to do when he gets there since he can't access anything. This is dream technology for many companies.

And, it's not like companies just roll out technologies like this. They are extensively tested by several instances, organizations, authorities. A certified authority doesn't just fall out of the air. And a company like Intel has a name to uphold.

If you know anything about computers, hardware and software, you know this thread is just ignorance at it's fullest.

Edited by Render

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Well no, that's just not how computers work.

Can you elaborate on that because as I am sitting here typing i'm accessing my computers processor via the keyboard which gives me access to everything on my computer.

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Can you elaborate on that because as I am sitting here typing i'm accessing my computers processor via the keyboard which gives me access to everything on my computer.

A processor does not store information.

Look at it like a calculator. Which it is.

A calculator waits for input and computes, it doesn't hold the info.

Which is why it is called a "processor". It processes.

Edited by Render
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A processor does not store information.

Look at it like a calculator. Which it is.

A calculator waits for input and computes, it doesn't hold the info.

Which is why it is called a "processor". It processes.

Yeah, and it processes the commands to access memory.

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Yeah, and it processes the commands to access memory.

It's not the same as actually storing that information so that others can look at it.

it processes meta data, it doesn't look at data itself and store it somewhere so others can look at it.

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It's not the same as actually storing that information so that others can look at it.

it processes meta data, it doesn't look at data itself and store it somewhere so others can look at it.

I'm not sure you know how computers work or you are being obtuse on purpose.

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I'm not sure you know how computers work or you are being obtuse on purpose.

Im trying to keep it simple. I don't know what more you want from me.

There is a difference in regulating how data is accessed and looking at the actual data itself (preferably in a human language, which is what ppl here seem to think is possible.)

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Im trying to keep it simple. I don't know what more you want from me.

There is a difference in regulating how data is accessed and looking at the actual data itself (preferably in a human language, which is what ppl here seem to think is possible.)

From the article. "It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again. Someone will be able to even install software unknown to the owner."

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From the article. "It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again. Someone will be able to even install software unknown to the owner."

Yeah, that's from the article .... an article written by someone who doesn't understand the technology.

Sad how ppl keep getting misinformed by these "messiahs of truth" ... who are more interested in spreading paranoia than factual information.

To say it in your words:

I'm not sure you know how computers work or you are being obtuse on purpose.

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Yeah, that's from the article .... an article written by someone who doesn't understand the technology.

Sad how ppl keep getting misinformed by these "messiahs of truth" ... who are more interested in spreading paranoia than factual information.

I don't think this is spreading paranoia, just educating people. There are people that don't even realize that there webcams can be hacked or that their phone can be used as a listening device even when turned off.

Computers can already be hacked and hardrives read. This just allows for it to happen at anytime and harder to take maeasures against it since the backdoor is built into the system.

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I don't think this is spreading paranoia, just educating people. There are people that don't even realize that there webcams can be hacked or that their phone can be used as a listening device even when turned off.

Computers can already be hacked and hardrives read. This just allows for it to happen at anytime and harder to take maeasures against it since the backdoor is built into the system.

It's not, it's actually to control the already existing backdoors and vulnerabilities created by mishandling a computer.

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And again, this technology is "old". This is just a tweak to make it even better. It isn't forced on anyone, you still have to request it all and implement it yourself or by your vendor.

Edited by Render

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First of all, this belongs in the Conspiricy Forum. Unless their is scientific proof???

My favorite part of this article should serve as a warning to American companies:

The new Intel Core vPro processors contain a new remote access feature which allows 100% remote access to a PC 100% of the time, even if the computer is turned off. Core vPro processors contain a second physical processor embedded within the main processor which has its own operating system embedded on the chip itself. As long as the power supply is available and in working condition, it can be woken up by the Core vPro processor, which runs on the system’s phantom power and is able to quietly turn individual hardware components on and access anything on them.

Let’s make this perfectly clear. This eliminates ALL possible privacy. It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again. Someone will be able to even install software unknown to the owner.

Clearly, if this was not inspired by the NSA, they must be jumping up and down with glee. This means that anyone in the world using a computer with an Intel Chip will be vulnerable. If you go on vacation, and even turn off your computer, they will have a free access.

Between Microsoft and its Windows 8 and Intel with its Core vPro processors, it looks like it is time for competition to take that crown from the USA and restore privacy. Obviously, American companies grant every possible wish the NSA ever had.

read it here http://armstrongecon...whole-new-risk/

OK. So I work at Intel here in Oregon, and we run every single new product through our area. We check the functionality of every single function on the chip, while it is still a wafer, and then again once it is in the case. I'm just a technician, but I do have a LOT of experience with testing all kinds of processors. And what is being said in the article is completely made up. Total BS. At least in mass produced products.

The capacity to make such is clearly buildable, but it would draw power, and space, and require extra layers and extra design work, and extra development time... Like +50% development time, at least. And, Intel, in case you've not read about it in the news, is recently sucking wind at getting stuff to market on schedule. So, I can say that they would not add some extra stuff, like an extra processor, extra embeded operating system, and extra wifi... just to "maybe" spy on someone about something that is undefined. Not to the point of loosing income. Just my opinion with 9 years experience though.

A processor does not store information.

Which is why it is called a "processor". It processes.

I do believe that you could pipe data to a secondary chip wifi, but to what point? And only while the computer is ON. Whoever wants to steal the data would have to have a reception device located very nearby. Unless we want to buy into a complete Conspiricy of some overriding agency putting recievers everywhere, and somehow processing millions, or billions, of processors of data and then analyzing it, and storing it... Which would take more computers then are being spied on.... This has got to be complete BS.

From the article. "It will allow IT professionals to view the contents of hard drives, check the memory, or hunt for problems on a machine without actually being in front of it. Nothing in your computer will ever be private again.

IT professionals can already do that, just by knowing your IP addess, as long as the machine is ON, they can get into it.

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