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joshT

Real Dinosaur Foot Found...?

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DORMOD, MONGOLIA — They say even under perfect conditions, it couldn’t be possible.

Yet somehow, paleontologists have unearthed a preserved dinosaur foot (or bird foot?) deep in the heart of the Gobi Desert in Southern Mongolia.

They even have pics. The link is here:

http://weeklyworldne...aur-foot-found/

EDIT: typo in description intake->intact sorry

Edited by joshT
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Very cool.

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Weekly world news....

The guys who print stuff about demon babies giving birth to aliens, and talking trees ?

I know sometimes their stories are legit, and I do love bat boy, but until this shows up in another news outlet, I will hold off on getting excited.

Edited by Simbi Laveau
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Very interesting it looks very real but.....How could it be preserved for so long and still be in amazing shape and texture....could be fake or from a bird :no:

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If the story was legit that would have been an AWESOME news but..... I'm sorry guys. --->

http://en.wikipedia....wiki/Upland_Moa The Upland Moa (Megalapteryx didinus) was a species of Moa bird endemic to New Zealand. It was a member of the ratite family, a type of flightless bird with no keel on the sternum. It was the last moa species to become extinct, vanishing around 1500 AD.

419px-Megalapteryx.png

Edited by Bildr
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They even have pics. The link is here:

http://weeklyworldne...aur-foot-found/

That picture has been posted on various websites. Like Bildr has already said, it's not a dinosaur's foot -

The Lesser Megalapteryx or Upland Moa (Megalapteryx didinus) was a flightless bird native to the northern part of New Zealand. It became extinct around the 14th century AD. Early on it was possible that they could take flight but as they evolved they grew in size, with the larger ones reaching nearly 500 pounds and standing 12 feet high.

http://www.icanhasin...alapteryx-foot/

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Ditto

http://www.geekologi...-some-old-e.php

(Seriously, the Weekly World News? I wonder how Bat Boy is doing?)

Edited by Kahn
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bah, im disapointed I though it was a legit news.... :no:

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The op's link makes my Chrome post this "The Website Ahead Contains Malware!"

"Google Chrome has blocked access to weeklyworldnews.com for now.

Even if you have visited this website safely in the past, visiting it now is very likely to infect your computer with malware.

Malware is malicious software that causes things like identity theft, financial loss, and permanent file deletion."

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The op's link makes my Chrome post this "The Website Ahead Contains Malware!"

"Google Chrome has blocked access to weeklyworldnews.com for now.

Even if you have visited this website safely in the past, visiting it now is very likely to infect your computer with malware.

Malware is malicious software that causes things like identity theft, financial loss, and permanent file deletion."

I'm using Chrome and it loads fine for me with no warnings or errors.

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The most well preserved dinosaurs found so far is of an Edmontosaurus, who has been called "Dakota". Oh and "Leonardo" the Bracylophosaurus.

Edited by Rogue Suga

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