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Still Waters

Germany 'third' gender becomes law

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Germany has become Europe's first country to allow babies with characteristics of both sexes to be registered as neither male nor female.

Parents are now allowed to leave the gender blank on birth certificates, in effect creating a new category of "indeterminate sex".

The move is aimed at removing pressure on parents to make quick decisions on sex assignment surgery for newborns.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-24767225

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Good move IMO

But I wonder, is there more people being born now with aspects of both genders? Why would this suddenly become an issue?

Edited by OverSword

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Good move IMO

But I wonder, is there more people being born now with aspects of both genders? Why would this suddenly become an issue?

More people possibly, but most likely the same overall percentage...

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I wonder when the car insurance companies will start catering for this?

Who shall we pick.. sheilas wheels, More than or indeterminate not sure than?

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This should be in all countries.

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Good move IMO

But I wonder, is there more people being born now with aspects of both genders? Why would this suddenly become an issue?

I agree it's a good move.

But what makes you think it has suddenly become an issue? According to the article linked in the OP, several other countries already provide this option, including Australia, New Zealand, Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan.

I doubt that the proportion of intersex people is increasing, although I imagine it's entirely possible. Nevertheless, just because an issue is being addressed for the first time doesn't mean the issue didn't exist before. Firstly, as humans we're so used to the concept of two genders that accepting the existence of intersex people is difficult. Secondly, because the condition is rare and isn't necessarily obvious to others, most of us would have no conscious knowledge of having met an intersex person; and familiarity with the situation is the first step to recognising that something needs to be done to address problems surrounding it.

In my case I learned a lot from the writings of Zoe Brain: http://aebrain.blogspot.com.au/

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