Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
questionmark

Poverty in America Is Mainstream

9 posts in this topic

Few topics in American society have more myths and stereotypes surrounding them than poverty, misconceptions that distort both our politics and our domestic policy making.

They include the notion that poverty affects a relatively small number of Americans, that the poor are impoverished for years at a time, that most of those in poverty live in inner cities, that too much welfare assistance is provided and that poverty is ultimately a result of not working hard enough. Although pervasive, each assumption is flat-out wrong.

Contrary to popular belief, the percentage of the population that directly encounters poverty is exceedingly high. My research indicates that nearly 40 percent of Americans between the ages of 25 and 60 will experience at least one year below the official poverty line during that period ($23,492 for a family of four), and 54 percent will spend a year in poverty or near poverty (below 150 percent of the poverty line).

Read more

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I'd believe it.

In lots of places, living near the poverty line doesn't have to make you poor though. If people would learn to get creative and live within their means, the poverty line wouldn't be such a scary thing.

No, I'm not saying people don't need help sometimes, but people aren't helpless either. Or they shouldn't be.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd believe it.

In lots of places, living near the poverty line doesn't have to make you poor though. If people would learn to get creative and live within their means, the poverty line wouldn't be such a scary thing.

No, I'm not saying people don't need help sometimes, but people aren't helpless either. Or they shouldn't be.

There is that side of it. I know around here, there are people who literally put ownership of a new iPhone over owning a car or even getting a license. Poverty is not pretty, ever. But we can't discount the people who can't manage money to save their lives.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've lived it. You quickly learn to be creative with food :yes:

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is that side of it. I know around here, there are people who literally put ownership of a new iPhone over owning a car or even getting a license. Poverty is not pretty, ever. But we can't discount the people who can't manage money to save their lives.

There is nothing wrong with being poor, as long as the upward mobility is not inhibited. The problem is that the US is also at the bottom of the upward mobility scale for at least a decade now.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing wrong with being poor, as long as the upward mobility is not inhibited. The problem is that the US is also at the bottom of the upward mobility scale for at least a decade now.

Agreed. Abolishing the middle-class essentially keeps the poor in the poor bracket.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is nothing wrong with being poor, as long as the upward mobility is not inhibited. The problem is that the US is also at the bottom of the upward mobility scale for at least a decade now.

And just to add to that statement, what's more frustrating is that the older generations just don't believe this. The rose colored glasses are still strongly tinted because of a prior America, they refuse to acknowledge the current America.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been working on a research paper on Social Security. Without it, 50% of the elderly would be in poverty. I agree there has to be a safety net in this country but I fundamentally disagree with a cradle to grave mentality. This country and its policies should be geared toward upward mobility. There are plenty of jobs out there for Americans. Many high paying job sectors are severely underemployed. The problem is that Americans either do not have the proper education for these jobs or they simply don't want to do them. This country should be putting more emphasis in opening up education opportunities to Americans who want to do these traditional blue collar jobs. It can be incredibly lucrative.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's true, and many drop out of high school because of economic factors. You're either old enough to get a job and pay bills, or go to school and have no food on the table, or to be able to pay your bills. It's a reality for many, and of course you need a diploma or GED to go to college. Then after years of working, and just making ends meet, many have no time for that. It would put them in economic shambles.

There should be more easily accessible routes for those in these situations, to be able to pay for a higher education, but they are stuck paying bills with no extra money for anything extra, I suppose. There are many people who are fully capable to do these jobs, yet the opportunity is far out of reach. There is alot of good talent going to waste.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.