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Waspie_Dwarf

Success of Commercial Space Program

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NASA Hails Success of Commercial Space Program

Private Space Station Resupply Underway, Plans Readied for Astronauts

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden Wednesday hailed the success of the agency’s public-private partnership with American companies to resupply the International Space Station and announced the next phase of contracting with U.S. companies to transport astronauts is set to begin next week.

A little more than two years after the end of the Space Shuttle Program, the United States now has two space transportation systems capable of delivering science experiments and supplies from U.S. soil to the International Space Station. Under an ambitious plan funded by the Obama Administration, the agency is seeking to partner with American companies to send NASA astronauts to the space station as soon as 2017.

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Commercial Space Program Success

A little more than two years after the end of the Space Shuttle Program, the United States now has two space transportation systems -- SpaceX's Falcon rocket and Dragon spacecraft and Orbital's Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft -- capable of delivering science experiments and supplies from U.S. soil to the International Space Station.

NASA and its Commercial Crew Program partners also are working to develop the next generation of U.S. spacecraft and rockets capable of transporting humans to and from low-Earth orbit from American soil. NASA intends to use new commercial capabilities to fly U.S. astronauts to and from the International Space Station within the next four years.

Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Highlights from Commercial Flights to the International Space Station

A little more than two years after the end of the Space Shuttle Program, the United States now has two space transportation systems -- SpaceX's Falcon rocket and Dragon spacecraft and Orbital's Antares rocket and Cygnus spacecraft -- capable of delivering science experiments and supplies from U.S. soil to the International Space Station.

Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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NASA News Conference on Completion of COTS Program

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden discusses the success of the agency's Commercial Orbital Transportation Services (COTS) initiative during a televised news briefing at NASA Headquarters. Through COTS, NASA's partners Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) and Orbital Sciences Corp., developed new U.S. rockets and spacecraft, launched from U.S. soil, capable of transporting cargo to low-Earth orbit and the International Space Station. A successful Orbital Sciences demonstration mission to the space station was completed in October, signifying the end of COTS development. SpaceX made its first trip to the space station in May 2012 and completed its COTS partnership with NASA the same year. The agency now contracts space station cargo resupply missions with both companies.

The briefing participants were:

-- Charles Bolden, NASA Administrator

-- Alan Lindenmoyer, Manager of Commercial Crew and Cargo Program, NASA

-- Gwynne Shotwell, President, SpaceX

-- Frank Culbertson, Executive Vice President and General Manager, Orbital Sciences Advanced Programs Group

-- Frank Slazer, Vice President of Space Systems, Aerospace Industries Association

-- Phil McAlister, Director of Commercial Spaceflight Development, NASA

Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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I love it. But this should have been done in the 70's or 80's imagine how much advanced we would be...

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I love it. But this should have been done in the 70's or 80's imagine how much advanced we would be...

Actually you are putting the cart before the horse. The reason it can be done know is because the technology has advanced to the point where commercial companies (rather than governments) can afford to do it.

In the '70's and '80's the technology was far less advanced and far more expensive. The reason it wasn't done then was because it couldn't be done then.

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