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Waspie_Dwarf

'Watershed' Cosmic Explosion Studied

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NASA Missions Study 'Watershed' Cosmic Explosion in Unparalleled Detail

On April 27, a blast of light from a dying star in a distant galaxy became the focus of astronomers around the world. The explosion, known as a gamma-ray burst and designated GRB 130427A, tops the charts as one of the brightest ever seen.

A trio of NASA satellites, working in concert with ground-based robotic telescopes, captured never-before-seen details that challenge current theoretical understandings of how gamma-ray bursts work.

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Optical Flash From GRB 130427A

This movie shows GRB 130427A as viewed by the RAPTOR telescopes located near Los Alamos, N.M, and on Mount Haleakala on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The movie opens with wide-field images acquired by a RAPTOR All-Sky Monitor, one of the three identical systems to first detect the burst's optical flash. The movie then switches to observations from RAPTOR-T, which autonomously turned toward the burst after receiving an alert from NASA's Swift. The telescope imaged the burst for 2 hours and captured simultaneous images in four different colors.

Credit: T. Vestrand, LANL/NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Jet Shockwaves Produce Gamma Rays

Theorists believe that GRB jets produce gamma rays by two processes involving shock waves. Shells of material within the jet move at different speeds and collide, generating internal shock waves that result in low-energy (million electron volt, or MeV) gamma rays. As the leading edge of the jet interacts with its environment, it generates an external shock wave that results in the production of high-energy (billion electron volt, or GeV) gamma rays. Artist's rendering.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Overview Animation of Gamma-ray Burst

Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the cosmos. Astronomers think most occur when the core of a massive star runs out of nuclear fuel, collapses under its own weight, and forms a black hole. The black hole then drives jets of particles that drill all the way through the collapsing star at nearly the speed of light. Artist's rendering.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Yeah....my fault....sorry about that....

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Pics or it didn't happen, NASA :P

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Something about space on the front page just in time for the Doctor Who 50th anniversary! Actually not much of a coincidence being on this site but still, it's fantastic.

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Pics or it didn't happen, NASA :P

Please explain what you mean here?

In your explanation could you please take into account the fact that there is a video of it happening in THIS thread (the first video to be precise, the one with the title "Optical Flash From GRB 130427A" and the description underneath it explaining what the video shows).

I only ask because your post does rather give the impression that what constitutes scientific discovery is based solely on whether you have seen a picture of it or not.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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Wondering how many planets located in vicinity have been blasted off. Maybe some were inhabited as well. This universe is so wild!

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"If one of these happened to go off in a nearby star system within our own galaxy then it would spell certain doom for our planet, however fortunately the odds of this happening are estimated to be less than 1 in 10 million." Well I must say this is reassuring considering that there are an estimated 3 Billion to 100 Billion in our Galaxy alone. :w00t:

Very interesting that we finally caught one in the act. The odds of that are large enough.

Edited by cerberusxp

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I'm glad I was no where near that puppy when it blew...

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I'm glad I was no where near that puppy when it blew...

We wouldn't be talking about it that's for sure!

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Awesome I wish we could see this with the naked eye

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