Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 3
rapture

Reptiles Categorized as Animals?

73 posts in this topic

The Mayan spoke of the "gods of the underworld" as reptilian in nature; and connected their return to Earth with changes in the heavens; perhaps planet X ( Nibiru) ; however, people( myself included) have tried to report contact with them with or without the return of this planet; nevertheless, with all the histories, myths, and legends of reptiles in contact with countless human civilizations, I am yet to find any that catorgorized the reptiles as animals. This is a new thing. The word animal usually conveys no real threat; reptiles hardly fit that profile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

humans are dangerous, elephants are dangerous, so what you are sayin is reptiles are non Earth origin with no based facts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of course lizard people are animals... They aren't vegetable or mineral :whistle:

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Animals

noun

The definition of animals are members of the kingdom Animalia and are generally characterized by having a multicellular body, quick movement, specialized sense organs and the ability to get and digest food.

That includes reptiles last I looked.

8 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mayan spoke of the "gods of the underworld" as reptilian in nature; and connected their return to Earth with changes in the heavens;

Since when do the Mayans know more about the world than people in the present day?

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not following you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

perhaps the op meant to say mammal? still doesn't make any sense, though.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mayan spoke of the "gods of the underworld" as reptilian in nature; and connected their return to Earth with changes in the heavens; perhaps planet X ( Nibiru) ; however, people( myself included) have tried to report contact with them with or without the return of this planet; nevertheless, with all the histories, myths, and legends of reptiles in contact with countless human civilizations, I am yet to find any that catorgorized the reptiles as animals. This is a new thing. The word animal usually conveys no real threat; reptiles hardly fit that profile.

however, people( myself included) have tried to report contact with them

You made contct with them????

Edited by White Unicorn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All reptiles are alien reptilians from Planet X now? Is that what you're getting at?

You haven't found any ancient civilizations that called reptiles animals.

Good thing the modern civilizations all agree then. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since when do the Mayans know more about the world than people in the present day?

Come on! Their end-of-the-world calendar was.... oh, wait, never mind.....

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as ancient cultures and their understanding of the natural/spiritual world, one can see where these cultures might have a different view of reptiles, the Mayans had to deal with venomous serpents like the Fer-de-lance, that lived in leaf litter and could surprise and then kill with a single bite. It is easy to understand they might consider the demons of the underworld reptilian.

That in no way makes reptiles non-animals. Having kept turtles, snakes and also having bred lizards, I can tell you they are very much animals, and fascinating ones at that. Sometimes they get a bad rap, but the vast majority are harmless, even beneficial, and the truly dangerous ones should only be handled and kept by experts, because accidents can happen.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'British English' practice used to be that animals = mammals; birds and reptiles weren't 'animals'. I don't know if this is still true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'British English' practice used to be that animals = mammals; birds and reptiles weren't 'animals'. I don't know if this is still true.

If it is, then their system is seriously flawed. Mammals are vastly outnumbered by the non-mammal animals. They really do make up just a small portion of the animal kingdom.

Also, yeah, the original post makes no sense whatsoever. Just what is it that makes reptiles so much more threatening to you? And what on earth do they have to do with planet x?

If this is an animal, then reptiles sure as hell are.

post-127455-0-49383900-1385959310_thumb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'British English' practice used to be that animals = mammals; birds and reptiles weren't 'animals'. I don't know if this is still true.

the Britannica does not seem to agree with that:

animal (kingdom Animalia), any of a group of multicellular eukaryotic organisms (i.e., as distinct from bacteria, their deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is contained in a membrane-bound nucleus). They are thought to have evolved independently from the unicellular eukaryotes. Animals differ from members of the two other kingdoms of multicellular eukaryotes, the plants (Plantae) and the fungi (Mycota), in fundamental variations in morphology and physiology. This is largely because animals have developed muscles and hence mobility, a characteristic that has stimulated the further development of tissues and organ systems.

Britannica

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'British English' practice used to be that animals = mammals; birds and reptiles weren't 'animals'. I don't know if this is still true.

Are you sure? Any source on that? Because it would be absurd.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it is, then their system is seriously flawed. Mammals are vastly outnumbered by the non-mammal animals. They really do make up just a small portion of the animal kingdom.

Also, yeah, the original post makes no sense whatsoever. Just what is it that makes reptiles so much more threatening to you? And what on earth do they have to do with planet x?

If this is an animal, then reptiles sure as hell are.

Nice Tardigrade BTW.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a6556f5766293eafe701e0c75279c235c89964666a71868d412f569d3f1a5970.jpg

Seriously, I never heard that the lizards are separate. 5th grade, elementary biology.

- Humans

- Animals

- Plants

Sub category - minerals

And shrooms are aliens.

Yay!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Mayan spoke of the "gods of the underworld" as reptilian in nature; and connected their return to Earth with changes in the heavens; perhaps planet X ( Nibiru) ; however, people( myself included) have tried to report contact with them with or without the return of this planet; nevertheless, with all the histories, myths, and legends of reptiles in contact with countless human civilizations, I am yet to find any that catorgorized the reptiles as animals. This is a new thing. The word animal usually conveys no real threat; reptiles hardly fit that profile.

All human cultures have strange beliefs. That they exist does not mean they are depictions of reality. Planet X is a good example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you sure? Any source on that? Because it would be absurd.

There are several examples on this page, especially definition three in the third block of definitions: "a mammal, as opposed to a fish, bird, etc." http://www.thefreedi...ary.com/animal

Edited by PersonFromPorlock

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

'British English' practice used to be that animals = mammals; birds and reptiles weren't 'animals'. I don't know if this is still true.

I have never seen any evidence of that being true.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never seen any evidence of that being true.

I'm not British, I'm Irish, but our spelling and grammar is pretty much British English in all but minor details, and I've seen people in the past, but not recently, insisting that insects, spiders, snails, crabs, etc. aren't animals. When questioned it was clear that they did indeed hold the weird idiosyncratic idea that animal = mammal and other 'animals' like arthropods, molluscs, etc. didn't qualify as animal.

Not a viewpoint I've heard in a while but it doesn't surprise me that some other people this side of the Atlantic still hear or use the idea that animal = mammal and that bugs and slugs and other things aren't animals because of some odd old usage.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genetic data make the phylogeny quite clear now. There were a few surprises, like birds are more closely related to crocodiles than snake are to turtle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reptile

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All mammals are animals, but not all animals are mammals. Some animals are birds, fish, repitles, mollusks, insects, spiders. All living things are either plants or animals (flora or fauna).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not British, I'm Irish, but our spelling and grammar is pretty much British English in all but minor details, and I've seen people in the past, but not recently, insisting that insects, spiders, snails, crabs, etc. aren't animals. When questioned it was clear that they did indeed hold the weird idiosyncratic idea that animal = mammal and other 'animals' like arthropods, molluscs, etc. didn't qualify as animal.

Not a viewpoint I've heard in a while but it doesn't surprise me that some other people this side of the Atlantic still hear or use the idea that animal = mammal and that bugs and slugs and other things aren't animals because of some odd old usage.

I agree. I've heard this on my side of the Atlantic, too.

I think maybe? they get confused by the category Vertebrates: Birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish. Those 5 categories are pounded into our brains in school.

The invertebrates and their many categories not getting so much attention in school as well as being so vastly different from the Vertebrate Five.

They find it hard to reason that "animal" is a vast category that includes both.

Just a guess, though.

Also, I've heard some say that humans are not animals.

Edited by QuiteContrary
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not British, I'm Irish, but our spelling and grammar is pretty much British English in all but minor details, and I've seen people in the past, but not recently, insisting that insects, spiders, snails, crabs, etc. aren't animals. When questioned it was clear that they did indeed hold the weird idiosyncratic idea that animal = mammal and other 'animals' like arthropods, molluscs, etc. didn't qualify as animal.

Not a viewpoint I've heard in a while but it doesn't surprise me that some other people this side of the Atlantic still hear or use the idea that animal = mammal and that bugs and slugs and other things aren't animals because of some odd old usage.

That "old usage" must be the dispense based on which species are invertebrates and which aren't.

And this might be of more info

http://animals.about.com/od/zoologybasics/a/vertinvert.htm

In the schools humans are different from animals because of the compassion and the general awareness.

But in flora/fauna-wise

humans

animals

plants

and shrooms are aliens :D

Edited by Nenaraz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 3

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.