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The_Student

Dyatlov Pass Incident

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Didn't quite know where to put this, but can anyone recommend a good book on the Dyatlov Pass Incident?

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I don't recall many books mentioned on that thread. I could be wrong though.

Me either but I thought the thread itself may be of interest to the OP, which they probably haven't noticed or they would have posted their request in that thread.

This is known in my country as 'trying to be friendly'. :)

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You? Trying to be friendly? :o:P

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I was dithering between these very two, was hoping someone could give a recommendation for one or the other of them :) my budget won't stretch to both!

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Don't forget your local library!

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Didn't quite know where to put this, but can anyone recommend a good book on the Dyatlov Pass Incident?

I got both Eicher and McCloskey for Christmas. I'm more than halfway through McCloskey right now. It's comprehensive, gives lots of background helpful to understanding Russia at the time of the incident and to understanding how these students and their trek fit into that socio-political picture, covers just about every possible explanation you could think of for what happened. OTOH, it reads sometimes like a poorly organized master's thesis, and there were times in the Russian military sections that my eyes just glazed over (could be me). I'd recommend this one as a good starter book for an overview of the incident.

Haven't read Eicher yet, but I understand its strength is in doing a good job of weaving three narratives together: the students' story, the story of the search/recovery, and the author's search for answers. (McCloskey is short on narrative to make the students come alive, IMO). Unlike McCloskey, Eicher apparently comes up with his own answer for what happened. Without having read this one, I can't make more of a direct comparison, but I'd say try to get your hands on both if you can as they each apparently have their own strengths and weaknesses. Enjoy! I'm fascinated by this mystery.

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I got both Eicher and McCloskey for Christmas. I'm more than halfway through McCloskey right now. It's comprehensive, gives lots of background helpful to understanding Russia at the time of the incident and to understanding how these students and their trek fit into that socio-political picture, covers just about every possible explanation you could think of for what happened. OTOH, it reads sometimes like a poorly organized master's thesis, and there were times in the Russian military sections that my eyes just glazed over (could be me). I'd recommend this one as a good starter book for an overview of the incident.

Haven't read Eicher yet, but I understand its strength is in doing a good job of weaving three narratives together: the students' story, the story of the search/recovery, and the author's search for answers. (McCloskey is short on narrative to make the students come alive, IMO). Unlike McCloskey, Eicher apparently comes up with his own answer for what happened. Without having read this one, I can't make more of a direct comparison, but I'd say try to get your hands on both if you can as they each apparently have their own strengths and weaknesses. Enjoy! I'm fascinated by this mystery.

Updating the above in case anyone is interested. I finished Donnie Eicher's "Dead Mountain" last night. It's a page turner I could barely put down, even though I had just finished McCloskey's book right before starting it. If you read only one, I guess I'd pick Eicher, but my best advice would be to read both and start with McCloskey. As compelling a narrative as Eicher creates and as persuasive as his conclusion may be, he skips over things you wouldn't know (and should) without McCloskey.

Either which way, this story will haunt you for a long time to come.

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There has been a Russian documentary filmed at the time , strongly recommend . And some of the people interviewed wrote some books on the case, so

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