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Insanity

Nine Beers Americans No Longer Drink

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Beer is not selling the way it used to. U.S. sales of the beverage declined in four of the past five years. Between 2007 and 2012, beer sales fell by 2.3%, or more than 4.8 million barrels.

This overall drop in beer sales is yet another challenge many of the once most popular U.S. brands have to overcome as they continue to lose market share. According to data provided by Beer Marketer's Insights, American sales of nine major brands, including the once top-selling Budweiser, declined by more than 25% over the past five years. Michelob Light's U.S. sales declined by nearly 70%. The following are the nine beers Americans no longer drink.

9. Labatt Blue

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 28.3%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev S.A./N.V. (NYSE: BUD)
  • Barrels sold (2012): 650,000

8. Budweiser

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 28.8%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 16,800,000

7. Heineken Premium Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 36.7%
  • Brewer: Heineken International
  • Barrels sold (2012): 440,000

6. Milwaukee's Best Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 39.7%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 1,110,000

5. Old Milwaukee

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 54.0%
  • Brewer: Pabst Brewing Company
  • Barrels sold (2012): 400,000

4. Miller Genuine Draft

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 56.4%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 1,390,000

3. Milwaukee's Best Premium

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 58.5%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 650,000

2. Budweiser Select

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 61.5%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 625,000

1. Michelob Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 69.6%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 350,000


http://247wallst.com/special-report/2013/12/09/nine-beers-americans-no-longer-drink-2/

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Are we sure these drops in sales are not just sales these pis-water giants are losing to actuall brewers like manny's and pyramid? I drink more beer than I used to because you can now buy good beer. (Hint: for those who don't know, if it's advertised on TV it's not good beer)

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Are we sure these drops in sales are not just sales these pis-water giants are losing to actuall brewers like manny's and pyramid? I drink more beer than I used to because you can now buy good beer. (Hint: for those who don't know, if it's advertised on TV it's not good beer)

This all day. I can't even remember the last time I had an American beer - and that includes the child companies like Corona.

Anyone who isn't 17 should be able to taste the difference between a quality brew and the American stuff. (I have heard this is largely due to how chemically treated the American beers are, in order to speed up the fermentation process to meet large-scale demand)

Edited by Dark_Grey
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Those 'beers' listed are actually pretty nasty lagers apart Millers which I think is OK, the rest of them taste like cheap lager that has been watered down. They need to brew tasty beer that can be drank at 'room temperature' and enjoyed IMO.

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This all day. I can't even remember the last time I had an American beer - and that includes the child companies like Corona.

Anyone who isn't 17 should be able to taste the difference between a quality brew and the American stuff. (I have heard this is largely due to how chemically treated the American beers are, in order to speed up the fermentation process to meet large-scale demand)

You are so wrong. By far the best beers are brewed in the USA these days, you just have to spend more and they may not be exported to Canada and they definetly do not advertise on TV.

check these

or this

or for more generalized

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You are so wrong.

Opinions. I was speaking mainly of the "advertised" beers listed above. I do like my Heinie's, though. Guiness for when I'm in the mood for a sipping brew.

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Opinions. I was speaking mainly of the "advertised" beers listed above. I do like my Heinie's, though. Guiness for when I'm in the mood for a sipping brew.

LOL! Sipping and brew are not to be used in the same sentence! :lol:
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I never did like the regular Budweiser though the Bud Light Platinum is ok.

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LOL! Sipping and brew are not to be used in the same sentence! :lol:

I think 'Quaff' is the world he was looking for. :su

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Are we sure these drops in sales are not just sales these pis-water giants are losing to actuall brewers like manny's and pyramid? I drink more beer than I used to because you can now buy good beer. (Hint: for those who don't know, if it's advertised on TV it's not good beer)

I am confident that the American craft brew industry playing its part in this. I can see about finding figures later, but breweries that are 'craft beers' oriented have been growing steadily that last 10 years or so. AnheuserBusch has tried to get on the craft beer market by buying other small breweries and attempting to make their own craft beers, but irregardless, a large portion of AB's business is their light lager(s).

This all day. I can't even remember the last time I had an American beer - and that includes the child companies like Corona.

Anyone who isn't 17 should be able to taste the difference between a quality brew and the American stuff. (I have heard this is largely due to how chemically treated the American beers are, in order to speed up the fermentation process to meet large-scale demand)

America has some fairly solid craft beers that are supreme to those mentioned in the article. Which, in my opinion, is why these are declining. Light/pale lagers are meant to appeal to the most people, and that is achieved by essentially being bland. Not too hoppy, not too alcoholic, and not too flavorful.

I don't think much is done to speed up the fermentation process, but certainly AnheuserBusch adds either corn and/or rice sugars to their beers to keep it light in color and taste, and increase the alcohol content a bit. Cheaper ingredients. That being said, it does take a high degree of skill to make the same product, every day, without variation. It's just not that great. Coors, Millers, and Bud are for the most part, are identical beers.

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Coors, Millers, and Bud are for the most part, are identical beers.

Except that Miller tastes the most like puked up urine water.

Edit: Can't say p***, it would seem.

Edited by Imaginarynumber1

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Except that Miller tastes the most like puked up urine water.

Edit: Can't say p***, it would seem.

Doesn't Bud Light?

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Doesn't Bud Light?

Yes. And so does Coors. But Miller tastes the MOST like it.

I know. I've done tests. :yes:

Edited by Imaginarynumber1
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I can't believe how popular Pabst Blue Ribbon has gotten. Now that is some nasty tasting beer.

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I can't believe how popular Pabst Blue Ribbon has gotten. Now that is some nasty tasting beer.

It is one of the most vile liquids on this planet, yet the hipsters treat like ambrosia of the gods.

Oh how I hate hipsters.

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Drink Dos Equis and you'll become the most interesting person in the world, :w00t:

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Not surprising. It wasn't until what, 1987 that craft brewers were allowed in the US? (No, I didn't sleep at a Holiday Inn, I just happened to hear that last night.)

It'll take another 25 years and hopefully we'll hear of the crap beers no more.

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I used to work for the A-B distributor, but it's been 6 years ago. Bad news, it seems.

I used to drink beer, but had to quit last month because of gout. Now it's vodka or wine. I miss the beer, Budweiser, but cannot handle the gout. :cry:

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All of the craft beers now being produced in the USA owe their provenance to Europe. That is not a bad thing because I have quaffed MANY craft beers in the USA and almost without exception have been dellighted and surprised.

From a Euro-palette point of view there is still some work in balancing the flavours between the Hops and Malted Barley to get a respectable Porter, and also the actual use of specific Hop Varieties (appear to be quite restricted in USA) for different brew types.

Looking at beer production now it is hard to believe that in the 1970´s the UK was dominated by the likes of Watneys (a pint of Starlight anyone?) who decimated the beer scene. It was not until CAMRA (Campaign for Real Ale) arrived on the scene that people relised what they had lost.

Today, the UK is back where it should be, producing the best of the best Ales, Porters, and Stouts to be had in the World. I look forward immensely to what the coming years will produce in the USA...

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I don't drink but i miss those Hamm's comercials

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I think the increase of the commercial craft beer is indeed the main reason for the decline of the OP's beer list. I think people starting to brew their own is becoming increasingly popular as well. Heck, one of the hot gifts around here for dad for Christmas is a beer making kit. I'm seeing the things everywhere.

This might be because as my hubby pointed out... He used to brew. But really, it was cheaper to go buy beer, even good beer than it was to brew. It was sort of cost prohibitive and an expensive hobby. Now a days, that has changed. Brewing is now at an almost equal price point to commercial beer. So it's more worth it to brew your own. He's getting carboys for Christmas :)

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Yeah, it's most definately the fact that premium brews are finally available on a wide spread basis. Plus, higher end drinks have pulled away the beer market.

But the funny thing is the title of this article....

These beers are still huge sellers. People are still buying them in droves. To even think that "americans have stopped drinking these beers" is ridiculous.

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Beer is not selling the way it used to. U.S. sales of the beverage declined in four of the past five years. Between 2007 and 2012, beer sales fell by 2.3%, or more than 4.8 million barrels.

This overall drop in beer sales is yet another challenge many of the once most popular U.S. brands have to overcome as they continue to lose market share. According to data provided by Beer Marketer's Insights, American sales of nine major brands, including the once top-selling Budweiser, declined by more than 25% over the past five years. Michelob Light's U.S. sales declined by nearly 70%. The following are the nine beers Americans no longer drink.

9. Labatt Blue

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 28.3%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev S.A./N.V. (NYSE: BUD)
  • Barrels sold (2012): 650,000

8. Budweiser

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 28.8%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 16,800,000

7. Heineken Premium Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 36.7%
  • Brewer: Heineken International
  • Barrels sold (2012): 440,000

6. Milwaukee's Best Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 39.7%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 1,110,000

5. Old Milwaukee

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 54.0%
  • Brewer: Pabst Brewing Company
  • Barrels sold (2012): 400,000

4. Miller Genuine Draft

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 56.4%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 1,390,000

3. Milwaukee's Best Premium

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 58.5%
  • Brewer: MillerCoors
  • Barrels sold (2012): 650,000

2. Budweiser Select

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 61.5%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 625,000

1. Michelob Light

  • Sales loss (2007-2012): 69.6%
  • Brewer: Anheuser-Busch Inbev
  • Barrels sold (2012): 350,000


http://247wallst.com/special-report/2013/12/09/nine-beers-americans-no-longer-drink-2/

Well no wonder when this entire list of bad beers tastes like chilled urine.

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Ya know... I've sometimes wondered who tasted urine in order to make the comparison of it to not good beer. Not that I mean anyone here, but who/how/why did that comparison come up in the first place?

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Ya know... I've sometimes wondered who tasted urine in order to make the comparison of it to not good beer. Not that I mean anyone here, but who/how/why did that comparison come up in the first place?

Hmmm...light beer and urine are approximately the same color and drinking beer certainly leads to urinating...

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