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Waspie_Dwarf

NASA Releases New Earthrise Simulation Video

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NASA Releases New Earthrise Simulation Video

NASA has issued a new visualization of the events leading to one of the iconic photographs of the 20th Century – Earth rising over the moon captured by the crew of the Apollo 8 mission.

The photo known as Earthrise is the first color photograph of Earth taken by a person in lunar orbit. Earthrise is the cover photo of TIME's Great Images of the 20th Century, and is the central photo on the cover of LIFE's 100 Photographs That Changed the World.

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Earthrise: The 45th Anniversary

In December of 1968, the crew of Apollo 8 became the first people to leave our home planet and travel to another body in space. But as crew members Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders all later recalled, the most important thing they discovered was Earth.

Using photo mosaics and elevation data from Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), this video commemorates the 45th anniversary of Apollo 8's historic flight by recreating the moment when the crew first saw and photographed the Earth rising from behind the Moon. Narrator Andrew Chaikin, author of A Man on the Moon, sets the scene for a three-minute visualization of the view from both inside and outside the spacecraft accompanied by the onboard audio of the astronauts.

The visualization draws on numerous historical sources, including the actual cloud pattern on Earth from the ESSA-7 satellite and dozens of photographs taken by Apollo 8, and it reveals new, historically significant information about the Earthrise photographs. It has not been widely known, for example, that the spacecraft was rolling when the photos were taken, and that it was this roll that brought the Earth into view. The visualization establishes the precise timing of the roll and, for the first time ever, identifies which window each photograph was taken from.

The key to the new work is a set of vertical stereo photographs taken by a camera mounted in the Command Module's rendezvous window and pointing straight down onto the lunar surface. It automatically photographed the surface every 20 seconds. By registering each photograph to a model of the terrain based on LRO data, the orientation of the spacecraft can be precisely determined.

Credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio

Source: NASA Goddard - Multimedia

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no stars?

Which, as anyone who isn't totally and utterly clueless about photography would know, is exactly the number of stars there should be in the images.

If you want to talk about conspiracies theories may I suggest the conspiracy theories section. There is a long running topic on the moon hoax theory there. You will find plenty of people there that aren't totally and utterly clueless about photography and would be more than happy explain to you why there are no stars.

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No stars = impossible....sorry.. Not a realistic view ...

Edited by qxcontinuum

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No stars = impossible....sorry.. Not a realistic view ...

Why impossible?

With the film used on the Apollo missions, what aperture setting and exposure time would be needed to image stars?

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The same was showing earth rise. Photographically is impossible to make disappearing items located outside the focusing area. They wouldn't be clear yes...but to vanish entirely hum....

Look at the pic below from hubble

See the stars?

http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/Images/StarChild/space_level2/servicing_hst_big.gif

Edited by qxcontinuum

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But the video released by nasa is a simulation video...meaning not real...my comments are pointless :)

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The same was showing earth rise. Photographically is impossible to make disappearing items located outside the focusing area. They wouldn't be clear yes...but to vanish entirely hum....

Look at the pic below from hubble

See the stars?

http://starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/Images/StarChild/space_level2/servicing_hst_big.gif

DO you know the difference between a camera intended to take pictures of far off planets and suns from the cameras used on the Apollo missions? We're talking more than a few pixels here.

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I'll repeat what I said last time:

Which, as anyone who isn't totally and utterly clueless about photography would know, is exactly the number of stars there should be in the images.

If you want to talk about conspiracies theories may I suggest the conspiracy theories section. There is a long running topic on the moon hoax theory there. You will find plenty of people there that aren't totally and utterly clueless about photography and would be more than happy explain to you why there are no stars.

Now as you clearly know nothing about photography, exposure times and how that affects what is and isn't visible on a photographic image why don't you take my advice, go the the conspiracy section (the clue is in the title) find the Moon Hoax thread and ask why there are no stars in the picture there? You might just learn something.

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Your defensive overreaction to a simple question is quite telling... Why didn't NASA ever adjust exposure and take a photo of the stars from the moon on any of its missions?

Watch the press conference of the Apollo 11 astronauts after they supposedly returned from the moon. Do they act like they just achieved the greatest feat in the history of mankind?

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Your defensive overreaction to a simple question is quite telling... Why didn't NASA ever adjust exposure and take a photo of the stars from the moon on any of its missions?

Watch the press conference of the Apollo 11 astronauts after they supposedly returned from the moon. Do they act like they just achieved the greatest feat in the history of mankind?

Why would they? They were not there to study stars, so why would they try to take pictures of stars?

Not having traveled to the moon, I can't guess what the proper reaction should be of someone who has been to the moon.

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G'day Never_A_Straight_Answer, and welcome to the forum.

Your defensive overreaction to a simple question is quite telling...

Is it? What would you say if Waspie didn't reply? "See, he doesn't have an answer. We must be on to something."? Us poor Apollo supporters...we can't win. ;-)

Why didn't NASA ever adjust exposure and take a photo of the stars from the moon on any of its missions?

A few answers come to mind:

1. Why? NASA's astronauts went to the Moon to study, well, the Moon. That's why they collected rocks and stuff. What would they achieve by taking an ordinary light photo of stars?

2. Taking photos of stars from the Moon is hard - you'd need an exposure time of 30+ seconds. That means you'd need a tripod to keep the camera steady. The weight of the tripod would be the same (more or less) as a piece of equipment which could be used to study the Moon. Anyway, I can see it now - if the astronauts had taken a tripod to the Moon to take photos of the stars, Hoax Believers would either say the photos were fakes or would say that NASA's decision to take photos was a defensive overreaction. ;-)

3. They did take photos of stars - but in ultra-violet light. Photos like that can't be taken on Earth or in Earth orbit, but only outside the Van Allen Belts, like on the Moon: http://apod.nasa.gov...d/ap000701.html

Watch the press conference of the Apollo 11 astronauts after they supposedly returned from the moon. Do they act like they just achieved the greatest feat in the history of mankind?

What exactly were they expected to do? They weren't given media training like sport stars are today, they were emotionally drained from successfully completing a mission they'd been training for years to do, and they'd been through an arduous post-mission debrief. I'm fairly sure Hoax Believers would find grounds to be suspicious of any behaviour the astronauts displayed, whether exuberance or angry resentment.

Edited by Peter B

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Sounds like we have a "We didn't land on the moon" tin hatter amongst us. No stars were in the photo for the same reason no stars were in photos of the men who walked on the moon. The reflection of the sun off the moon's surface was too bright, washed out the stars. Same reason you don't get stars in a daytime photo pointed up to the clouds. The stars are still there.

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Sorry, one more offtopic post.. Hopefully to be continued here.

Your defensive overreaction to a simple question is quite telling... Why didn't NASA ever adjust exposure and take a photo of the stars from the moon on any of its missions?

Watch the press conference of the Apollo 11 astronauts after they supposedly returned from the moon. Do they act like they just achieved the greatest feat in the history of mankind?

I (like all informed folks) know this one!!! Apart from anything else, it's because ..

only an completely uninformed (or deliberately trolling) person would think that taking a pic of stars in DAYTIME on the moon and without a decent (=heavy and big) telescope would be any better than it would be on a clear night here on earth..

That is an absolutely daft idea. It is easily provable that the tiny improvement in clarity of stars viewed from a vacuum is completely and utterly overwhelmed by the huge problems in trying to do stellar photography with a flaming great SUN in the sky and a brightly lit landscape plus LM, LRV, equipment and astronauts. I find it rather sad that some people simply cannot grasp that it was broad, bright daylight on the Moon, and getting away from the sunlight and all the spilled/reflected light was close to impossible. Try looking for stars at a brightly lit sports event at night, and then try to envisage a complete daylit landscape that is not tens, not hundreds, not thousands, but many millions of times brighter plus a dazzlingly bright Sun in the sky. Maybe, like never-a-straight-answer, you just can't get your head around that - if so you should probably pick a different hobby. Suggesting the daytime side of the Moon as an ideal place for stellar photography just shows that the person suggesting it is so far out of their depth it isn't funny.

There's no shame in being out of your depth - it often happens to me (on topics other than Apollo, photography and space sciences...). But when I am, I don't make silly proclamations about how I would have run the Zoo... NASA didn't ask for them to try to take star images* because they knew it would be an utterly useless and time wasting task. Never A Straight Answer - you don't run the Zoo. And the above is one reason why..

Never-straight, if wish to seriously discuss your Apollo denial, here is the thread to do it- why not go over there and bring up your very best reason (I dearly hope that wasn't it..). If you do go over there, I'd suggest you do a little homework at credible sites first. Ie, not Youtube or Aulis..

*there's a reason I put an asterisk here but I'll save it for the other thread - this has gone way offtopic already...

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