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New dinosaur resurrection method proposed

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According to one biochemist, it may one day be possible to 'de-evolve' birds back in to dinosaurs.

While recent research in to the viability of retrieving usable DNA from prehistoric blood-sucking insects trapped in amber has suggested that a real-life Jurassic Park might be an impossibility, elsewhere scientists have been looking at a little known alternative process through which the dinosaurs could be brought back from extinction.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/259759/new-dinosaur-resurrection-method-proposed

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Interesting, but I don't see it ever happening.

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Somehow i don think dinos became birds. The Coelacanth, crocodiles, Nautilus, Horseshoe crab n many others have not changed at all thru the millions of years...

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T-Rex was an evolutionary dead end like every end of Cretaceous Dino. Nothing can de-evolve back into one. Seriously though. Aren't there more important things to do, like save the species we already have such as Rhinos, Snow Leopards and the Orangutan? What about species we wiped out, the Thylacene or Great Auk?

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Chooky, so what you are saying is what you would deem frivolous science should be ended for what you feel isn't.

Edited by MindfieldzX

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T-Rex was an evolutionary dead end like every end of Cretaceous Dino. Nothing can de-evolve back into one. Seriously though. Aren't there more important things to do, like save the species we already have such as Rhinos, Snow Leopards and the Orangutan? What about species we wiped out, the Thylacene or Great Auk?

Absolutely..

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Just to see if they can do it?

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Next they will want to de-evolve us.

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This is an interesting line of thought. It actually came up in a hypothetical discussion I was having with some colleagues a while back. The notion that we will get so good at mapping the genome that we will be able to create creatures at will just by encoding them. Totally far fetched of course, but funny to read it here just a few months later.

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Nice little read.

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That would be ol if they could make a dinosaur

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Next they will want to de-evolve us.

Its not a bad idea, we where smatrher and leaner before.

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Somehow i don think dinos became birds. The Coelacanth, crocodiles, Nautilus, Horseshoe crab n many others have not changed at all thru the millions of years...

Fair enough, but I disagree. I don't see a problem with some organisms changing over time and others not changing much. The key for me is whether the organisms experienced selective pressure which favoured changes of some sort.

I don't know the details of the environments in which these creatures exist, but my understanding of evolutionary theory is that if an organism's environment doesn't change much (like its food sources, temperature, predation threats and so on) then the offspring most likely to survive are those which are most like their parents. That is, the organism won't change much over many generations. But if the environment changes in some way (or perhaps several ways) then the offspring most likely to survive are those which happen to be those most suited to the new conditions, which means it may be offspring which are different from their parents in some noticeable way.

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Dino meat ... the solution to world hunger ...

~ nuff said'

:tu:

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Fair enough, but I disagree. I don't see a problem with some organisms changing over time and others not changing much. The key for me is whether the organisms experienced selective pressure which favoured changes of some sort.

I don't know the details of the environments in which these creatures exist, but my understanding of evolutionary theory is that if an organism's environment doesn't change much (like its food sources, temperature, predation threats and so on) then the offspring most likely to survive are those which are most like their parents. That is, the organism won't change much over many generations. But if the environment changes in some way (or perhaps several ways) then the offspring most likely to survive are those which happen to be those most suited to the new conditions, which means it may be offspring which are different from their parents in some noticeable way.

Hmmm... i do believe there might be some changes. Such as the growth of horns for self defence, growth of claws for climbing/perching, getting furry for protection from cold n lots more... But i don think it be something so drastic as becoming a bird..

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Researchers Suggest Dinos may have also Sported Feathers for Show

By: Leigh Goessl

  • Published: January 8, 2013

A new study suggests that one breed of dinosaurs used feathers to attract members of the opposite sex. The scientists participating in the research analyzed 75-million-year-old fossils of oviraptors, two-legged dinosaurs that had feathers.

The fossils were originally discovered in the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Scientists from the University of Alberta can concluded that feathers played a role in the mating customs of this species of dinosaur.

When the paleontologists working on the project were examining the remains, they found that there were many points in the vertebrae where the dinosaur could flex its muscles. Using technology enhancement in their research, the scientists examining the specimens believe the muscles were large.

Bus-Size Dinosaurs, as Fuzzy as Chicks

By JOHN NOBLE WILFORD

Published: April 4, 2012

Fossils discovered in northeastern China of a giant, previously unrecognized dinosaur show that it is the largest known feathered animal, living or extinct, scientists report. Although several species of dinosaurs with feathers have already been uncovered in the rich fossil beds of Liaoning Province, the three largely complete 125-million-year-old specimens are by far the largest. The adult was at least 30 feet long and weighed a ton and a half, about 40 times the heft of Beipiaosaurus, the largest previously known feathered dinosaur. The two juveniles were a mere half ton each.

  • gobi desert feathered dinos google images link

Dinos were Feathered from way way far back ... now that we know at least ...

T. Rex Protein "Confirms" Bird-Dinosaur Link

<< Back to Page 1 Page 2 of 2

Such comparisons are commonly used by biologists to construct evolutionary "family trees," since similar protein structure is a sign of shared genetic makeup.

Until very recently, however, protein sequences have not been available for ancient organisms such as dinosaurs, since most fossils do not yield proteins or DNA.

T. Rex Related to Chickens

Jeanna Bryner | April 12, 2007 10:10am ET

An adolescent female Tyrannosaurus rex died 68 million years ago, but its bones still contain intact soft tissue, including the oldest preserved proteins ever found, scientists say.

And a comparison of the protein's chemical structure to a slew of other species showed an evolutionary link between T. rex and chickens, bolstering the idea that birds evolved from dinosaurs.

The collagen proteins were found hidden inside the leg bone of the T. rex fossil, according to two studies published in the April 13 issue of the journal Science. Collagen is the main ingredient of connective tissue in animals and is found in cartilage, ligaments, tendons, hooves, bones and teeth. It yields gelatin and glue when boiled in water.

Hmmm ... who wanna invest in my 'Best fried T-rex' fast food chain ?

:)

~

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Most stupid idea of the century, to work on reviving dinosaurs :D

If we go back in time the Earth climate and atmosphere werent even close as they are now. Such big organism was able to sustain itself because atmosphre was rich with oxygen more then its now and many more things were different. So this idea is bad and cant be supported in science bmho. And whats more important - we all know what happens in ' Jurassic park ' movies. Why would it be any different?

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Hmmm... i do believe there might be some changes. Such as the growth of horns for self defence, growth of claws for climbing/perching, getting furry for protection from cold n lots more... But i don think it be something so drastic as becoming a bird..

Not all of them did.

Mainly that was the carnivores. The ones with the stubby arms bent at a familiar "chicken wing" angle.

I wonder why that is...

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Not all of them did.

Mainly that was the carnivores. The ones with the stubby arms bent at a familiar "chicken wing" angle.

I wonder why that is...

Yeah thats really funny. Just imagine t-rex "turning out" to be a "black" bird..

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Somehow i don think dinos became birds. The Coelacanth, crocodiles, Nautilus, Horseshoe crab n many others have not changed at all thru the millions of years...

Its called sub-species, Coelancanth is a fish, Crocodiles arnt dinosaurs

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Hmmm... i do believe there might be some changes. Such as the growth of horns for self defence, growth of claws for climbing/perching, getting furry for protection from cold n lots more... But i don think it be something so drastic as becoming a bird..

It takes millions of years to evolve, not overight, The rapter family seems to have taken that route into flight, they are raptors that had feathers and covered their limbs in a wing like fashion

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they r similar to dinosaurs.. Hence living fossils..

Edited by TheGreatBeliever

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Its called sub-species, Coelancanth is a fish, Crocodiles arnt dinosaurs

They r similar to dinosaurs.. hence living fossils..

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Actually crocodiles and birds are in the archosauria clade.

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They r similar to dinosaurs.. hence living fossils..

so whats your point?

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