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Still Waters

Christmas robins in winter gardens: in pics

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Ealdwita snippet alert.....

When early Christmas cards were produced in the mid-18th Century, they were delivered by postmen wearing bright red coats. These postmen became known as 'robins' or 'redbreasts', and so the bird on the Christmas card was representing the postman who delivered it. Another explanation is the legend that the robin got its redbreast when it was pierced by a thorn from Jesus' crown as He hung on the cross. Sometimes, the robin's association with Christmas became positively dangerous. As Victorian tastes grew more extravagant, robins were even killed to provide real feathers for decorating cards.

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Beautiful pics Still Waters. It's different to see robins in the snow. We usually see them as the birds who announce the coming of Spring. See a lot of cardinals here.

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It's strange to think these pretty little birds, with their cheerful song are amongst the most aggressive of all birds who will viciously defend their territories to the death.

Males and females are so alike even the birds themselves find it difficult to tell the difference. From what I've seen, the rule of thumb (wing?) during mating season is.....If the object of your desire doesn't try to rip you to shreds, then it's probably ok to go ahead and mate!

Who killed c*** Robin?

I said the Sparrow,

With my bow and arrow,

And I killed c*** Robin.

C0ck Robin not allowed?

Edited by ealdwita
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Wow ! Your robins sure are small. Our robins in the US are much larger, it seems.

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Wow ! Your robins sure are small. Our robins in the US are much larger, it seems.

The American 'robin' although bearing the same name, is a member of the thrush family and isn't even remotely related to the European robin. The only similarity is the orange breast patch.

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American robins eat garden worms. Poor things.

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American robins eat garden worms. Poor things.

European robins eat mealworms...(Sometimes straight from your hand)

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