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Uncle Sam

Samuel Colt: The Colt

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Posted (edited)

Is the legend of this gun real? Is this gun actually based on an real legend, an real legend steeped in rumors back in the Wild West? If so, is it possible that there is actually an real Colt that doesn't do what the legend says, but it is real object that was used to bolster Samuel Colt's legacy? This made users of the Colt feel that they don't have to worry about demons, ghosts, and other mythological creatures out there.

Edited by Uncle Sam

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Damn it sure would be cool if it were real but I do see the power that some one would feel holding it in there hands,Invincible.

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I'm pretty sure it was just a marketing ploy... After all, it's hard to prove that you've killed something that is insubstantial...

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While Samuel Colt did invent many unique guns there is not records or mythology about him designing a demon killing weapon prior to its appearance on Supernatural. While the writers on the show do use a lot of real world legends and mythology this particular Dues ex Machina appears to be completely fabricated.

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I've never heard that before. The marketing campian was 'the gun that won the west' right?

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Sam Colt was a very inventive guy. Yes he was innovative in the realm of firearms, but where he really shined was in marketing. He pulled all sorts of stunts to market his firearms. Was known to give guns as bribes to get good press and really no telling how many rumors were started by Mr. Colt himself. "the gun that won the west" title is generally in reference to the Winchester's line of early rifles, namely the 1873 and latter. John Browning designed most of those rifles and was a much more innovative gun designer than Sam Colt ever thought about being.

Mike

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While Samuel Colt did invent many unique guns there is not records or mythology about him designing a demon killing weapon prior to its appearance on Supernatural. While the writers on the show do use a lot of real world legends and mythology this particular Dues ex Machina appears to be completely fabricated.

Yeah, I thought Colt's magic gun was a fabrication of the TV show as well.

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I would suppose if you actually needed one and wanted to subscribe to the mythos you could bless your weapon of choice on an altar to St. Hubert...

Our team has a seiga 12 ...kriss super v..an Ar 10 ..and a couple standard ak type rifles we had that done with. . Just for giggles of course. ..no such thing as monsters...

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I was just wondering if this was an real legend or an marketing ploy by Samuel Colt to sell his guns. Either way, I would like to know the origin unless this is just fabricated legend geared towards Supernatural. I like reading about so called mythical artifacts weapons that have been blessed, the legends of them are usually good stories like Excalibur or other mythical weaponry.

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Wasn't it the first replaceable cartridge revolver? It could shoot and shoot and shoot and shoot and shoot and shoot. You could do some surmountable damage and quickly. I can see some users bragging about it, " I even shot the dead guy's (I killed) ghost!"

Supernatural? Nope x6

Edited by QuiteContrary

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Love it.

The more I read, the more I see.....

Back when I was going to School, and even my son, our education came from Schools, books, etc.

I am 100% convinced the last 10 years ( at least ) education comes from television. Fictional shows or not, it seems not to matter.

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No Magic Colt, but how about a Haunted Remington? Closest I could find to a supernatural fire arm.

From the collection of Dolph McCleish of Monroe, Louisiana who has been a lifelong passionate collector of firearms with particular interest in Remington. His historic Remington Model 8 rifle had been used by Deputy Prentiss Oakley in the ambush of Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow. Oakley, a superb marksman, used this rifle to shoot Clyde Barrow, and it is believed he also shot Bonnie Parker. The gun had carried a presale estimate of $50,000-150,000 and sold for $69,000. When consigning the gun, Dolph had related that an old and great personal friend of his had passed away many years ago and in his will left the gun to him, knowing that he had admired it so much. The widow, in presenting the gun had explained to Dolph that the gun was "haunted" and would shoot by itself. Dolph is an ardent shooter, and shortly after getting the gun, one day decided to take it out and shoot. After loading it, the gun automatically fired by itself and scared him enough so that he put it in his gun room and vowed never to shoot it again. Within a week or so, a relative of his recently departed friend showed up at the door demanding that the rifle should have been given to him, and Dolph, not wishing hard feelings, simply gave the gun up, but two weeks later the relative came back and decided that Dolph should have the gun. Dolph always suspected that the relative had experienced the same mysterious automatic firing of the gun that Dolph had. Nonetheless, Dolph went back to the widow and paid what he felt was a fair price for the gun to avoid any further complications. The gun was one of Dolph's earlier acquisitions,

and it had always been a great source of pride for him and was the subject of numerous magazine articles.

Edited by CaitSith

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When I was in Nam I carried Colt M1911A1 .45 ACP side arm. Designed by the greatest designer of firearms in the world. God bless the name of John Moses Browning.

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Maybe that's the gun they used to kill the bigfoot in that other thread?

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You might try the official fan site for supernatural you might find the info you are looking for.

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When I was in Nam I carried Colt M1911A1 .45 ACP side arm. Designed by the greatest designer of firearms in the world. God bless the name of John Moses Browning.

I love the 1911. I think it is the finest hand gun ever made. We carried them on combat flying missions and I ended up buying myself a Kimber compact that was a pure joy to shoot.

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So far as I know, Colt was not a prolific inventor, his revolvers all being based on an improvement he made in the mechanism to turn and lock a revolver's cylinder in place behind the barrel. The idea of a revolver was already well-established at that time. However, he was an innovative manufacturer, employing many women (more or less unheard of in those days) under relatively enlightened conditions to mass produce his products. And, as others have noted, he was a considerable showman.

The Winchester 1873 was actually an improvement on the Henry rifle (which in turn dated back to the 'Volcanic' rifles and pistols of the 1850s), as were a couple of subsequent Winchester lever-action models. John Moses Browning wasn't associated with Winchester until the mid-1880s; his first lever-action repeater was their model 1886.

Concerning the shooting of ghosts, I suspect Elmer Keith would disapprove. Especially with his being dead and all.

Edited by PersonFromPorlock
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I always assumed it was made up for the show, remember though according to the show, not only did it kill anything and everything supernatural, it was also a key to open the gates of hell :tu:

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Pretty sure it was created just for Supernatural. I don't think they had any real legends of magic all powerful guns to go on and had to make their own so the plot could continue. Supernatural usually doesn't just make things up, but they do change the mythos of what they use by a huge degree. They used a real gunmaker, but not a real gun legend.

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I love the 1911. I think it is the finest hand gun ever made. We carried them on combat flying missions and I ended up buying myself a Kimber compact that was a pure joy to shoot.

I carry a Smith & Wesson 4506, stainless steel model in the .45 ACP. It's a double action and has a positive firing pin block for a safety. Took a little getting used to at first but I saw a lot of guys shoot themselves accidentally when they went to draw their pistols in the heat of battle. We all carried them "locked and cocked", which was pretty much how we were trained to carry them.

I gave consideration to buying a "long slide version" instead of the ACP version but when I checked the ballistics I was shocked to lean there was very little difference. That's because there are still too many old peacemakers from the 1800'2 running around and the last thing the manufacturer wanted was some liquored up redneck deciding to go shoot great-granpappy's old Colt one night and blow his hand off.

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I carry a Smith & Wesson 4506, stainless steel model in the .45 ACP. It's a double action and has a positive firing pin block for a safety. Took a little getting used to at first but I saw a lot of guys shoot themselves accidentally when they went to draw their pistols in the heat of battle. We all carried them "locked and cocked", which was pretty much how we were trained to carry them.

I gave consideration to buying a "long slide version" instead of the ACP version but when I checked the ballistics I was shocked to lean there was very little difference. That's because there are still too many old peacemakers from the 1800'2 running around and the last thing the manufacturer wanted was some liquored up redneck deciding to go shoot great-granpappy's old Colt one night and blow his hand off.

My apologies for swaying the topic at hand,

My understanding of "cocked and locked" was hammer back, safety up. At least this is what was told to me by a retired sheriff when i was a range master back in the 90's. Did the definition of the saying change over the years due to the incidents of accidental discharge? Or was i a victim of "story tellin'" :blush:

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I carry a Smith & Wesson 4506, stainless steel model in the .45 ACP. It's a double action and has a positive firing pin block for a safety. Took a little getting used to at first but I saw a lot of guys shoot themselves accidentally when they went to draw their pistols in the heat of battle. We all carried them "locked and cocked", which was pretty much how we were trained to carry them.

I gave consideration to buying a "long slide version" instead of the ACP version but when I checked the ballistics I was shocked to lean there was very little difference. That's because there are still too many old peacemakers from the 1800'2 running around and the last thing the manufacturer wanted was some liquored up redneck deciding to go shoot great-granpappy's old Colt one night and blow his hand off.

That is a beautiful handgun. Stainless steel or blued? I lost my Kimber as well as a few other handguns in a divorce but still have my Steyr GB (look it up) which is what I carried flying anyways. The transfer bar insured that an ejection wouldn't cause the pin to hit the primer blowing off your leg. Plus it carries 18 in the mag and one in the chamber and takes an incredible amount of abuse. A very tough gun but it is like comparing a HUMVEE to a Porche weapons-wise. I will get another 1911 within the next year because once you shoot one, you can't go back. CCW is useless for me, for the most part, since I still work on military facilities and weapons aren't allowed.

My apologies for swaying the topic at hand,

My understanding of "cocked and locked" was hammer back, safety up. At least this is what was told to me by a retired sheriff when i was a range master back in the 90's. Did the definition of the saying change over the years due to the incidents of accidental discharge? Or was i a victim of "story tellin'" :blush:

1911's have a special cocked and locked but I will let an actual owner explain it since I am not in the club at the moment.

Edited by Merc14

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What that is, is 5hete is what is called a "grip safety" in addition to a standard toggle safety selector. In combat we were trained to disengage the toggle safety and c*** the hammer. That way if you had to pull your side arm all you had to do was grab and fire. Now you had to keep your finger off the trigger or you could shoot yourself in the leg, foot or both. Trouble is if you're in combat you don't always do thing exactly like you should then, if you're lucky, all you have to do is explain that unfortunate self inflicted wound to your CO.

The reason I went with the S&W double action was for the better safety and because I wasn't going into any combat situations. Odds are good I'll have plenty of time to draw and aim.

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What that is, is 5hete is what is called a "grip safety" in addition to a standard toggle safety selector. In combat we were trained to disengage the toggle safety and c*** the hammer. That way if you had to pull your side arm all you had to do was grab and fire. Now you had to keep your finger off the trigger or you could shoot yourself in the leg, foot or both. Trouble is if you're in combat you don't always do thing exactly like you should then, if you're lucky, all you have to do is explain that unfortunate self inflicted wound to your CO.

The reason I went with the S&W double action was for the better safety and because I wasn't going into any combat situations. Odds are good I'll have plenty of time to draw and aim.

My friend who is an Marine been running me through a course recently, he says I still got a ways to go with situations like that, but I do got an amazing reaction time and dead accuracy. Just I need to work on the transition between holster to firing position. Oh how I hate this course, I like shooting different guns, not being drilled about an single type of gun till I mastered it. Not like I am going to have to go to war... really don't know what he are thinking.

Edited by Uncle Sam

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OP...If you are into legendary weapons, then see why the Vikings seen the "Ulfberht Sword" as Magic.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nXbLyVpWsVM

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