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keithisco

ETA

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"At least 100,000 people have marched through the northern Spanish city of Bilbao after a rally in support of jailed Basque militants was banned.

Permission had been granted only for a silent march but some demonstrators shouted slogans in support of the Basque separatist group Eta.

Victims of Eta violence said the march made a mockery of their suffering.

Late last year, Spain's high court ordered the release from prison of several Eta members."

It beggars belief that so many people actualllysupport such tribal terrrorism in Spain, what does ETA want? a tiny state which cannot support itself? A voice in the UN? Well just forget it!!! These people are cold blooded murderers, they want to impose an elitist form of Marxist Govt.

Courtesy BBC: http://www.bbc.co.uk...europe-25700221LINK:

Edited by keithisco
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I'm afraid I have to agree with you. What are their real goals? How would their economy function? If the Spanish workers can't keep up with the British and Germans, how would the Basques keep up?

We have been in the age of different peoples controlling their own fates, though. Look at the Czechs and the Slovakians (who are two different people); and look at all the former Yugoslavian people (Yugo being the main word in the equation).

Not sure how you feel, but there are obvious parallels to what Israel and the Palestinians are going through right now.

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In a unified Europe each little enclave or nationality can have its own "autonomy" with its own parliament and so on as it chooses, but the real government will in the end come out of Brussels.

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I've often thought, and the same goes for all these places with these "Separatist movements" , that the government ought to say to them "ok, you want to be an independent state, do you? well, go on then, just as long as you don't expect us to support you in any way or provide any of the services such as power, fuel etc that we have done until now. At least, not without you paying the full market rate for them same as any other country would. Or of course, us to provide any financial help at all. Let's see how long you last." Call their bluff.

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I've often thought, and the same goes for all these places with these "Separatist movements" , that the government ought to say to them "ok, you want to be an independent state, do you? well, go on then, just as long as you don't expect us to support you in any way or provide any of the services such as power, fuel etc that we have done until now. At least, not without you paying the full market rate for them same as any other country would. Or of course, us to provide any financial help at all. Let's see how long you last." Call their bluff.

Will this apply to Scotland ? if they go independant.
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Will this apply to Scotland ? if they go independant.

Oh, very much so.

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I've often thought, and the same goes for all these places with these "Separatist movements" , that the government ought to say to them "ok, you want to be an independent state, do you? well, go on then, just as long as you don't expect us to support you in any way or provide any of the services such as power, fuel etc that we have done until now. At least, not without you paying the full market rate for them same as any other country would. Or of course, us to provide any financial help at all. Let's see how long you last." Call their bluff.

The problem for the government starts when the region wanting independence is an economical powerhouse. And there is where the problem of Spanish separatist movements lies (at least those to be taken seriously), they are the from most affluent areas and they don't want to share.

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Like Keith i cannot see how they can possibly support themselves? and what can they gain by breaking away. but this is not unusual in Spain over the years a number of regions have wanted 'independence' of some kind. - But hasn't Spain got some strange setup whereby Spain is made up of a large number of 'states' or regions affiliated or amalgamated to Spain as a country? if thats the case wont there always be these separatist movements? would be grateful if anyone can explain this set up. the Spanish constitution it seems, is the glue holding all this together and now n' then they test how strong the glue is. Catalonia is a good example. with such phrases as 'Catalonia is not Spain'.

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The Spanish Constitution of 1978 is the culmination of the Spanish transition to democracy. The constitutional history of Spain dates back to the constitution of 1812. Impatient with the pace of democratic political reforms in 1976 and 1977, Spain's new King Juan Carlos, known for his formidable personality, dismissed Carlos Arias Navarro and appointed the reformer Adolfo Suárez as Prime Minister.[57][58] The resulting general election in 1977 convened the Constituent Cortes (the Spanish Parliament, in its capacity as a constitutional assembly) for the purpose of drafting and approving the constitution of 1978.[59] After a national referendum on 6 December 1978, 88% of voters approved of the new constitution.

As a result, Spain is now composed of 17 autonomous communities and two autonomous cities with varying degrees of autonomy thanks to its Constitution, which nevertheless explicitly states the indivisible unity of the Spanish nation. The constitution also specifies that Spain has no state religion and that all are free to practice and believe as they wish.

Hope that helps.

No, I can't say it makes it much clearer,. no. It sounds a bit like the Trinity; three persons in one indivisible One.

Edited by Colonel Rhubarb
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The Spanish Constitution of 1978 is the culmination of the Spanish transition to democracy. The constitutional history of Spain dates back to the constitution of 1812. Impatient with the pace of democratic political reforms in 1976 and 1977, Spain's new King Juan Carlos, known for his formidable personality, dismissed Carlos Arias Navarro and appointed the reformer Adolfo Suárez as Prime Minister.[57][58] The resulting general election in 1977 convened the Constituent Cortes (the Spanish Parliament, in its capacity as a constitutional assembly) for the purpose of drafting and approving the constitution of 1978.[59] After a national referendum on 6 December 1978, 88% of voters approved of the new constitution.

As a result, Spain is now composed of 17 autonomous communities and two autonomous cities with varying degrees of autonomy thanks to its Constitution, which nevertheless explicitly states the indivisible unity of the Spanish nation. The constitution also specifies that Spain has no state religion and that all are free to practice and believe as they wish.

Hope that helps.

No, I can't say it makes it much clearer,. no. It sounds a bit like the Trinity; three persons in one indivisible One.

Its seems like a complicated set up. its not to hard to envisage Spain falling apart, Catalonia seems the most likely to split, remember last year when over a million people took part in a demonstration, making a human chain spanning 300 mile. i wonder what plans the EU have for any eventuality.

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