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Purple tomatoes soon to be sold in shops

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Genetically modified tomatoes with added nutritional value could soon find their way in to supermarkets.

Despite a general lack of consumer interest in any food that has been genetically modified, the new purple-hued tomatoes are being touted as an improvement over traditional red tomatoes due to the addition of anthocyanin, an antioxidant with cancer-fighting properties.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/261459/purple-tomatoes-soon-to-be-sold-in-shops

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This is interesting. Too bad they don't say which tomatoes they use. Not all purple tomatoes are GMO, some of them are bred.

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So is purple ketchup next? :D

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So is purple ketchup next? :D

I somehow doubt it, lol. People are getting used to drinking oddly colored juices, but I'm pretty sure they still like their ketchup red. Heinz tried the other colors of ketchup a few years back and it ended up being a failure. Of course, they dyed the ketchup instead of using colored tomatoes.

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Buono! Tomato buono tomato, buono, buono, ooh! Tomato! Aka agete midori sagete!? Tomato-mato-mato, hn.

(Delicious Tomato Song) I love tomatoes. Espcially with salt. I hope colour doesn't affect taste. ^-^

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I'm leery.

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No thank you.

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Yeah man!

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I have no problem with GMO flowers like Suntory's blue rose, but the food supply is another matter. I realize that we have been modifying plants for centuries by hybridization and that we have to feed an ever larger human population, but we are experimenting on a whole generation of consumers, saying that it is harmless. We already have many food borne allergies and digestive issues, genetic manipulation may compound this and who knows is there are potential cancer risks associate since that may not show up for decades?

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And in twenty years we will be seeing a new generations of doctors yelling and b****ing about how these purple tomatoes caused cancer to rise 75% in three years...

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So is purple ketchup next? :D

Believe it or not, purple ketchup has already happened.

heinz-ez-squirt-ketchup.jpg

I remember it was around when I was a kid it was around. It was a flop and didn't last long.

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This is interesting. Too bad they don't say which tomatoes they use. Not all purple tomatoes are GMO, some of them are bred.

I thought changing them through creative breeding was genetically modifying them too...

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snip

Edited by rashore

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I thought changing them through creative breeding was genetically modifying them too...

It is, and while I'm unclear on the processes that are really being used in the new GMO, it's clear that it would be difficult to create some of these changes using simple splicing techniques.

I think what bothers me the most is the secrecy that surrounds what they're actually doing to corn, wheat and other large crops. Trade secrecy is important to some extent to protect yourself from competition but it also scares the living bejeezuz out of an already paranoid population. Back in the day if I ate at McDonalds I knew I was rolling the dice a bit when I chose to eat that stuff. But when I buy a head of lettuce and a tomato at the market do I really have to start asking what's in it?

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I thought changing them through creative breeding was genetically modifying them too...

That is true, however now we have the ability in insert genetic material from bacteria, fish or other animals, unrelated plant species, and so forth which goes far beyond selective breeding. At one time I believe they inserted genes from the Arctic Icefish into Tomato plants to make them more cold tolerant. I do not know if they were ever put out for human consumption.

Look up the Suntory Blue Rose (although as of yet it's not a true blue). Breeders have been trying to get the color blue into roses for some time, but the pigments needed to express blue in a flower do not occur in any known rose species, so selective breeding was useless. So they inserted the genetics to express blue from an unrelated plant, (I think they used the RNAi as a transport mechanism but am not sure). It did not quite turn out a true blue, more of a mauve, but by having these genes in the genus Rosa now it provides a starting point to selectively breed a true blue colored rose. There are still other problems to overcome in this case because the internal pH of a rose plant is at a range that does not allow the blue coloration to be expressed very well.

Personally I think this GMO is interesting and perhaps has its place in ornamental plants and in some animals, but the food supply does not seem like a good idea. I may be totally wrong about the health concerns but I avoid consuming it as much as possible.

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Personally I think this GMO is interesting and perhaps has its place in ornamental plants and in some animals, but the food supply does not seem like a good idea. I may be totally wrong about the health concerns but I avoid consuming it as much as possible.

You only have to be a tiny bit right on this one. A drug gets tested and tested before we hand it to humans and say "here, eat this". And even then it goes horribly wrong sometimes. Where is all the testing on gene spliced food? Watching the news while hanging around up in Indiana last year there was a lot of talk about the different types of GM corn. There are many varieties. From drought resistant to bug resistant. And seeds are now getting cross contaminated in processing houses. Here's a question: what do you have to do to make corn bug resistant?

I'm not an alarmist in the least....but I'm alarmed.

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You only have to be a tiny bit right on this one. A drug gets tested and tested before we hand it to humans and say "here, eat this". And even then it goes horribly wrong sometimes. Where is all the testing on gene spliced food? Watching the news while hanging around up in Indiana last year there was a lot of talk about the different types of GM corn. There are many varieties. From drought resistant to bug resistant. And seeds are now getting cross contaminated in processing houses. Here's a question: what do you have to do to make corn bug resistant?

I'm not an alarmist in the least....but I'm alarmed.

(links to all mentioned studies and reviews included in the links - as well as a nifty graphic.)

http://gmopundit.blo...ssessments.html

It is frequently claimed that GM foods are not properly tested, or asserted that few independent studies have been published to establish their safety. Another similar claim made is that the food regulatory agencies rely exclusively of corporate information to decide whether GM food and feed are safe. The further claim is made that very few independent tests relating to GM food safety are done.

This conventional 'wisdom' is wrong.

The modern scientific literature shows that these commonly held opinions are merely myths. Academics Review website comprehensively shows that many of these myths are merely baseless rumours and misinformation. Currently there are near 2000 peer-reviewed reports in the scientific literature which document the general safety and nutritional wholesomeness of GM foods and feeds.

Citations to 600+ of these published studies are collected below (scroll to Exhibit 3). Close to 30% of these publications are produced and funded by organisations that are completely independent of large commercial seed companies. A larger consolidated paper list (see also explanatory comment Making sense of lists of studies by Karl Haro von Mogel on 25 October 2013) has also been curated at the GENERA (Biofortified) database here.

post-106978-0-63435300-1390942919_thumb.

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This is interesting. Too bad they don't say which tomatoes they use. Not all purple tomatoes are GMO, some of them are bred.

The Cherokee Purples. Been growing them for a decade now.

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