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Child of Bast

Remains of medieval traitor's daughter found

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The remains of the daughter of a 14th Century traitor are believed to have been discovered in a church tomb in Herefordshire.

Blanch Mortimer, who died in 1347, was the daughter of Sir Roger Mortimer, who overthrew King Edward II and ruled England for three years.

Work to restore Blanch's tomb at St Bartholomew's Church in Much Marcle uncovered the remains in October.

English Heritage described the find as "astonishing".

Full story

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Sorry am I missing something here?

It was a tomb, what else did they expect to find in there?

They are not even sure it is her, but if there is a record saying it is then whats unusual about that? did they expect her to go somewhere else after being buried, is she the female version of jesus?

"We are quite overwhelmed by the idea Blanch is still in the church."

http://www.bbc.co.uk...cester-25932288

Considering she was in a tomb, where did they expect to find her?

Come back to us when the story changes, like she has moved from the tomb and no one knows where she has escaped to.

Jeeze, it not even as if they have found another version of the Saint Bernadette story, where she had not fully decomposed.

Edited by freetoroam

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My guess is that if she was the daughter of a traitor, people might've concluded that her remains were stolen and dumped elsewhere unmarked. That's what I would've assumed.

Edited by Child of Bast

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My guess is that if she was the daughter of a traitor, people might've concluded that her remains were stolen and dumped elsewhere unmarked. That's what I would've assumed.

In those days, I assume if the church did not mind her being buried with in their walls, the people would not have taken a chance of breaking in and trying to steal her.

I could understand the logic if she were buried outside, but not when tombed inside the church, no doubt with the churches blessings.

Edited by freetoroam

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I get it... They were expecting her remains to be under the tomb, not in it.

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I'm afraid I am rather underwhelmed.

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I think the BBC are being a bit harsh on poor ol' Roger, calling him 'traitor'. Yes, I suppose (technically) he was, but even by contemporary standards, Edward II was a pretty unsavoury character and a fairly large section of medieval Joe Public supported the Mortimers, especially in the London area.

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He certainly wasn't a "traitor," unless he lost later:

"Treason doth never prosper; what's the reason?

For if it prosper, none dare call it treason."

- Sir John Harrington, 1600

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