Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
Still Waters

Family dog seized after baby's death in Wales

21 posts in this topic

A baby girl who died after being savaged by the family dog was just six days old and had only returned home from hospital three days before.

A neighbour told how her frantic mother Sharon John came running to her house screaming: “The dog ate my baby’s head” after her daughter was found dead next to their pet dog Nisha.

http://www.telegraph...h-in-Wales.html

:( Too many of these types of stories in the news nowadays, what an awful thing to happen.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

omg such a horrible news...

a cruel reminder about animals and the animal kingdom....

'domesticated by humans..

wild by nature'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Will be interesting to see the outcome of the autopsy.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Malamutes are one of the best dogs to have with young children. The owner brought the dog home from the pub after someone said they were going to get rid of it.. he obviously knew nothing about its background or its past.

As a breed they are more likely to lick you to death than maul you, the worst dog in the world to own if you want a guard dog.

Another case where the dog is to blame rather than the owners, complete ignorance on the owners side for not looking into why the previous owner was getting rid of it and not knowing its background.

The are a strong willed breed, and need a firm hand and a strong pack leader, plenty of exercise and like to be involved in all the family activities. When I say firm hand I don't mean beating the dog, they do not respond in a positive way to being treat in a cruel manner. So many people buy these little cute balls of fluff and withing just a few months they are bigger than a full grown German Shepherd and they find they can not cope with their demanding needs and then they sell them off a massive loss.

Mine is 7 months old now and a big boy, he is completely non aggressive with any dog or child, he just wants to play, he loves his cuddles, snuggles and gets on well with the cat, the Guinea pid and the degu's.

This poor child would not have had to endure this horrid attack if the owner hadn't been so ignorant.

Sadly the dog will suffer now and the child would still be alive, buying a dog at a pub is the perfect start to owning a loyal family pet, several pints and your always up for making a good decision.

Human ignorance never ceases to amaze me.

4 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Poor baby, Only just bought home only to be left alone with a dog which subsequently killed her. Hopefully the parents will be prosecuted for manslaughter, It was their fault after all. If that had been my baby, Fresh home from hospital, She would not have been out of my sight for a second, Let alone left where the dog could get to her.

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I brought my Malamute home from the pound he was so large, at one to two years old age unknown, that no one was interested in him and he was near the point they were going to put him down. After spending several hours with him, realizing how gentle he was, I decided to bring him home. However, he had been severely abused and I knew he would have serious baggage. I would never have adopted him if I had had children...period. It took quite a while to figure out how to deal with all of his insecurities and what his fear triggers were. In the first year, even a toddler throwing a toy in his direction would have triggered a fear response.

Yes, I would say they were stupid.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, it was their thoughtlessness that got their baby killed.

Pets and babies, especially newborns, can often cause conflicts, and parents should be very observant if they are together, and certainly do not leave them unattended. Many pets hold a grudge against the baby, or better the attention it gets. My parents had to give away their beloved parrot because of her grudge against me (she is live and well).

Edited by FLOMBIE
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree, it was their thoughtlessness that got their baby killed.

Pets and babies, especially newborns, can often cause conflicts, and parents should be very observant if they are together, and certainly do not leave them unattended. Many pets hold a grudge against the baby, or better the attention they get. My parents had to give away their beloved parrot because of her grudge against me (he is live and well).

You just can't tell what the response will be when introducing a new baby, the dog already had been in place for a couple of months before the baby arrived and therefore was working out its position within the pack and then all of a sudden a new arrival that is getting all the attention.

A babies crying or screaming could have triggered something, dogs are intrigued at the sound because its new to them.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I brought my Malamute home from the pound he was so large, at one to two years old age unknown, that no one was interested in him and he was near the point they were going to put him down. After spending several hours with him, realizing how gentle he was, I decided to bring him home. However, he had been severely abused and I knew he would have serious baggage. I would never have adopted him if I had had children...period. It took quite a while to figure out how to deal with all of his insecurities and what his fear triggers were. In the first year, even a toddler throwing a toy in his direction would have triggered a fear response.

Yes, I would say they were stupid.

Michelle, You obviously know yourself that they are not an easy breed and a good knowledge and understanding of the breed is essential before taking them on, they are very demanding but by far one of the best breeds in my opinion.

I posted some photo's on UM pet gallery a few days ago that highlights how quickly they grow and change from cute to massive.

There is no reason with today's technology and the internet that all due diligence can't be carried out before taking on such a strong breed.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh yes they are, Ohelemapit! Growing up we had sort of an unofficial dog rescue so I was exposed to many breeds of dogs. The first sleddog we had was a husky and I fell in love. They are extremely smart and darn near as stubborn as I am. :lol:

My baby passed away a couple of years ago and I still miss him. I saw your pictures and he is beautiful! Have you tried teaching him hand signal commands? They pick up on them very quickly and it always amazes people. My Rocky even knew "good boy" was a wink and he would ever so slightly wag his tail in response if he was in "freeze" mode. We had a language all our own. Incidentally, the "freeze" mode works well if that big happy tail is about to knock something off and break it.

Edited by Michelle
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have quite a few hand signals but I like to keep them to a minimum, most domesticated dogs are relying more on hand signals rather than using their noses, I like to let him be a dog and keep his primal instinks wherever I can.

They are extremely intelligent as you know, right up to a point where they will sometimes ignore the command as if to say 'why should I, I did that yesterday'.

I don't get much tail wagging out of my Loki but that doesn't mean anything negative, tail wagging isn't always a sign of friendliness but can also mean excitement and that as you know isn't always a positive thing.

I am a sucker for any rescue pet, I hate to see an animal in trouble but buying a dog from a pub without knowing it's problems or its background in very rarely going to end up with a good result.. after all we all know the best decisions are made while under the influence of alcohol?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have quite a few hand signals but I like to keep them to a minimum, most domesticated dogs are relying more on hand signals rather than using their noses, I like to let him be a dog and keep his primal instinks wherever I can.

They are extremely intelligent as you know, right up to a point where they will sometimes ignore the command as if to say 'why should I, I did that yesterday'.

I don't get much tail wagging out of my Loki but that doesn't mean anything negative, tail wagging isn't always a sign of friendliness but can also mean excitement and that as you know isn't always a positive thing.

I am a sucker for any rescue pet, I hate to see an animal in trouble but buying a dog from a pub without knowing it's problems or its background in very rarely going to end up with a good result.. after all we all know the best decisions are made while under the influence of alcohol?

You definitely don't want to get into too much of a routine. I incorporate teaching into play time so they are totally unaware they are learning. Even though our house has hundreds of acres of woods behind it we also live in a busy, curvy, two lane highway so it is imperative I make sure any dog I have listens to me at any given time. They are taught not to go out of the yard, but they can get sidetracked by any number of animals. It also kept him from getting bitten by a rattlesnake once. He didn't know what it was and went towards it to sniff. I told him to freeze then back up until he was far enough away not to get bitten. Of course, they can tell by the tone of your voice, even without raising it, how vital a command is. It's important to be consistent, but it doesn't have to be militant.

I agree...taking on the responsibility of a animal is not to be taken lightly or under the influence. Especially if you have children.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is just an unfortunate tragic event. no reason to blame breed, it could have happened with any large breed. especially when adopt adult dog that you know nothing about.

when i was brought home we had GS, he was 3 than. me and the dog basically grew up together, i can't imagine growing up without my dog. because i did not know any other way, still don't. and so my kids grow up with a dog as well.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is just an unfortunate tragic event. no reason to blame breed, it could have happened with any large breed. especially when adopt adult dog that you know nothing about.

when i was brought home we had GS, he was 3 than. me and the dog basically grew up together, i can't imagine growing up without my dog. because i did not know any other way, still don't. and so my kids grow up with a dog as well.

Absolutely no one is blaming the breed here!!! Ohelemapit and I were just having an off topic love fest for our Malamutes.

Things like this not only happen with large breeds. No infant or toddler should ever be left alone, with any size dog, unsupervised under any circumstances no matter how gentle someone thinks their dog is.

We had dogs all my life too, but when my nephew was two one of our older, getting cranky, 20 pound poodles that I had grown up with bit him on the neck, barely missing his jugular. An eighth of an inch to the left, with no one watching, he would have been a goner very shortly.

Malamutes are supposed to be one of the top ten most dangerous dogs. From what I've seen no one ever told them that.

Edited by Michelle
1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a feeling people are just getting dogs without any knowledge or experiance and because everyone else is getting dogs

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a feeling people are just getting dogs without any knowledge or experiance and because everyone else is getting dogs

Nix,

Here is a snippet from a news report:

Neighbours said they often saw Nisha on a lead with the couple. They would tie it up outside a local supermarket where children would stroke it. Ann Williams, 69, said: It wasn't a savage dog. It would let children pet it and it was a very attractive animal.

arrow3.gifView: Read more

Looking at the house in question where the owners lived, it looks like a small back to back or terrace with no definite front garden and a dog like this needs plenty of space and lots of exercise. There was one being sold last month by a single lady with a disability, who lived in a small one bedroom flat with no garden or yard. She bought it and in her own admission didn't realize how big it would get and how much exercise it needed. PATHETIC an no reason to be that ignorant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heard of Susan Diane Eubanks, Frances Newton, Andrea Yates, Lianne Smith, Diane Downs..........,

could the mother in this news be behind the death of her six day old baby?? did she plan the death? did she deliberately left the baby on her own, with the dog untied??

Edited by SkeptcByMindBelievrByHeart

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nix,

Here is a snippet from a news report:

arrow3.gifView: Read more

Looking at the house in question where the owners lived, it looks like a small back to back or terrace with no definite front garden and a dog like this needs plenty of space and lots of exercise. There was one being sold last month by a single lady with a disability, who lived in a small one bedroom flat with no garden or yard. She bought it and in her own admission didn't realize how big it would get and how much exercise it needed. PATHETIC an no reason to be that ignorant.

agreed, though when purchasing a pet, you'll need to know if it will fit in the home, its not that hard to find out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heard of Susan Diane Eubanks, Frances Newton, Andrea Yates, Lianne Smith, Diane Downs..........,

could the mother in this news be behind the death of her six day old baby?? did she plan the death? did she deliberately left the baby on her own, with the dog untied??

no, it's laziness, you want to keep eye on the baby, new to a home and you need time to introduce a pet to a baby. It really is poor from them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On another forum I go to, some are talking about this on there. People are questioning if the dog actually did anything at all. Usually dogs are put down but not this one. Also some said after reading other reports, no traces of blood was found. I tried looking around for more updates on this but can't find any. Can I just mention that there was another dog (a different breed) in the house.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On another forum I go to, some are talking about this on there. People are questioning if the dog actually did anything at all. Usually dogs are put down but not this one. Also some said after reading other reports, no traces of blood was found. I tried looking around for more updates on this but can't find any. Can I just mention that there was another dog (a different breed) in the house.

The police are waiting the forensic reports but you are correct from what I have read. The neighbours saw the dog after the event and there were no traces of blood on it, there is another dog in the household and also 2 young children.

The dog in question will also be subject to tests, they will be checking if it is capable of such an attack, it won't just be locked up in a kennel awaiting the outcome of the report, it will be subject to many tests.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.