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Xynoplas

On Sasquatch and tracking

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Several times people have shown me what they thought were the tracks of Bigfoot, the legendary Sasquatch of the Pacific Northwest. It took very little study to discover that they were fakes. Why? There was no life in them. There was no variation in the pressure releases. I’m not saying Bigfoot doesn’t exist – I hope he does – but so far all the “Bigfoot” tracks I’ve seen were made by pranksters (usually large men) striding through the woods with stamps strapped to their feet.

-Tom Brown Jr.

http://orgoneresearc...oped-margins-2/

If you read enough Bigfoot literature, you are bound to come across claims that the maker of various purported Bigfoot tracks must have weighed hundreds and hundreds of pounds. While this is an interesting issue in and of itself, what is often lost in the discussion is the rearward force that propels the animal forward. Remember, to go forward, a foot must exert a rearward force. In humans, this force is usually concentrated at the ball of the foot, and often creates in a track a “pressure release disk”.

IMG_2231.jpg

The “pressure release disk” is seen immediately posterior of the ball of the foot. Note too, how real toes produce scalloped margins in the track. Now let’s compare my track with two of the clearest tracks from the Blue Creek Mountain – Onion Mountain trackway.

post-2057-1143595251_thumb.jpg

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Keep in mind that despite outer similarities, a foot for supporting a biped that wieghs between 800 and 1000 pounds would actually be quite different mechanicaly. Also while you foot print is in sand do that same thing in very stiff mud or loose topsoil or rocky ground and you will also get different looking prints.

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Certainly a push off is almost always present, and I have said on several occasions here and on other boards that the lack of them makes me suspect if they're real or not. However, Oversword is correct to point out that what foot print are pressed into can make a difference in the way the prints appear. Wet sand prints are going to show more than in thick mud or dried, loose dirt and very often if there is a lot of vegetation of the ground, at best all you'll have is a very vague impression.

Just recently I saw a webpage where a fellow was trying to make a case that Bigfoots wear shoes in cold weather that they fashioned out of "stuff" they fount or dead animal skins. He even had a picture of one he claimed was a Bigfoot shoe.

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While this is an interesting issue in and of itself, what is often lost in the discussion is the rearward force that propels the animal forward. Remember, to go forward, a foot must exert a rearward force.

I don't know that the statement is 100% correct. I've seen many very obese people walking the hallways here at Intel and they don't walk by pushing off, they walk by swinging their legs forward. They plant the foot, lean forward, balance, straighten up, and swing their other leg forward.

I do tend to agree that Bigfoot would walk more like an athlete then a 500 pound obese human, so probably you have an excellent point.

Edited by DieChecker

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Just recently I saw a webpage where a fellow was trying to make a case that Bigfoots wear shoes in cold weather that they fashioned out of "stuff" they fount or dead animal skins. He even had a picture of one he claimed was a Bigfoot shoe.

Wow. Just Wow.

(Big and Tall Shoes is missing out on a whole other clientele)

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Imma throw this out there.

I wear a size 16 EEE (laaaaaaaaaaadies)

and I find the way i distribute pressure in my steps is different than most people.

How did i find this?

Because I'm that creepy guy who watches people at the park.

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Hey, I watch people too. Humans are a hoot to watch......only I'm not creepy, maybe in a few years but now I'm just another old fart watching humans.

It's true that the way a person walks is often a function of their size and weight. A morbidly obese person actually probably has a normal size skeleton and diminished musculature, as a result they're walk is labored, slow and more of a waddle than an actual walking gate that you'll see in a normal size person who's at their ideal weight and exercises regularly. I recall working with a fellow who was so over weight that he had to turn sideways to go in through a standard door. He actually swung one side of his body, paused slightly, then swung the other side in order to walk. What's even more curious is he didn't over eat at lunch or dinner when we worked late.

In the case of a Bigfoot I would imagine they need to keep in top physical shape because nature doesn't favor slothfulness.

Edited by keninsc
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Imma throw this out there.

I wear a size 16 EEE (laaaaaaaaaaadies)

and I find the way i distribute pressure in my steps is different than most people.

How did i find this?

Because I'm that creepy guy who watches people at the park.

I wear a 13, that's one big effen foot you got there Buddy. My guess is someone may have seen your footprints and thought you might have been a Bigfoot.

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I've totally pulled that one before.

because young kids are dumb and I', that kind of a jerk.

shoe buying is b*tch tho

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First two pairs of boots I got issued in basic were elevens. They told me to make do until the bigger ones arrived. I had to live with those things for about ten days.

I wasn't by myself though, a couple other guys had the same problem.

Edited by keninsc
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You don't have to be obese to have a weird gate. Huge muscular thighs will alter it too.

I often wonder why bigfoot prints are not ever turned in, pigeon-toed.

Am I just dreaming when I think I've noticed this as a bit common among athletes, bbuilders with very large thighs?

Edited by QuiteContrary

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But I don't see as many of those as I do morbidly obese to compare them with, so?

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But I don't see as many of those as I do morbidly obese to compare them with, so?

I notice it in certain sports and on actors etc in television/movies. No shortage of them there.

As well as in person.

I just found this:

I guess it isn't the thighs correlate with pigeon toes, but that those who are pigeon toed may be picked for sports and then they develop muscular thighs for the sport.

"While there’s no real research clearly defining the relationship with being pigeon-toed and being a good athlete, there is quite a bit of anecdotal and indirect research evidence to support the notion. In fact, many coaches in sports like football, basketball, soccer and track actually look for pigeon-toed athletes to join their teams. This is because there seems to be a disproportionate number of fast athletes who are pigeon-toed." http://elitetrack.com/blogs-details-3820/

So, I guess it isn't the thighs correlate with pigeon toes, but that those who are pigeon toed may be picked for sports and then they develop muscular thighs for the sport.

However, big muscular thighs can cause an odd gate.

Edited by QuiteContrary

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The odd body builder at the gym is about all I see, and I figured they walked funny because they were spending so much time lifting.

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