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Waspie_Dwarf

GPM Launch

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GPM: Waiting for Launch

The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is poised for launch from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tanegashima Space Center, scheduled for the afternoon of Feb. 27, 2014 (EST).

GPM is a joint venture between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The GPM Core Observatory will link data from a constellation of current and planned satellites to produce next-generation global measurements of rainfall and snowfall from space.

The GPM mission is the first coordinated international satellite network to provide near real-time observations of rain and snow every three hours anywhere on the globe. The GPM Core Observatory anchors this network by providing observations on all types of precipitation. The observatory's data acts as the measuring stick by which partner observations can be combined into a unified data set. The data will be used by scientists to study climate change, freshwater resources, floods and droughts, and hurricane formation and tracking.

Learn more at: http://www.nasa.gov/gpm

Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Lift off!

The H-IIA carrying GPM Core has launched from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tanegashima Space Centre.

I have to leave now for a night shift, but I will post the launch video, if it's available, tomorrow morning (UK time).

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GPM Rocket Launch

A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen launching from th Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center. The GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Source: NASA Goddard - Multimedia

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