Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Waspie_Dwarf

Expedition 38 Crew Begins Final Week on ISS

4 posts in this topic

Expedition 38 Crew Begins Final Week on Station

The six astronauts and cosmonauts of the International Space Station’s Expedition 38 crew began their final week together Monday with scientific research, maintenance tasks and preparations for the return home of three crewmates after nearly six months in space.

With an eye toward their upcoming departure aboard a Soyuz spacecraft, Expedition 38 Commander Oleg Kotov and Flight Engineers Mike Hopkins and Sergey Ryazanskiy performed leak checks on the Sokol launch and entry suits they will wear during the journey back to Earth. The commander also spent some time gathering up items to be packed inside the Soyuz. The three are scheduled to undock from the station March 10 at 8:04 p.m. EDT aboard their Soyuz TMA-10M spacecraft and land southeast of the town of Dzhezkazgan in Kazakhstan at 11:26 p.m. (9:26 a.m. March 11, Kazakhstan time). They arrived at the space station back on Sept. 25 less than six hours after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Eye Exams, Physics and Departure Preps for Station Crew

The International Space Station’s Expedition 38 crew supported a wide range of experiments Tuesday while three crew members get set for their journey back to Earth after nearly six months in space.

Flight Engineer Mike Hopkins spent a good portion of his day in the Kibo laboratory as he removed hardware for the most recent iteration of the Marangoni experiment from the Fluid Physics Experiment Facility. The crew will set up the facility for another Marangoni experiment later this week. By conducting these experiments in microgravity, researchers hope to learn more about the underlying principals of Marangoni convection, which is the flow driven by a surface tension gradient caused by the temperature difference of two liquids. Results from this study may also lead to the production of semiconductors and optical crystals and contribute to various micro-fluid handling techniques, such as those used in DNA examination and clinical diagnostics.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Expedition 38 Crew Gearing Up for Return Home

The astronauts and cosmonauts of the Expedition 38 crew supported medical and material science research Wednesday while three of their crewmates prepared for the trip home after nearly six months in space.

Just after the crew’s usual wakeup time at 1 a.m. EST, Flight Engineer Mike Hopkins got an early start on the workday by providing body samples for the Microbiome study, which takes a look at the impact of space travel on the human immune system and an individual’s microbiome -- the collective community of microorganisms that are normally present in and on the human body. In addition to providing data that will keep future crews healthy, findings from this study could benefit people on Earth who work in extreme environments and further research in the detection of diseases, alterations in metabolic function and deficiencies in the immune system.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Station Crew Preps for Return to Earth, Repairs Recycling System

With less than five days left before half the crew aboard the International Space Station departs, the six astronauts and cosmonauts of Expedition 38 performed maintenance on station systems, conducted research and packed items for the journey back to Earth.

Following the crew’s daily planning conference with the flight control teams around the world, Flight Engineer Mike Hopkins went to work in the station’s Tranquility node to begin the removal and replacement of a catalytic reactor inside the Water Recovery System. Hopkins temporarily removed the COLBERT treadmill and rotated the large, refrigerator-sized rack that houses the recycling system to gain access to the connections at the front and back of the rack. Flight Engineer Rick Mastracchio then joined Hopkins to help remove the old catalytic reactor and install a new one. The two NASA astronauts also installed a temporary filter between the reactor and the microbial check valve to support a system flush of the replacement unit. Part of the station’s Environment Control and Life Support System, the Water Recovery System recycles condensation and urine into drinkable water.

arrow3.gifRead more...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.