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Yamato

Rhino Poaching Deaths Reach Record Highs

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Posted (edited)

FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 5, 2013 file photo, rangers of the Kenya Wildlife Service and Kenya Forest Service take cover while engaging in a mock ambush as they stage a demonstration of the skills they have learned over the last few days of joint anti-poaching training with Britain's 3rd Battalion, The Parachute Regiment, in the forest near Nanyuki, Kenya.

Famed scientist and founding former chairman of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) Richard Leakey is urging Kenya's president to invoke emergency measures to protect the country's elephants and rhinos and said Wednesday, March 19, 2014 that the KWS had been infiltrated by people enriching themselves off poaching, that poaching ring leaders were known, but that the government has taken no action. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)

http://news.yahoo.co...high-slideshow/

Anti-poaching groups have got to crack down on these scumbags. Some bullets in some heads will get some attention on this issue and make these poachers think twice before they poach again. Now I know these poachers are poor and black in rusty old pickup trucks, and not filthy rich with fleets of big shiny ships paid for by the government, and so when a bullet rips through their heads and ends their lives nobody here is going to care, much less even know about it from thousands of miles away. But the fear of death needs to become a genuine concern for these crooks where they live and where they poach.

Notable in the article above is that "the government has taken no action". Again, when governments fail to step up and enforce their own rules and regulations, the burden falls upon civil society to fill that gap. Much like US "Letters of Marque and Reprisal", like the infamous "Wanted Dead or Alive" posters from the Old West, African governments should put out contracts on these criminals and pay some ransoms on the receipt of their capture or death. The point being that the risk for these poachers needs to increase while the motivation for stopping them should as well.

Edited by Yamato

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I think a benevolent gesture to try and create work for these people, perhaps capitalising on Africa's Unique fruit and vegetable indigenous products and game parks would be a far better way to go than a bullet to the head. The hard part would be convincing the Government to spend the money appropriately, and not on themselves. But I find most worthwhile things in life seem to take effort. Perhaps it might motivate the people to actually work toward something, give them something to hope for, I honestly doubt they enjoy poaching, considering they will probably die doing it. That is where the globe might consider Intervening with the UN or something. Maybe the good Old US of A could "insist" the country take a fairer approach to its citizens. And give the Rape Ax out to all women for free at the very same time.

Killing things is not always the answer Yam. Violence is not always the answer either. Do you ever solve problems without promoting the ending of lives? Seriously, I'd see a professional about that obsession. It's not healthy to want to kill everything.

I always wondered how the birthplace of man could be so behind the rest of the planet. What the hell happened there?

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Well said. I hate poachers.

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Posted (edited)

I think a benevolent gesture to try and create work for these people, perhaps capitalising on Africa's Unique fruit and vegetable indigenous products and game parks would be a far better way to go than a bullet to the head. The hard part would be convincing the Government to spend the money appropriately, and not on themselves. But I find most worthwhile things in life seem to take effort. Perhaps it might motivate the people to actually work toward something, give them something to hope for, I honestly doubt they enjoy poaching, considering they will probably die doing it. That is where the globe might consider Intervening with the UN or something. Maybe the good Old US of A could "insist" the country take a fairer approach to its citizens. And give the Rape Ax out to all women for free at the very same time.

Killing things is not always the answer Yam. Violence is not always the answer either. Do you ever solve problems without promoting the ending of lives? Seriously, I'd see a professional about that obsession. It's not healthy to want to kill everything.

I always wondered how the birthplace of man could be so behind the rest of the planet. What the hell happened there?

When I figure out how it is that violence can be intellectually excoriated from the welfare of animals and even in matters involving extinction and the continuation of species as is the case here, maybe we'll get there.

The greater underlying threat to these coming extinctions is the destruction of habitat. So I'm open to ideas that would prevent that, but not with a special interest in providing alternative employment to poachers. Again this hearkens back to the other poachers, rich on government welfare, who still break the law, who have skills enough to get another job, and a flourishing super-powered economy from which to find it, but refuse to do so anyway. At the point when the poacher picks up a rifle and shoots it at another rhino, their job in the world should be prisoner, if not worm food.

And I don't know why you're telling me that I'm the one that doesn't already know "killing isn't always the answer". That's some thick irony coming from you after all we've discussed. I've reminded you of the fact that Sea Shepherd has never killed anyone but you come back making clear that distinction means nothing to you. So that's not the difference that matters here to you at all. Unlike you, it means a lot to me. If Sea Shepherd was killing people on purpose, I couldn't support them like I do. Depending on circumstances, some isolated death may not reflect the purpose, intent, policy, et.al. of the organization. But if killing poachers was a stated policy, then hell no. There's a massive difference between non-violent intervention that doesn't kill anyone and doesn't even intend to hurt anyone, and training anti-poachers with arms and military tactics.

But that doesn't make me a "fan boy" of African authorities because I give them more leeway including the use of deadly violence in preventing this problem. There's no TV show determining what I think here either. And we can talk about woulda shoulda couldas till the cows come home and that's not going to change anything. Rhinos are going extinct. It's past time to poop or get off the pot.

Edited by Yamato

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A small deer was all but extinct in Africa. It was the game hunting industry that brought it back from the brink of extinction. Game Hunting has produced many viable population in species that were suffering and has produced many healthy specimens that return to the wild. It is the game hunters best interests to make sure a species survives. The deer being almost extinct brought a high price to hunt to due to it's rarity, backwards thinking, but that backwards thinking created a demand that could only be satisfied by repopulating the species. As a result we all won, the deer is no longer endangered, people can hunt them without having an impact on the species, and hunting is tightly controlled to certain areas, and even then, not every species is up for hunting. The locals gained fruitful employment, human animal relations improved because the Lions now brought money as opposed to killing stock, making them valuable not a pest, people make some money and can live better lives, Zoologists have something to keep an eye upon that is improving for a change.

Sometimes the solutions are not what one might expect. And they do not require mass murder.

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Well said. I hate poachers.

We all do, but there has to be a better solution than violence. A bullet to the head does not solve everything.

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Posted (edited)

And I don't know why you're telling me that I'm the one that doesn't already know "killing isn't always the answer". That's some thick irony coming from you after all we've discussed. I've reminded you of the fact that Sea Shepherd has never killed anyone but you come back making clear that distinction means nothing to you.

The Wikileaks release proves that The Sea Shepherd has increased the kill to a point where what the Sea Shepherd says they save these days was the total of Japans catch before they got involved, there is no doubt that the Sea Shepherd are making things worse each year.

Watson carries guns, and has said so, Bethune says they carry guns, they shot at Faroe Islanders and used Limpet mines to sink the Sierra.

1991: Scott Trimmingham, president of Sea Shepherd quits in protest. “We had rules about not

hurting anyone, about not using weapons. I left because those rules and that philosophy seems to

be changing.” Outside magazine (Sept. 1991). Paul Watson admits there are arms on board “Sea

Shepherd”. “We confront dangerous people. As the captain, it is my responsibility to protect the

lives of my crew ... Therefore, I have prepared myself for the possibility of defending my crew in

a situation that could go never occur, but if it does I will use firearms to first intimidate and then

to defend,” Watson tells the Los Angeles Free Weekly (April 24, 1992).

1980: The “Sierra” is sunk in Lisbon harbour. Sea Shepherd claims responsibility. Investigation

shows limpet mines used to blow up the vessel.

1986: Sea Shepherd attempts to stop Faroe Islands pilot whale harvest. Using rifles, Sea

Shepherd activists shoot at Faroe Islands police in an attempt to sink their rubber dinghies. The

vessel “Sea Shepherd” was ordered to leave Faroese territorial waters. The police report of 7

October 1986 states: “One of the rubber dinghies was attacked directly by a “Speed Line” line

rifle. The attack … endangered the lives of the police crewmembers ... and signal flares

containing phosphorous was thrown at the police. At a later stage the Sea Shepherd used “toads”

(rotating iron spikes, pointed and sharp at both ends) against the rubber dinghies … petrol was

poured over the side of the ship and signal flares were thrown from the “Sea Shepherd” in an

attempt to set the petrol on fire.”

1993: Paul Watson orders the crew on board the Sea Shepherd vessel “Edward Abbey” (formerly

US Navy) to open cannon fire at a Japanese fishing vessel. Sea Shepherd crew do not carry out

the order, but instead fire a shot across the bow of the Japanese vessel. The Japanese vessel does

not stop. (Recorded by Yorkshire Television Documentary “Defenders of the Wild – Ocean

Rider”.)

Edited by psyche101

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