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Still Waters

Will technology find the Tasmanian tiger?

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TASMANIAN tiger hunter Mike Williams is confident evidence of a living thylacine will emerge sooner rather than later because of the growing popularity of crash cameras in cars.

Mr Williams, who led an international team of naturalists searching for the thylacine last year, has urged Tasmanian motorists to invest in the technology.

http://www.themercur...1-1226862706392

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I really hope they find one.

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So do I, but the chances are VERY remote, but never say never!

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It would be miraculous if the thylacine managed to survive, they were an amazing species.

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Perhaps, but the odds are against it.

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So THIS is why Tony Abbott is cutting down all the old growth forests, to drive the Tassie Tigers out into the open. It all makes sense now, I just thought it was because he was a merchant banker who was at the beck and call of the Industrialist Lobbies.

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Thylacine sounds like a drug.

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It would seem to me a trail camera with a bait trap would be more likely to catch a thylacine. Still, it is worth a try if people will send in pics of what they almost run over....

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It would be neat to find one, but not by running one down with a car. What if it were the last the thylacine...

"Look, we found the thylacine, and forced it into extinction again!"

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"Look, we found the thylacine, and forced it into extinction again!"

Which begs the question, was it really extinct the first time then :whistle:

To be fair though, if that was the last one it was already doomed to begin with... :tu:

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I fear of the irony that a crash camera will record either the car itself or an incoming car hitting a Thylacine.

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Posted (edited)

Which begs the question, was it really extinct the first time then :whistle:

It is listed as extinct, isn't it? That means it's extinct, doesn't it?

Edited by Hida Akechi
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Which begs the question, was it really extinct the first time then :whistle:

It would be facinating if it weren't. If they are still being sighted 80 years after the last one was documented then there's obviously a large enough breeding population left. It's not as far fetched as, say a large, hairy bi-ped roaming around the pacific northwest, I suppose.

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Posted (edited)

in some ways i hope even in the unlikely event their still alive they don't discover them as the species would quickly become under threat again either by tourists trying to take photos, illegal hunters etc.

look what happened to our only "native" pygmy hippo killed by mistaken identity such a thing could easily happen to a Tasmanian tiger.

http://www.theage.co...91116-ii3b.html

Edited by evil_kenshin
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It would be nice to have a domesticated one and watch people's eyes pop out of their heads when I take it for a walk through the park.

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in some ways i hope even in the unlikely event their still alive they don't discover them as the species would quickly become under threat again either by tourists trying to take photos, illegal hunters etc.

look what happened to our only "native" pygmy hippo killed by mistaken identity such a thing could easily happen to a Tasmanian tiger.

http://www.theage.co...91116-ii3b.html

Not me. I want to see one. I find them fascinating.

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It would be nice to have a domesticated one and watch people's eyes pop out of their heads when I take it for a walk through the park.

Especially when it yawns. Have you seen that maw on it? Geez, that would scare anyone!

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Especially when it yawns. Have you seen that maw on it? Geez, that would scare anyone!

Excactly....It would make the meanest Pitbull run away.

Thylacine-with-mouth-agape.jpg

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It would be nice to have a domesticated one and watch people's eyes pop out of their heads when I take it for a walk through the park.

Bearing in mind that a practical definition of 'domesticated' is 'Housebroken, and knows not to eat the baby'.

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TASMANIAN tiger hunter Mike Williams is confident evidence of a living thylacine will emerge sooner rather than later because of the growing popularity of crash cameras in cars.

Id think if they were hanging out by roads, a car would of hit one by now and that animal stands out so much that a car hit would of been reported. Maybe could exist still if they are very shy (thou I very much doubt they still exist).

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It would be facinating if it weren't. If they are still being sighted 80 years after the last one was documented then there's obviously a large enough breeding population left. It's not as far fetched as, say a large, hairy bi-ped roaming around the pacific northwest, I suppose.

While I agree it would be fascinating if the Thylacine had survived, I would put most (if not all) those sitings down to a triumph of optimism over good observation skills.

I pointed out on another thread discussing the animal that the amount of wilderness left in Tasmania is unlikely to be large enough to support a viable population of Thylacines. It may well be that there were still a small number of them left in the wild after the last one in captivity died, but in that case the wild population is unlikely to have survived more than a decade or so after that.

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OMG!! They just managed to come back in time to go extinct from global warming.

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I would not be surprise if the species never did go extinct. We think we have the world mapped out but there are still places we have not explored. I wouldn't rule anything out of the realm of possibility.

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I would not be surprise if the species never did go extinct. We think we have the world mapped out but there are still places we have not explored. I wouldn't rule anything out of the realm of possibility.

I think it would be OK to rule some things out. Like bigfoot, the Loch Ness monster and Chupacabre.

Thylacine existance is still possible though. Not likely, but possible.

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