Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1
DeWitz

Epistemology

6 posts in this topic

In one of his pre-retirement public lectures, eminent theobiologist Clyde P. Fesmire opined, "What we know pales in comparison to what we must trust in. If it's true we may know it, or not. If we don't, it still may be true. Think about gravity. Or don't. It's still there."

Or something like that--my notes from that talk are rather coffee-stained.

The point, which I raise as a question, not a statement, is this:

"When rationality, healthy skepticism and investigation leave us with mystery, when is it epistemologically 'kosher' to make the leap to fideism, or just a simple trust in the positive development of the universe?"

Or, stated differently, when (if ever) does faith have a role in responding to (any) mystery?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Faith is for the future, it can be a hope (that everything will be ok), a firm knowledge (based on the results faith has performed in the past) and of course it is a mystery because we don't know how everything will transpire.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think in a practical sense, a simple trust in the positive development of the universe. We may have a compitent enough understanding of the universe such that there will be no unexpected surprises for us in the future, such as the theory of relativity and quantum mechanics were counterintuitive surprises when these concepts were first introduced.

The mysteries that remain may only be in discovering the details.

I also think the above statements may be in future known as famous last words. (Gen. Custer's famous last words: "I think they're friendly indians.")

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"when (if ever) does faith have a role in responding to (any) mystery?"

When it suits its own agenda is the first thought that comes to mind.

Yet faith comes in all guises, not only the Religious approach .

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Faith is not a virtue.

Have faith in Nigerian prince e-mails.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me it's a non sequitur. Or to quote Douglas Adam;

"Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?"

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 1

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.