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Human suspended animation trials

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Doctors will try to save the lives of 10 patients with knife or gunshot wounds by placing them in suspended animation, buying time to fix their injuries

NEITHER dead or alive, knife-wound or gunshot victims will be cooled down and placed in suspended animation later this month, as a groundbreaking emergency technique is tested out for the first time.

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"After we did those experiments, the definition of 'dead' changed," says Rhee. "Every day at work I declare people dead. They have no signs of life, no heartbeat, no brain activity. I sign a piece of paper knowing in my heart that they are not actually dead. I could, right then and there, suspend them. But I have to put them in a body bag. It's frustrating to know there's a solution."

http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22129623.000-gunshot-victims-to-be-suspended-between-life-and-death.html?full=true#.UzVyu6If7XR

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Interesting but i am afraid that the technique used is not assuring revival. Once they replace the blood is all gone.

The technique involves replacing all of a patient's blood with a cold saline solution, which rapidly cools the body and stops almost all cellular activity. "If a patient comes to us two hours after dying you can't bring them back to life. But if they're dying and you suspend them, you have a chance to bring them back after their structural problems have been fixed," says surgeon Peter Rhee at the University of Arizona in Tucson, who helped develop the technique.

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Can't wait to see what thresults are.

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Yes I really hope we can induce a suspended state, would be most useful when we eventually travel further in space!

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Might shed some insight into the supposed "near death experience"

Next will be day trips to visit friends and family on the "other side"

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Hmmm, maybe this is an april fool, the total blood replacement thing sounds unlikely.

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Hmmm, maybe this is an april fool, the total blood replacement thing sounds unlikely.

Nope not an April fool, was posted way before then, if you looked

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Somewhat similar practices of suspending or slowing certain cellular activity has been in practice for fifty years by inducing moderate hypothermia before open-heart surgeries and more recently following cardiac arrest. While not removing the blood, these patients are indeed comatose.

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Can't wait to see what thresults are.

Probably longer wait times in Hospital Emergency Rooms. :whistle:

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Posted (edited)

Probably longer wait times in Hospital Emergency Rooms. :whistle:

:w00t: Crap, you are probably right. "Ice him up and wait till there is a bed open."

Edited by Merc14
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Interesting but i am afraid that the technique used is not assuring revival. Once they replace the blood is all gone.

The technique involves replacing all of a patient's blood with a cold saline solution, which rapidly cools the body and stops almost all cellular activity. "If a patient comes to us two hours after dying you can't bring them back to life. But if they're dying and you suspend them, you have a chance to bring them back after their structural problems have been fixed," says surgeon Peter Rhee at the University of Arizona in Tucson, who helped develop the technique.

OK - When this works on people, I wonder how many near-death experiences will be related. If someone finds themself in Hell, will they try to atone? Come to think of it, no one ever says they were in Hell, just the tunnel of light. My Mother did claim she saw Jesus when she had her by-pass surgury many years ago. She also had a pacemaker put in. She send Jesus told her she had more to do. She's going to be 90 and still going. All of her doctors keep marvelling tat she's still alive. I'm not very religious, but it's keeping her going.
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She send Jesus told her she had more to do.

But what does she do? And has she kept doing it? As Jesus said?

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Pickle? Well at least the survivors if any would have something to chew on...

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It will certainly increase the numbers of NDEs reported if successful. Here's hoping some lives can be saved with this technique.

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But what does she do? And has she kept doing it? As Jesus said?

At 90 years old it doesn't really matter what she does, bless her heart. :tu:

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At 90 years old it doesn't really matter what she does, bless her heart. :tu:

True but the post said Jesus told her..."many years ago"

quote: My Mother did claim she saw Jesus when she had her by-pass surgury many years ago. She also had a pacemaker put in. She send Jesus told her she had more to do. She's going to be 90 and still going.

So if Jesus said she had 'more to do' many years ago, its a valid question, with an assumption that she had to DO something. Right?

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Simply to 'live' is good enough...

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Could this apply to patients with say a terminal disease? Say cancer or AIDS. Could we possibly find some sort of cure or way to ensure the life of someone with a terminal disease?

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Posted (edited)

Could this apply to patients with say a terminal disease? Say cancer or AIDS. Could we possibly find some sort of cure or way to ensure the life of someone with a terminal disease?

Good question. They talked about a 4-6 hour period but one has to wonder how far they can push that envelope.

Edited by Calibeliever

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replacing all of a patient's blood with a cold saline solution, which rapidly cools the body and stops almost all cellular activity. "If a patient comes to us two hours after dying you can't bring them back to life.

This is lifted straight from an episode of 'The 6Million $ Gringo' in which Jamie Sommers was declared dead, but revived by cryogenics... she went on to kick tuhis with her own bionics.

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We really need to update our definition of death. The heart ceasing to beat shouldn't be called 'dead' because technically it's not. 'Dead' should be a term meaning all brain activity is gone and organs can no longer function. In that definition these people are not 'dead', they are in a suspended state.

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