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docyabut2

3,300-year-old tomb with pyramid

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I am afraid to post, incase its an April fools.

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CAIRO -

'A German archaeologist said Tuesday that he has found

what could be the earliest known human writing -

records of linen and oil deliveries made about 5,300

years ago during the reign of a king named Scorpion in southern Egypt.

empty10.gifThe discovery throws open for debate a widely held belief among

historians that the first people to write were the Sumerians

of the Mesopotamian civilization sometime before 3000 B.C.'

http://www.trussel.com/prehist/news95.htm

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I don't think this was a tomb. I don't believe that the sandstone sarcophagus is a burial instrument. I think it is more about resonance, and the ability to access OBEs. I think there were spiritual teachings and initation practices that used the sandstone sarcophagus as a tool for higher soul learning. My bet is that the chamber it was found in had a specific sort of resonating stone in it, like a marble or granate or something.

Imagine, you have been purfied by water, anointed with oils. You have fasted for two days. You are dressed in white thin material. Your teachers lead you to the chamber, descending so that you may also ascend at a certain point. You are placed in the sandstone sarcophagus, covered with the lid, while the drums and horns play around the sandstone box. You vibrate inside the box, and your soul rises and joins with eternity for a while, long enough to gain access to grand knowledge. After a certain amount of time, your teachers stop the beating and music, and they give you time to descend back to your flesh. Then you are removed from the box. You share with them the knowledge that you have gained, for knowledge should be communal.

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Posted (edited)

I am afraid to post, incase its an April fools.

A wise man can be a fool. A fool cannot be a wise man. (probably I butchered Shakespeare or Seneca)

Edited by regeneratia

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regeneratia,

Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding. (Proverbs 17:28)

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If this find has been ransacked at least twice and reburied by the dessert, I wonder what other treasures are still yet to be (re)found.

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A wise man can be a fool. A fool cannot be a wise man. (probably I butchered Shakespeare or Seneca)

Judging by King Lear, I'd say you're butchering Shakespeare.

--Jaylemurph

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CAIRO -

'A German archaeologist said Tuesday that he has found

what could be the earliest known human writing -

records of linen and oil deliveries made about 5,300

years ago during the reign of a king named Scorpion in southern Egypt.

empty10.gifThe discovery throws open for debate a widely held belief among

historians that the first people to write were the Sumerians

of the Mesopotamian civilization sometime before 3000 B.C.'

http://www.trussel.c...hist/news95.htm

The Egyptians have claimed this now, for a few years, long before this

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CAIRO -

'A German archaeologist said Tuesday that he has found

what could be the earliest known human writing -

records of linen and oil deliveries made about 5,300

years ago during the reign of a king named Scorpion in southern Egypt.

empty10.gifThe discovery throws open for debate a widely held belief among

historians that the first people to write were the Sumerians

of the Mesopotamian civilization sometime before 3000 B.C.'

http://www.trussel.c...hist/news95.htm

The Egyptians have claimed this now, for a few years, long before this

Also, define 'writing'. Cave painting is a form of recording thoughts symbolically. I understand the modern definition of a written language but it's always seemd a bit pedantic.

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I don't think this was a tomb. I don't believe that the sandstone sarcophagus is a burial instrument. I think it is more about resonance, and the ability to access OBEs. I think there were spiritual teachings and initation practices that used the sandstone sarcophagus as a tool for higher soul learning. My bet is that the chamber it was found in had a specific sort of resonating stone in it, like a marble or granate or something.

Imagine, you have been purfied by water, anointed with oils. You have fasted for two days. You are dressed in white thin material. Your teachers lead you to the chamber, descending so that you may also ascend at a certain point. You are placed in the sandstone sarcophagus, covered with the lid, while the drums and horns play around the sandstone box. You vibrate inside the box, and your soul rises and joins with eternity for a while, long enough to gain access to grand knowledge. After a certain amount of time, your teachers stop the beating and music, and they give you time to descend back to your flesh. Then you are removed from the box. You share with them the knowledge that you have gained, for knowledge should be communal.

Very interesting read

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Also, define 'writing'. Cave painting is a form of recording thoughts symbolically. I understand the modern definition of a written language but it's always seemd a bit pedantic.

Cave paintings are not a form of writing. They're perhaps more on the order of Native American winter counts, which are strictly pictographs serving as mnemonic devices.

True writing employs some sort of script representing the sounds of one's language, as well as grammatical features. In other words, writing is a means to make one's language visible.

The link in fluxed's earlier post is actually many years old. The discovery dates to the 1990s, when Günter Dreyer was excavating at the ancient pharaonic necropolis of Abydos. He unearthed Tomb U-j, which contained many little ivory dockets with hieroglyphs on them. Egyptologists still debate how they ought to be interpreted and not all of Dreyer's conclusions are accepted, but they still stand as the oldest attestation of Egyptian hieroglyphs and were clearly serving as a fully functioning script as early as 3400 BCE.

Debate still continues as to whether Egyptian hieroglyphs or Sumerian cuneiform represent the world's oldest writing. Their earliest appearance date to almost the same time, so it could go either way. Of course, Egyptologists claim its hieroglyphs and Sumeriologists claim its cuneiform.

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Posted (edited)

regeneratia,

Even a fool, when he holdeth his peace, is counted wise: and he that shutteth his lips is esteemed a man of understanding. (Proverbs 17:28)

I am not a bible fan, at least not the one you are quoting from., for I left that cult somewhere around the age of 17. But it was nice of you to provide it. Your intent is sweet.

Edited by regeneratia

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Posted (edited)

Cave paintings are not a form of writing. They're perhaps more on the order of Native American winter counts, which are strictly pictographs serving as mnemonic devices.

True writing employs some sort of script representing the sounds of one's language, as well as grammatical features. In other words, writing is a means to make one's language visible.

The link in fluxed's earlier post is actually many years old. The discovery dates to the 1990s, when Günter Dreyer was excavating at the ancient pharaonic necropolis of Abydos. He unearthed Tomb U-j, which contained many little ivory dockets with hieroglyphs on them. Egyptologists still debate how they ought to be interpreted and not all of Dreyer's conclusions are accepted, but they still stand as the oldest attestation of Egyptian hieroglyphs and were clearly serving as a fully functioning script as early as 3400 BCE.

Debate still continues as to whether Egyptian hieroglyphs or Sumerian cuneiform represent the world's oldest writing. Their earliest appearance date to almost the same time, so it could go either way. Of course, Egyptologists claim its hieroglyphs and Sumeriologists claim its cuneiform.

I think cave painting can indeed be a form of conversation and communication, and could well be, in the broadest sense, words or a form of writing. I am not sure on this, for this is not my area of expertise. However, I did read a book once that told of the Aborigines relating to the author that a simply depiction can express an entire story, from start to finish, by reading the nuances of the lines and curves, the background rock. You know, a brain stretched to a new idea never goes back to it's original condition. I am forever expanded by those few words he related on how to view art, especially primative art.

There is nothing wrong with conceptual communication, and/or the use of icons to express a thought, a concept.

I wonder what Leonard Schlain would say, may all the gods rest his soul.

Edited by regeneratia
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Judging by King Lear, I'd say you're butchering Shakespeare.

--Jaylemurph

I even butcher the two willie sonnets I have memorized. Tho I love those plays, his writings, I will never cease to butcher them when repeating a memorization.

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I think cave painting can indeed be a form of conversation and communication, and could well be, in the broadest sense, words or a form of writing. I am not sure on this, for this is not my area of expertise. However, I did read a book once that told of the Aborigines relating to the author that a simply depiction can express an entire story, from start to finish, by reading the nuances of the lines and curves, the background rock. You know, a brain stretched to a new idea never goes back to it's original condition. I am forever expanded by those few words he related on how to view art, especially primative art.

There is nothing wrong with conceptual communication, and/or the use of icons to express a thought, a concept.

I wonder what Leonard Schlain would say, may all the gods rest his soul.

Cave paintings or rock art can definitely be a form of communication, but that's not the same as writing. Let's use your example of the depiction used by the Aborigine. As with all societies before they develop a form of writing (and if they do so in the first place), their stories are based on oral traditions. Let's say the depiction the Aborigine explained was first etched or painted 150 years ago. If you could hear his story and then go back in time to hear the story when it was first created, you can be assured that there would be numerous differences. As vibrant as oral traditions are, they cannot perfectly preserve stories because they are subject to the human brain (not to mention societal changes and adaptations which might change the meaning or thrust of specific details in a story).

With writing, however, ideas are fixed. They change or adapt only if deliberately altered by a later writer, which certainly happens. Rock art cannot represent a spoken language, its vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. It is merely mnemonic. However, scripts such as Egyptian hieroglyphs, Akkadian cuneiform, and Mycenaean Linear B represent three completely different languages. sounds unique to each of those languages, and specific grammatical structures such as case endings, verb tense, word order, and adverbial clauses. This is what actual writing entails.

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Judging by King Lear, I'd say you're butchering Shakespeare.

--Jaylemurph

No, I didn't read King Lear as an adult. I would not have memorized that line as a teen, the age when I did indeed read it.

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Posted (edited)

Cave paintings or rock art can definitely be a form of communication, but that's not the same as writing. Let's use your example of the depiction used by the Aborigine. As with all societies before they develop a form of writing (and if they do so in the first place), their stories are based on oral traditions. Let's say the depiction the Aborigine explained was first etched or painted 150 years ago. If you could hear his story and then go back in time to hear the story when it was first created, you can be assured that there would be numerous differences. As vibrant as oral traditions are, they cannot perfectly preserve stories because they are subject to the human brain (not to mention societal changes and adaptations which might change the meaning or thrust of specific details in a story).

With writing, however, ideas are fixed. They change or adapt only if deliberately altered by a later writer, which certainly happens. Rock art cannot represent a spoken language, its vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. It is merely mnemonic. However, scripts such as Egyptian hieroglyphs, Akkadian cuneiform, and Mycenaean Linear B represent three completely different languages. sounds unique to each of those languages, and specific grammatical structures such as case endings, verb tense, word order, and adverbial clauses. This is what actual writing entails.

Well, that certainly gives me some interesting thoughts.

Just letting you know, Ibrahim Karim, biogeometry specialist and trained in Egyptian mysteries, says that we are inaccurate to consider that Isis and Horus and Osiris were "gods". The error is that we have oversimplified their true meaning. He says that their depictions and names are mere representations of specific earth energies. He also included in that all the math in the hieroglyphs and the represenations of those "gods", that all those representations merely exuded the energies they represented. Boy, the thought was complex and he took a chapter to really describe it. Did i get it accurately to you as something to think about?

But you know, I think it is time that we allow the reading of ancient icons and acknowledge the effect of those ancient icons as being just as important as actual writings. The new human cannot stay one-sided in their brains. We MUST use both sides equally. And maybe that is why the internet, with all it's use of visual icons and photographs and so on, is taking us into some kind of more advanced mental balance. And maybe because we are headed that way, that there is so many drugs being pushed that prevent that balance.

I am just letting you know that I would LOVE to lay in that sandstone box while music and drums are playing around me. It is a fantasy.

Edited by regeneratia

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