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'How Does This Happen?'

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When Glenn Johnson got an early heads-up from management that General Motors Co. (GM) was recalling its Chevrolet Cobalt for an ignition-switch defect, his first reaction was unprintable.

Like many of his colleagues at the Lordstown Assembly Plant in Ohio, where the Cobalt was made, Johnson, 56, wondered how a flaw in a part had slipped through the cracks and led to the deaths of at least 13 people.

“How does this happen?” said Johnson, president of United Auto Workers Local 1112. “We ask the same questions and we’re put off like everyone else.”

The recall is a rare piece of bad news for a plant that in many ways has mirrored the revival of Detroit-based GM. Over the past four decades workers at the Lordstown factory have experienced layoffs, worries the factory would close and then renewal when they began building the Chevrolet Cruze, a hit replacement for the Cobalt. Now the recall of 2.59 million Cobalts and other small cars for the faulty ignition switch -- and revelations that GM took more than a decade to tell the world about it -- threatens to damage the Chevrolet brand and send drivers into the arms of rivals.

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Well guys: If you don't know how it happened I suggest you quit blaming the unions for the demise of your company.

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It just happens.

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Well, today I heard on the News that Toyota were recalling 5 million or something like that because the Steering wheel might collapse, or something like that. It's not necessarily further proof of the irrevocable decline of America.

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Well, today I heard on the News that Toyota were recalling 5 million or something like that because the Steering wheel might collapse, or something like that. It's not necessarily further proof of the irrevocable decline of America.

No, it is just the sign of the decline of works ethics in the West, especially there where the "American system" is excessively imitated.

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No way does this "just happen". There is a serious problem within the supply chain, and, I suspect; a Blind Eye turned towards Quality Control. How did this problem pass FAI (First Article Inspection) , how did defective parts pass Inspection?

People die as a result of these errors, and this is totally unnecessary.

It is about time that GM adopted TQM (Total Quality Management), to address ALL of the problems from Admin to assembly.

This really does not need to happen in this day and age....

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No, it is just the sign of the decline of works ethics in the West, especially there where the "American system" is excessively imitated.

But this was Toyota, who are Japanese and are paragons of efficiency.
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Posted (edited)

But this was Toyota, who are Japanese and are paragons of efficiency.

Not since they have implemented the "shareholder value" paradigm.

Edited by questionmark
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Posted (edited)

Well guys: If you don't know how it happened I suggest you quit blaming the unions for the demise of your company.

why? they are the ones that bring it down. this recal thing, is not in anyway an evidence that they do not.

Edited by aztek

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Not since they have implemented the "shareholder value" paradigm.

and toyota's quality, resale value is still way above GM,

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Posted (edited)

Not since they have implemented the "shareholder value" paradigm.

morganfreeman_zpsed7e7bfc.jpg

Personally, I am a Honda guy...have had a couple Honda cars and motorcycles...call them Rice burners if you want to, but they are and were the most dependable and reliable vehicles I have ever owned. We have a Toyota now, and it's ok...but Honda is the winner in my opinion.

Well western greed has pretty much permeated every place on this planet..."Who cares abut doing a good job, you still gonna get paid"...

and that's the way people think...sorry but it's the truth....

The last American made car I had was a 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix and before that was a 1995 Grand Prix. I liked Pontiacs...had a Firebird in the 80's and an old barge sized 1975 Grand Prix too...loved them...but guess what?...Pontiac is no more...go figure....

Edited by Jeremiah65
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have 5th honda, i see how their qualtiy drops year by year, my 06 accord was build better than 2013 accord, uneven gaps, ruttle in dashboard on hot days, lot of little shortcuts, like no glove box light, no tinted stripe on top of windshield, floor mat that developed a hole after only 10k. ..... it is pbly my last honda. i had 2011 sonata hybrid, it was way above in qualitry over honda. too bad it was totaled.

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Better selling in no way equates better made ~

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Posted (edited)

It's Government Motors now. I'm surprised all their vehicles aren't the Family Truckster.

Edited by Sweetpumper

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Better selling in no way equates better made ~

you right ford taurus was no1 selling car for years if not decades, and it was POS, big time.

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Posted (edited)

morganfreeman_zpsed7e7bfc.jpg

Personally, I am a Honda guy...have had a couple Honda cars and motorcycles...call them Rice burners if you want to, but they are and were the most dependable and reliable vehicles I have ever owned. We have a Toyota now, and it's ok...but Honda is the winner in my opinion.

Well western greed has pretty much permeated every place on this planet..."Who cares abut doing a good job, you still gonna get paid"...

and that's the way people think...sorry but it's the truth....

The last American made car I had was a 2004 Pontiac Grand Prix and before that was a 1995 Grand Prix. I liked Pontiacs...had a Firebird in the 80's and an old barge sized 1975 Grand Prix too...loved them...but guess what?...Pontiac is no more...go figure....

Yeah and here's another thing to consider- cheaply made parts! What I'm talking about is the materials they make these parts out of. Mostly plastic being the worse.

I worked as a mechanic for a number of dealerships, mainly GM, over the years and one thing I noticed as time went on, the friggin' parts got made with crappy ass cheap material. Seem like it started happening some time after the 80's, with GM parts being the worse and you'd payed for what you got too. Cheap price, cheap made. I mean the parts would just break in a short amount time, alternators being the worse IMO.

Meanwhile, the foreign cars were being made with well made materials, expensive though, but well made. That's why those Hondas and Toyotos lasted longer, or use to; seems like they're going the same route now as GM, Ford, Chrysler/Dodge with cheaply made products.

It's ridiculous! One of these days they're gonna make parts so cheap, that will fall apart or crap out on somebody while driving and get that somebody killed!

*looks at Questionmark's first post*

Oooooh right! Too late!

EDIT: Typos

Edited by Purifier

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cheaper parts made with cheaper materials just means bigger bonuses for the Suits and Ties ~ not 'cheaper cars' exactly ~

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Posted (edited)

but truth to be told, it was not so much quality issue with cobalt. a smal part in ignition lock was a bit smaller than it had to, spring was shorter, so not enough tension to hold lock in position, and heavy keychain did not help. it was design flaw not quality issue. while the new part was less than a dollar, to get a car fixed would be hundred times more, and i'm sure dealers rate of no less than $70 an hour contributed to high replacment cost.

Edited by aztek

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cheaper parts made with cheaper materials just means bigger bonuses for the Suits and Ties ~ not 'cheaper cars' exactly ~

Yeah I know. Greed hurting the rest of us. Another thought to consider. ;)

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I'd agree with the people saying "don't blame GM/Detroit".

Modern cars are very complex, and mistakes will occasionally happen. Lets not forget that even Supercars, built by very experienced companies, can go wrong. The £170,000 Ferrari 458 had to be recalled because the glue on the rear wheel housing could catch fire, ultimately destroying the car. Recently, a Danish production supercar caught fire while being tested on Top Gear, and was destroyed. (cooling system failed, resulting in rear breaks bursting into flames).

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I'd agree with the people saying "don't blame GM/Detroit".

Modern cars are very complex, and mistakes will occasionally happen. Lets not forget that even Supercars, built by very experienced companies, can go wrong. The £170,000 Ferrari 458 had to be recalled because the glue on the rear wheel housing could catch fire, ultimately destroying the car. Recently, a Danish production supercar caught fire while being tested on Top Gear, and was destroyed. (cooling system failed, resulting in rear breaks bursting into flames).

That doesn't change the fact that GM sucks.

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No way does this "just happen". There is a serious problem within the supply chain, and, I suspect; a Blind Eye turned towards Quality Control. How did this problem pass FAI (First Article Inspection) , how did defective parts pass Inspection?

People die as a result of these errors, and this is totally unnecessary.

It is about time that GM adopted TQM (Total Quality Management), to address ALL of the problems from Admin to assembly.

This really does not need to happen in this day and age....

TQM? since they are a auto manufacturer they probably have been through TQM, ISO 9000, QS 9000, TPM, Natural work teams, Kaizen, and they all got their black belts in Six Sigma. it doesn't matter since most of those systems last only as long as the company puts an effort into enforcing them which ends when orders pick up and they don't have time or they buy into another system. plus most of the quality systems done at plants end up being

pencil whipped in the pursuit of efficiency as long as the part was checked good on paper it was good. right? it would take a outside agency back checking the manufactures to insure total quality but to pay for such an agency would make all automobiles a luxury item. but if GM ends up paying restitution in the millions the industry might want to figure out how to make it work.

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why? they are the ones that bring it down. this recal thing, is not in anyway an evidence that they do not.

How the b******s are unions responsible for p*** poor quality control?

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But this was Toyota, who are Japanese and are paragons of efficiency.

Did it take Toyota a decade to invoke the recall. Toyota has performed a number of recalls recently which have damaged their reputation but didn't take a decade of prevarication before they prioritized safety over profits.

It is indeed true that every company can make a mistake - but its how they deal with those mistakes which is important. GM failed because they put profits above life in this and other cases.

Br Cornelius

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How the b******s are unions responsible for p*** poor quality control?

the copmpany nearly folded some time ago, due to union costs, union promotes lazynes, and irresponcibuility, you do not get punished, in most cases, hell unions fought and made company rehire people that were fired for smoking weed on the job. i wonder how having stoned workers affects quality, lol

but this particular case, union really has little to do, may be higher labour cost can be contributed to company unwilling to perform recall, but it was design flaw in this case.

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Posted (edited)

I'd agree with the people saying "don't blame GM/Detroit".

Modern cars are very complex, and mistakes will occasionally happen. Lets not forget that even Supercars, built by very experienced companies, can go wrong. The £170,000 Ferrari 458 had to be recalled because the glue on the rear wheel housing could catch fire, ultimately destroying the car. Recently, a Danish production supercar caught fire while being tested on Top Gear, and was destroyed. (cooling system failed, resulting in rear breaks bursting into flames).

we talking about 15k pos compact car, that has most parts carryover from previous models, not 170k sport car.

Edited by aztek

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