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Still Waters

Bill to end killer whale shows at SeaWorld

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A California bill that sought to end killer whale shows at SeaWorld in San Diego and phase out their captivity was put on hold Tuesday, dousing an escalating fight between animal activists and supporters of the major tourist attraction.

http://www.theguardi...er-whales-shows

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I think the activists don't understand (or take into consideration) that the knowlege gained by the keepers of the captive animals is of immense value to the wild ones that may need to be rescued and rehabilitated. Watch some of those animal rescue show and see how great the efforts of the people at sea world are to do right by the species as a whole as well as the individuals.

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Posted (edited)

It wouldn't break my heart if they didn't have the killer whale or dolphins shows anymore. These animals are too big to be in a relatively small aquarium, compared to their native habitat.

But what else is there to do at Sea World anyway?

Edited by little_dreamer

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I think the activists don't understand (or take into consideration) that the knowlege gained by the keepers of the captive animals is of immense value to the wild ones that may need to be rescued and rehabilitated. Watch some of those animal rescue show and see how great the efforts of the people at sea world are to do right by the species as a whole as well as the individuals.

Mind you, jumping through hoops etc isn't exactly a natural thing for animals to do.

There's a difference between rehabilitation and the like and exhibition.

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I think the activists don't understand (or take into consideration) that the knowlege gained by the keepers of the captive animals is of immense value to the wild ones that may need to be rescued and rehabilitated. Watch some of those animal rescue show and see how great the efforts of the people at sea world are to do right by the species as a whole as well as the individuals.

There are people who dedicate their lives to gaining "knowledge" by studying these beautiful creatures in their natural habitat. I dont see how much of knowledge we would gain by capturing orcas, putting them in swimming pools, and making money out of their misery.

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I would have less problem with the confinement of the animals for education purposes and as an ambassador for marine life which few get to see in the wild IF they could be giving adequate habitat in captivity. Therein lies the problem; some animals lead a very sedentary lifestyle; it's hard to feel too bad for a captive python in a large cage, they basically live to eat, sleep off their meal and then eat again and they don't often interact with their own species. But an animal like an orca, how do you provide a suitable habitat for a creature that roams hundreds or thousands of miles in an extremely complex and varied environment and lives in large family groups? Even if you take an animal like a big cat, they often have huge home ranges, and while zoos have certainly improved, most cannot afford to have a 20 acre (and that is tiny) exhibit for a group of cheetah or a pair of tigers, much less an aquatic facility requiring millions of gallons, with all the associated costs of maintaining clear, clean and chilled sea water.

And it becomes problematic to house any animal of relatively high intelligence: Apes and monkeys get bored, so do polar bears, and these animals require constant intellectual stimulation which may consist of new toys, hiding food so they can find it, basically anything to prevent boredom. I am no animal psychologist but I have to wonder if some of the attacks on trainers and other humans by captive orca is partly the result of boredom and frustration. I don't think they are malevolent, but after all they are not called "killer whales" for no reason.

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I was lucky enough to see orca's in the wild while in Iceland at the end of February, amazing beautiful creatures. I can understand why people want to see them, but seeing them in their natural environment was just outstanding. Seeing an orca jump through a hoop and swim around the same pool of water (however large) just does not sit right with me.

There was one of the study teams out in a boat the day we saw the orca's in Iceland. Much can be learned from studying them in their natural environment with minimal contact.

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Posted (edited)

I think the activists don't understand (or take into consideration) that the knowlege gained by the keepers of the captive animals is of immense value to the wild ones that may need to be rescued and rehabilitated.

I`m sorry but your logic is similar to, but just as perverted as, the logic of the Japanese whalers claiming to do whaling for research purposes. We do not have the ****ing right to jail Orcas/Dolphins just for entertainment purposes. These are wildlife animals, travelling thousands of miles through the oceans each year and taking/keeping them into a very limited living space is jailing. When placed there,they are degenerated from their natural life and limited to nearly zero options to swim, to dive, to hunt, to select partners and to establish social circles on a free will as in the wildlife. This must be the real fun for Orcas, don`t you think so?

And these animals do not need our research to survive. They did that very well already for millions of years long b4 humans popped into the scene and all they need is a clean environment. If they are in trouble, it`s a human originated cause. And that is the spot where scientific research have to be started first. Ok, for this research it would be required to keep some animals in captivity for a period of time, but this reseach does not require that these animals are captured for their whole life and to do little funny games with colored rings and balls in front of a noisy audience of hundreds of bawling people. Apropos life: the average span of life of Orcas in the wildlife is 30y/male and 50y/female, with a maximum of 60y/90y. In captivity the span of life is <10y with an average of 4y. And a dirty question in relation to this fact must be asked, did the Orcas died a natural death or were these animals "depolluted" as their behavior to the trainers switched from a pet to a potential killer as a result of the captivity? 1+1=2, isn`t it?

These Orca/Dolphin parks may show the beauty of nature but they also kill this beauty as it is a part of the business.

Watch some of those animal rescue show and see how great the efforts of the people at sea world are to do right by the species as a whole as well as the individuals.

You got catched for about 100% by the XXXXXXX marketing. As you think they are doing some kind of scientific research, pls check the financial report for Q1/2013, there is not one single figure and so not one single cent spend on scientific research.

http://seaworld.q4we...ts/default.aspx

Edited by toast
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I was lucky enough to see orca's in the wild while in Iceland at the end of February, amazing beautiful creatures. I can understand why people want to see them, but seeing them in their natural environment was just outstanding. Seeing an orca jump through a hoop and swim around the same pool of water (however large) just does not sit right with me.

There was one of the study teams out in a boat the day we saw the orca's in Iceland. Much can be learned from studying them in their natural environment with minimal contact.

the ones in the wild tend to be more aggressive in natural habitation

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IMO the only valid reason to 'pen up' an orca, etc would be to nurse them back to health, then to release them back to the wild... I'm certain the 'performing Orca's' was a major money maker for Seaworld

and helped defray the costs of their other exhibits... They are after all little more than an aquatic zoo... But please, let's not pretend it was "for science"...

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FREE WILLY !!!

I believe this bill should be called the 'Free Willy Bill'

:yes:

~

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the ones in the wild tend to be more aggressive in natural habitation

Yes, maybe. But aggressive against humans, so what. The oceans are their territory and they are living there, we don`t.

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Yes, maybe. But aggressive against humans, so what. The oceans are their territory and they are living there, we don`t.

Exactly, that is why we kept our distance. It's their home, we were just visiting.

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I want to see this Blackfish movie.

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