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Waspie_Dwarf

[merged] Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator

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Reporters See NASA's Latest High Tech Exploration Tool Before Testing

On April 9 reporters got a chance to don "bunny suits" (protective apparel that sometimes makes people look like large rabbits) and enter a NASA clean room at the agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. In the room is NASA's latest technology for landing large payloads on planets like Mars or Earth, being processed for shipping prior to testing next June.

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project will be flying a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle into near-space this June from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility on Kauai, Hawaii.

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LDSD: We Brake for Mars

NASA tests a supersonic parachute under Mars-like conditions for future exploration.

Credit: NASA/JPL

Source: NASA/JPL - Videos

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NASA's Saucer-Shaped Craft Preps for Flight Test

NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle, has completed final assembly at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii.

This experimental flight test is designed to investigate breakthrough technologies that will benefit future Mars missions, including those involving human exploration. Three weeks of testing, simulations and rehearsals are planned before the first launch opportunity on the morning of June 3. LDSD was built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, and shipped to Kauai for final assembly and preparations.

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NASA preps real flying saucer for take-off

To test new tech for future Mars missions, NASA builds an experimental rocket-powered flight vehicle that looks like it could be a UFO.

The classic UFO is a flying saucer, an alien spacecraft that looks impossible, like it must be the product of advanced technology from a distant civilization. The whole UFO phenomenon is about to get much more down-to-Earth with NASA's new test vehicle, a crazy-looking experiment scheduled for a test flight in early June.

http://www.cnet.com/uk/news/nasa-preps-flying-saucer-for-take-off/

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Take me to your mission control leader.

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Before the Drop: Engineers Ready Supersonic Decelerator

A saucer-shaped vehicle designed to test interplanetary landing devices hangs on a tower in preparation for launch at the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii. The saucer, which is part of NASA's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project, will test two devices for landing heavy payloads on Mars: an inflatable tube and an enormous parachute.

The launch tower helps link the vehicle to a balloon; once the balloon floats up, the vehicle is released from the tower and the balloon carries it to high altitudes. The vehicle's rocket takes it to even higher altitudes, to the top of the stratosphere, where the supersonic test begins.

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LDSD: We Brake for Mars: Part 2

In part 2, JPL engineer Mike Meacham explains how an inflatable decelerator will help large spacecraft land on Mars.

Credit: NASA/JPL

Source: NASA/JPL - Videos

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nasa finally lands man on another planet....

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So after all the denials of any type of flying saucers reported, NASA actually uses the fictional shape ?

Doesn't make sense, unless of course there is actually some truth in these false reports.

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LDSD Testing for Large Payloads to Mars

What will it take to land heavier spacecraft on Mars? How will engineers slow large payloads traveling at supersonic speeds in a thin Martian atmosphere? Can this be done?

NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility is playing an integral role in potentially answering those questions with the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator mission, or LDSD.

To conduct advanced exploration missions in the future and safely land heavier spacecraft on Mars, NASA must advance the technology of decelerating large payloads traveling at supersonic speeds in thin atmospheres to a new level of performance. The current technology for decelerating payloads dates back to NASA’s Viking Program, which placed two landers on Mars in 1976. That same technology is still being used and most recently delivered the Curiosity rover to Mars in 2012.

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If they're making one, then it would be identified instead of unidentified, yes? So I suppose we should call it an IFO. Or just an FO. At any rate I'd rather fly. Or at least ride on an airplane.

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If they're making one, then it would be identified instead of unidentified, yes? So I suppose we should call it an IFO. Or just an FO. At any rate I'd rather fly. Or at least ride on an airplane.

:blink:

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Posted (edited)

:blink:

You seem puzzled.

SaraT's post was, I believe, in response to Zeta Reticulum's post from the 25th, which itself is a rather silly response to the article seeder posted.

This mission has NOTHING to do with flying saucers. That the vehicle is vaguely saucer shaped is simply a result of testing a circular heat shield. With the exception of the shuttle just about every heat shield on every mission every flown has been circular.

If aliens really are visiting us in saucer shaped craft I think it is highly unlikely that they are saucer shaped because the aliens are slowing their ships with inflatable tubes and gigantic parachutes. I find it equally unlikely that the alien flying saucers require helium balloons to get them to high altitude either.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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Onward to Mars via Hawaii

NASA to Test Breakthrough Lander Technologies

Stepping stone technologies useful for landing large payloads on Mars – including habitats and other equipment to support future explorers of the Red Planet – will soon take to the skies…right here from our home planet Earth.

NASA’s Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) technology demonstration project is set for its premier test at the U.S. Navy’s Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF) on Kauai, Hawaii.

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You seem puzzled.

SaraT's post was, I believe, in response to Zeta Reticulum's post from the 25th, which itself is a rather silly response to

the article seeder posted.

Ok, now it makes more sense to me.

This mission has NOTHING to do with flying saucers.

I`m confident that you know that I know that.

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I`m confident that you know that I know that.

Your confidence is well founded.

Zeta Reticulum is a sea-gull poster, he rarely returns to the scene after leaving a comment, but this was just in case he breaks that habit.

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If they're making one, then it would be identified instead of unidentified, yes? So I suppose we should call it an IFO. Or just an FO. At any rate I'd rather fly. Or at least ride on an airplane.

LOL. Only you. And I notice you've come over to the Dark (Canadian) Side by spelling it airplane instead of aeroplane.

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Monday, June 2, 2nd Update

June 2, 2014 - 5:30 PM EDT

Due to weather conditions, there will be no launch of the LDSD test vehicle tomorrow. Other potential launch dates include June 5, 7, 9, 11, and 14. Launch decision for Thursday, June 5 will be made on Wednesday, June 4. Check back with us for updates.

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LDSD: The Great Shakeout Test For Mars

NASA readies for the experimental flight of a test vehicle designed for landing larger payloads on Mars.

Credit: NASA/JPL

Source: NASA/JPL - Videos

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Wednesday, June 4 Update

June 4, 2014 - 5:27 PM EDT

Due to weather conditions, there will be no launch of the LDSD test vehicle tomorrow, Thursday, June 5. Other potential launch dates include June 7, 9, 11, and 14. Launch decision for Saturday, June 7 will be made on Friday, June 6.

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News Briefing Previews Test of Saucer Shaped Vehicle

NASA held a news conference from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kauai, Hawaii on June 2 about the upcoming test of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) project. During the test, a rocket-powered, saucer-shaped test vehicle will be flown into near-space. LDSD could lead to inflatable spacecraft systems capable of safely landing heavier and larger payloads than ever before on planets with atmospheres. June 3 is the first of six potential launch dates. NASA will issue launch advisories via the mission website, media advisories and on Twitter at: https://twitter.com/NASA_Technology'>https://twitter.com/NASA_Technology and https://twitter.com/NASA

Credit: NASA

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Sunday, June 8 Update

June 8, 2014 - 8:12 PM EDT

The winds aren't cooperating for our launch of the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) tomorrow, Monday, June 9. Other potential launch dates include June 11 and 14. Wind conditions have been the prevailing factor in the launch delays ­ they have to be just the right speed and direction in order to launch the balloon that carries the LDSD test vehicle. The launch decision for Wednesday, June 11 will be made on Tuesday, June 10.

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Wednesday, June 11 Update

June 11, 2014 - 6:40 AM EDT

Due to weather conditions, there will be no launch of the LDSD test vehicle on Wednesday, June 11. The next potential launch date is Saturday, June 14.

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Wednesday, June 11 2nd Update

June 11, 2014 - 5:43 PM EDT

NASA's Low Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) will not launch Saturday, June 14, due to unfavorable weather conditions forecast for this last designated launch date in the current launch period. NASA will research range availability for the coming weeks and the costs associated with extending the test flight period for launching LDSD's high-altitude balloon and test vehicle, with programmatic decisions required to proceed.

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LDSD Launch Status Updates

Thursday, June 12 Update

June 12, 2014 - 2:55 PM EDT

NASA did not conduct the flight test of the agency's Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator (LDSD) from the U.S. Navy's Pacific Missile Range in Kauai, Hawaii, during its designated launch period. The project's reserved range time at the range will expire Saturday, June 14, with NASA unable to fly the test because of continuing unfavorable weather conditions.

Mark Adler, the Low Density Supersonic Decelerator project manager and Ian Clark, principal investigator on the project, both from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, participated in a media teleconference this morning and addressed questions on the project.

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