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Waspie_Dwarf

SpaceX: F9R First Flight Test

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F9R First Flight Test | 250m

Video of Falcon 9 Resuable (F9R) taking its first test flight at our rocket development facility. F9R lifts off from a launch mount to a height of approximately 250m, hovers and then returns for landing just next to the launch stand. Early flights of F9R will take off with legs fixed in the down position. However, we will soon be transitioning to liftoff with legs stowed against the side of the rocket and then extending them just before landing.

The F9R testing program is the next step towards reusability following completion of the Grasshopper program last year (Grasshopper can be seen in the background of this video). Future testing, including that in New Mexico, will be conducted using the first stage of a F9R as shown here, which is essentially a Falcon 9 v1.1 first stage with legs. F9R test flights in New Mexico will allow us to test at higher altitudes than we are permitted for at our test site in Texas, to do more with unpowered guidance and to prove out landing cases that are more-flight like.

Source: spacexchannel - YouTube

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Neat. When you think about it though the legs are a bit flashy i wonder if theyre absolutely neccessary.

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Posted (edited)

Neat. When you think about it though the legs are a bit flashy i wonder if theyre absolutely neccessary.

I find the words "think about," in a post like that particularly ironic.

Very tall things without a wide base will tend to fall over.

A rocket without legs is a very tall thing without a wide base.

A rocket WITH legs is a very tall thing WITH a wide base.

Before lift-off a rocket is held in place on the launch pad using either clamps or explosive bolts and is released only when the engines have reached sufficient thrust that the rocket will launch without falling over.

A rocket designed to land back on the ground after launch will not have the luxury of clamps or explosive bolts when it lands, therefore it will need something to support it.

Since a rocket needs to be as aerodynamic as possible in the early stages of flight what ever it uses to support it at landing needs to be something that can fold away during flight and then be deployed before it lands. Legs are the best solution.

So yes they ARE necessary.

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf
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True i was just wondering if lugs might be more effective, you know like stabiliser fins one third up the height of the rocket, and then it could be lowered into a launch hole or silo on return... The landing wouldnt be so 'hot' then.

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True i was just wondering if lugs might be more effective, you know like stabiliser fins one third up the height of the rocket, and then it could be lowered into a launch hole or silo on return... The landing wouldnt be so 'hot' then.

Please tell me you aren't serious.

Landing a vehicle of this size is difficult enough, which is why it has never been attempted before. You seriously want to reverse a huge rocket down a hole?

How is it going to be any less hot?

Does reversing a rocket down a hole magically mean that you no longer need engines. Or maybe a hole magically makes the rocket exhaust fumes cooler. Or maybe you don't know what you are talking about so you are just making stuff up as you go along.

Me, I'm going with the last of those three options.

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Please tell me you aren't serious.

Landing a vehicle of this size is difficult enough, which is why it has never been attempted before. You seriously want to reverse a huge rocket down a hole?

You seriously doubt technology? Look at the size of a spaceship docking port.

How is it going to be any less hot?

Does reversing a rocket down a hole magically mean that you no longer need engines. Or maybe a hole magically makes the rocket exhaust fumes cooler. Or maybe you don't know what you are talking about so you are just making stuff up as you go along.

Me, I'm going with the last of those three options.

The trick is to have a suspended hole or silo so the rocket comes to rest a hundred or so feet above the earth where it can be shut down then lowered. No fatigue on legs because the legs are engineered to be land based. If anything will be faulty in the F9R im picking landing gear.

This idea is just design tweaking really but if you want to check out outlandish ideas feel free to laugh at these...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-rocket_spacelaunch

Personally I like the idea of laser propelled or aircraft assisted launches...maybe the extreme cannons would be more suited to payloads or sattelites.

http://www.dailykos.com/story/2010/06/05/873102/-Beyond-The-Space-Elevator-A-Glimpse-Of-Alternative-Methods-For-Space-Launch#

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And what do the two links you have provided have to do with your, quite frankly, moronic idea?

Yet again you post total rubbish and then provide irrelevant links,

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