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Still Waters

'Unteachable' pupils refused teaching

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The NASUWT and the National Union of Teachers have "refused to teach" children on eight occasions in the last year amid concerns over indiscipline and malicious allegations.

http://www.telegraph...in-lessons.html

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If some kid grabbed me by the throat they'd cop a gut punch from me and if they vandalized my car a note from my silk would be delievered to their parents.

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Most teachers strikes I think are unnecessary but this one I will back 100%. I have taught post 16 year old's and know what it is like when you get abusive, disruptive pupils in the class. It can totally destroy the education for others. It is totally unfair on the ones who really want an education.

There is nothing more deflating when you try to exclude them for the sake of the others only to be told you have to have them back. I have been verbally abused and even close to being assaulted. Half the time the decision to keep them is purely financial as they don't want to lose the money allocated for the student.

There use to be specialist schools for children who could not handle mainstream schools. No doubt they have probably been done away with.

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Most teachers strikes I think are unnecessary but this one I will back 100%. I have taught post 16 year old's and know what it is like when you get abusive, disruptive pupils in the class. It can totally destroy the education for others. It is totally unfair on the ones who really want an education.

There is nothing more deflating when you try to exclude them for the sake of the others only to be told you have to have them back. I have been verbally abused and even close to being assaulted. Half the time the decision to keep them is purely financial as they don't want to lose the money allocated for the student.

There use to be specialist schools for children who could not handle mainstream schools. No doubt they have probably been done away with.

Fully agree with this.

There has to be something teachers can fall back on when they have pupils who are over the line.

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This is why I don't agree with mandatory schooling per se. If they don't want to go to school, so be it, save us the tax dollars. The alternative will be a lifetime of productivity in the coal mines (or mining asteroids if we get to that point).

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Fully agree with this.

There has to be something teachers can fall back on when they have pupils who are over the line.

Here in Oz, we have (or had, knowing our government and their love of cutting services) what amounts to "hard as nails schools", it's where the "I don't want to be here, you're a d********" students go to learn how to be mechanics or whatever, basically they go one-on-one with a teacher who sits them down and says "what do you want to do and follow me as I get you there" with no sugar coating, no "mass education" or "one size fits all" approach to the point of the teacher being able to abuse back if they cop a serve from the student (if they think that approach would work to endear them to the student that is, it's very psychological).

It works, sometimes it takes three or four goes for it to work (ie they leave the school, or go to gaol or whatever), but it works.

If they want to be a mechanic, the teacher spells out explicitly what they need to do and what they need to know and then creates/adapts an learning plan to reach that goal and so on and so forth.

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Posted (edited)

Here in the UK we have school's Inclusion Officers whose job it is to not only to ensure a duty of care to Special Needs students but also to students whom teaching staff have difficulty teaching because of serious behavioural issues. Some kids cause disruption to classes and make it impossible for the teacher to deliver an uninterrupted lesson which then leaves the school open to complaints from parent's whose children are failing to thrive in certain lessons ...I know, I have been that complaining parent! Invariably nothing is done as the child in question needs to be included in the class ....regardless of the disruption.

Once the children move to secondary school (high school) the exclusion unit is often used as a punishment and if that doesn't have the desired effect, a referral unit can be used in conjunction with the local police force and social services (in my area anyway).

Teachers are not paid enough to take the abuse that they do from (some) unteachable students and I'm saying that with my foster carer hat on.

edit - I meant to add that both my son and foster son were in the same class at school ...and that is were I found my difficulty.

Edited by amaterasu

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