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The war on antibiotic resistance has begun

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Leading healthcare experts have proposed new measures to tackle the threat of resistant bacteria.

The idea of a future in which even the most common infections can kill you might sound like something from the pages of a science fiction novel, yet within a few decades we could all be facing a reality very much like this.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/266699/the-war-on-antibiotic-resistance-has-begun

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Heh, one way of tackling the spread of antibiotic-resistant bugs would be to encourage doctors to wash their hands before examining each patient.

And requiring all people visiting hospitals to use antiseptic handwash when they enter. I do it every time I go to a hospital, and make sure my children do the same.

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Posted (edited)

Heh, one way of tackling the spread of antibiotic-resistant bugs would be to encourage doctors to wash their hands before examining each patient.

And requiring all people visiting hospitals to use antiseptic handwash when they enter. I do it every time I go to a hospital, and make sure my children do the same.

The issue here is not trying to limit the spread of infectious diseases, but having anti-biotics which work when people do become infected. People will become infected - there is no stopping that. You can limit and try to prevent this, but it will still happen, especially with infections which are air-borne. The problem here is stopping these infections, which until recently could be treated with anti-biotics, from turning into a huge problem which could literally cause more deaths than World War II.

I'm surprised this problem, which is completely real and already affecting us, has not been given the importance it deserves, especially since we've known about this issue since the 1970s and 80s.

Edited by Exorcist
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Interest in natural anti's will probably gain some ground.

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The overuse of antibiotics, both in medical practice and animal husbandry has given disease organisms a great many opportunities to adapt to them. This has caused a vicious circle. More and more antibiotic use, and in greater and greater variety, to try to combat increasing acquired resistance in bacteria. More conservative use of antibiotics would help, though this would not be in line with the profit motive of drug companies.

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The overuse of antibiotics, both in medical practice and animal husbandry has given disease organisms a great many opportunities to adapt to them. This has caused a vicious circle. More and more antibiotic use, and in greater and greater variety, to try to combat increasing acquired resistance in bacteria. More conservative use of antibiotics would help, though this would not be in line with the profit motive of drug companies.

You've nailed it buddy. I think they're going about this the wrong way and should be purposefully and gradually exposing us so these so as to build our natural defences. Our over-reliance on antibiotics for minor ailments is ridiculous (compared to earlier generations) and more or less akin to a nanny state where we'll never build defences once exposed to unexpected hostile conditions. Of course the multi-billion dollar pharmaceutical industry are not going to like it.

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The issue here is not trying to limit the spread of infectious diseases, but having anti-biotics which work when people do become infected. People will become infected - there is no stopping that. You can limit and try to prevent this, but it will still happen, especially with infections which are air-borne. The problem here is stopping these infections, which until recently could be treated with anti-biotics, from turning into a huge problem which could literally cause more deaths than World War II.

I take your point, but I think my point is still valid: if we can reduce the number of infections through improved hygiene we can decrease the use of antibiotics and thus reduce the opportunities for bacteria to evolve resistance.

I have to say I have a personal interest in the matter. Firstly, my brother-in-law became infected following surgery thanks to a careless doctor not washing his hands prior to examining the incision. Secondly, I'm likely to undergo surgery in the next few months, and with a young family to support the last thing I need is to have my recovery time increased by infection.

I'm surprised this problem, which is completely real and already affecting us, has not been given the importance it deserves, especially since we've known about this issue since the 1970s and 80s.

Scarily, I understand the problem was first recognsed back in the 1940s, at least at a theoretical level. In any case, the problem is simply one of money - antibiotics are becoming harder to find and develop which are both effective against bacteria and not harmful to humans. (Several years ago I experienced septicaemia - gut bacteria got into my bloodstream - and one of the antibiotics I was given was toxic enough to humans that I had to have a blood test after every antibiotic dose.)

Personally, while I think governments subsidising research is a good start, I suspect there are other areas which could usefully be explored as well, such as bacteriophages.

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Anything leading off with "The War On ......." Is doomed to failure.

Sorry!

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Until they do something about the absurd overuse of antibiotics in animal production, new super-resistant bugs will keep popping up about as fast as new antibiotics are created. By far the majority of antibiotics used in the world today are not for human use, but to keep animals alive in super-intensive (and super-unhealthy) production units, which provide ideal grounds for the super-resistant strains to pop-up. From their to humans is always just a very small step.

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Licorice root, folks.

AND you must know how to boost your immune system by:

1. NOT drinking the tap water or filter out the fluoride somehow.

2. fermenting your own food

3. optional but good for you too, ...eating Kefir.

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Until they do something about the absurd overuse of antibiotics in animal production, new super-resistant bugs will keep popping up about as fast as new antibiotics are created. By far the majority of antibiotics used in the world today are not for human use, but to keep animals alive in super-intensive (and super-unhealthy) production units, which provide ideal grounds for the super-resistant strains to pop-up. From their to humans is always just a very small step.

There is medical article after medical article about new antibiotics that aim at the superbugs from angles that the superbug has not begun to fight. However, that drug would have to be 20 years on the market before I would use it.

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Licorice root, folks.

AND you must know how to boost your immune system by:

1. NOT drinking the tap water or filter out the fluoride somehow.

Absolute nonsense.

2. fermenting your own food

Has absolutely no impact. In fact, I would say the opposite.

3. optional but good for you too, ...eating Kefir.

Kefir is always good.

Cheers,

Badeskov

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Posted (edited)

Absolute nonsense.

Has absolutely no impact. In fact, I would say the opposite.

Kefir is always good.

Cheers,

Badeskov

Well, what you really mean is that YOU THINK it is absolute nonsense. but for most of us in the KNOW, it really is not.

Kefir is fermented, dear.

I

Not nonsense:

These results, published in the journal Cell on 9 January 2014, also clarify the role of the intestine and its associated microorganisms in maintaining glycaemia. They will give rise to new dietary recommendations to prevent diabetes and obesity.

Most sweet fruit and many vegetables such as salsify, cabbage or beans are rich in so-called fermentable fibers. Such fibers cannot be digested directly by the intestine but are instead fermented by intestinal bacteria into short-chain fatty acids such as propionate and butyrate, which can in fact be assimilated by our bodies. The protective effect of these fibers is well known to researchers:... http://www.eurekaler...d-hfp011514.php

http://www.eurekaler...d-hfp011514.php

Not nonsense:

Microbial breakthrough impacts health, agriculture, biofuels

... bacteria and human intestinal bacteria use to capture energy from dietary fiber. "By fermenting the fiber in our diets, the microbes in our large intestine help to provide about 10 ...

http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2010-09/uoic-mbi090710.php

Even medical sites are stating that we need to eat more fermented foods to boost our immune system. I did continuing education on it.

Yes, we have superbugs. But we do have ways to fight back.

Licorice (warning, it depletes serum potassium)

http://search.eurekalert.org/e3/query.html?col=ev3new&col=ev3oneyr&col=ev3rel&qt=licorice&charset=iso-8859-1

Edited by regeneratia

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Anything leading off with "The War On ......." Is doomed to failure. Sorry!

Ha!

+_43eae8abcce0b2655896d538f0e20015.jpg

The multi resistant bacteria are a huge problem now. Multi resistant TB looks to become one of the big killers.

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According to my continuing education, most of the over-use of antibiotics are blamed on emergency rooms.

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