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Still Waters

“Angel of Mons” “may have been UFO”

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An 'Angel' which many British soldiers credited with saving their lives in one of the first, brutal battles of World War I may not have been sent from heaven after all - but from the stars.

UFO authors suspect that the famous 'Angel of Mons' - described as either St George, St Michael, angels, or crowds of angelic warriors, may in fact have been extraterrestrial.

https://uk.news.yaho...09.html#xsxWOhg

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Among UFO enthusiasts, many believe that UFOs and angels are the same thing - or that sightings of angels have been of extraterrestrials, or even vice versa. A quick trawl of the web finds dozens of sites devotes to the topic.

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/%E2%80%9Cangel%E2%80%9D-which-saved-british-troops-in-ww1-%E2%80%9Cmay-have-been-ufo%E2%80%9D-131035809.html#QvrgKgA

At that time I thought the religious people did not believe in aliens too. Many religious people do not believe now, so why should she think it could be extraterrestrial? If believing in an angel was their way of coping through such hard times, then why try and change it? Its just not the same, they would not have believed in an alien from outer space to help them through. They chose an angel, why not leave it that way?!

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Why must EVERYTHING unexplained be "aliens"?

Why couldn't it be an Angel? HMMM?? There's as much evidence for them as there is people from the Pleiades visiting us for tea and tiffin.

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I read the link and never heard of this story. It tells that the British saw angelic beings but is there any testimony from the German side?

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Or perhaps they were literary licence taken by a news reporter which 'caught on' and became a legend?

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On 29 September 1914 Welsh author Arthur Machen published a short story entitled "The Bowmen" in the London newspaper The Evening News, inspired by accounts that he had read of the fighting at Mons and an idea he had had soon after the battle.

Machen, who had already written a number of factual articles on the conflict for the paper, set his story at the time of the retreat from the Battle of Mons in August 1914. The story described phantom bowmen from the Battle of Agincourt summoned by a soldier calling on St. George, destroying a German host.[1] Machen's story was not, however, labelled as fiction and the same edition of the Evening News ran a story by a different author under the heading "Our Short Story". Additionally, Machen's story was written from a first-hand perspective and was a kind of false document, a technique Machen knew well. The unintended result was that Machen had a number of requests to provide evidence for his sources for the story soon after its publication, from readers who thought it was true, to which he responded that it was completely imaginary, as he had no desire to create a hoax.

A month or two later Machen received requests from the editors of parish magazines to reprint the story, which were granted.[1] In the introduction to The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War (1915) Machen relates that an, unnamed, priest, the editor of one of these magazines, subsequently wrote to him asking if he would allow the story to be reprinted in pamphlet form, and if he would write a short preface giving sources for the story. Machen replied that they were welcome to reprint but he could not give any sources for the story since he had none. The priest replied that Machen must be mistaken, that the "facts" of the story must be true, and that Machen had just elaborated on a true account. As Machen later said:

It seemed that my light fiction had been accepted by the congregation of this particular church as the solidest of facts; and it was then that it began to dawn on me that if I had failed in the art of letters, I had succeeded, unwittingly, in the art of deceit. This happened, I should think, some time in April, and the snowball of rumour that was then set rolling has been rolling ever since, growing bigger and bigger, till it is now swollen to a monstrous size.

—Arthur Machen, Introduction to The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_of_Mons

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I think this shows how poverty stricken ufology is when they are dredging up incidents that never happened and attributing it to ufos.I have read extensively on WW1 and have only come across the Angel of Mons in reference to the myth that grew up around the story "The Bowmen"

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My grandfather was at that battle, and the story he told me when I was a child was that he and his troop were trapped in a ditch taking heavy incoming fire from the Germans, then a bright light lit up the entire battlefield. All shooting ceased for a short time which allowed them to escape the ditch and return to continue fighting with their fellow soldiers. He believed that with out that "light" he would have surely died in that ditch.

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On 29 September 1914 Welsh author Arthur Machen published a short story entitled "The Bowmen" in the London newspaper The Evening News, inspired by accounts that he had read of the fighting at Mons and an idea he had had soon after the battle.

Machen, who had already written a number of factual articles on the conflict for the paper, set his story at the time of the retreat from the Battle of Mons in August 1914. The story described phantom bowmen from the Battle of Agincourt summoned by a soldier calling on St. George, destroying a German host.[1] Machen's story was not, however, labelled as fiction and the same edition of the Evening News ran a story by a different author under the heading "Our Short Story". Additionally, Machen's story was written from a first-hand perspective and was a kind of false document, a technique Machen knew well. The unintended result was that Machen had a number of requests to provide evidence for his sources for the story soon after its publication, from readers who thought it was true, to which he responded that it was completely imaginary, as he had no desire to create a hoax.

A month or two later Machen received requests from the editors of parish magazines to reprint the story, which were granted.[1] In the introduction to The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War (1915) Machen relates that an, unnamed, priest, the editor of one of these magazines, subsequently wrote to him asking if he would allow the story to be reprinted in pamphlet form, and if he would write a short preface giving sources for the story. Machen replied that they were welcome to reprint but he could not give any sources for the story since he had none. The priest replied that Machen must be mistaken, that the "facts" of the story must be true, and that Machen had just elaborated on a true account. As Machen later said:

It seemed that my light fiction had been accepted by the congregation of this particular church as the solidest of facts; and it was then that it began to dawn on me that if I had failed in the art of letters, I had succeeded, unwittingly, in the art of deceit. This happened, I should think, some time in April, and the snowball of rumour that was then set rolling has been rolling ever since, growing bigger and bigger, till it is now swollen to a monstrous size.

—Arthur Machen, Introduction to The Bowmen and Other Legends of the War[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angels_of_Mons

You beat me to it. Though I'm sure zoser will be along shortly to proclaim it truth.

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I thought I read this was all a story printed in a newspaper. It was a kind of early 20th century creepy pasta. There was no sightings at all and it was fabricated. In fact I think that very story was on this website, though maybe it was the Fortean Times.

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I think this shows how poverty stricken ufology is when they are dredging up incidents that never happened and attributing it to ufos.I have read extensively on WW1 and have only come across the Angel of Mons in reference to the myth that grew up around the story "The Bowmen"

Wonder what they have to say now, this pretty much throws their UFO theory straight out into space. As if it were not ridiculous enough to begin with!

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It certainly is one way to describe the indiscribable. I'll go with angeles this time; next time maybe aliens. :yes::alien:

Peace,

RadicalGnostic

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Posted (edited)

That would be cool if it really was aliens.we will never know for sure all the people are now dead.

Edited by coolguy

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My grandfather was at that battle, and the story he told me when I was a child was that he and his troop were trapped in a ditch taking heavy incoming fire from the Germans, then a bright light lit up the entire battlefield. All shooting ceased for a short time which allowed them to escape the ditch and return to continue fighting with their fellow soldiers. He believed that with out that "light" he would have surely died in that ditch.

Did you do any research on the story? I don't know much about it but if German solders spoke of it as well it would give the event more credence.

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Why must EVERYTHING unexplained be "aliens"?

Why couldn't it be an Angel? HMMM?? There's as much evidence for them as there is people from the Pleiades visiting us for tea and tiffin.

Because angels are aliens since they are living outside Earth. (Extra Terrestrial)

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the germans should have called their demons

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the germans should have called their demons

What demons?

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maybe a meteorite like the one i Russia recently?

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What demons?

the english had their angels rite? so the germans should have their demons. they r the baddies (at that time)..

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the english had their angels rite? so the germans should have their demons. they r the baddies (at that time)..

Umm no.

Everyone was the "bad guy" in WW1, everyone was bucking for a chance to kick the ever living heck out of someone else and the assassination of Franz Ferdinand gave them that chance.

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You beat me to it. Though I'm sure zoser will be along shortly to proclaim it truth.

Drat, you beat me to saying "you beat me to it"! I gotta start trying to keep up around here! :)

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Did you do any research on the story? I don't know much about it but if German solders spoke of it as well it would give the event more credence.

No, not at all. To be honest I had forgotten all about it till i saw the post. I do remember asking my dad about it after my grandfather had passed away and all he said was "that strange things happen sometimes"

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the english had their angels rite? so the germans should have their demons. they r the baddies (at that time)..

They were just soldiers fighting on the opposing side. That's all. If anything, those Germans would have been just as likely to be saved by an angel as anyone else.

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:gun: the angel of the mons was written by a man who did not fight so I think that you should look at the creadabilty of the whole thing

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:gun: the angel of the mons was written by a man who did not fight so I think that you should look at the creadabilty of the whole thing

The original author intended it as fiction from the beginning. There was no deception on his part. The author of this article, however, is an idiot for not doing any research and making up this piece of crap.

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