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Still Waters

Britain has ‘subculture’ of 15,000 vampires

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A psychology lecturer at a British university claims the UK has a population of some 15,000 vampires and is carrying out an academic study of their lifestyles.

The academic says vampires are not a myth but live and breathe a set of laws and ethics while meeting regularly all over the world, including the UK.

http://www.telegraph...y-lecturer.html

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Sounds like an infestation! The world gets curiouser and curiouser.

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So this is the result from his questionnaire from January?

When you send a questionnaire to a forum called Vampire community news, what do you expect?

Here is his original questionnaire to THAT forum:

http://merticus.com/vampirenews/2014/01/08/psychology-the-vampire-community-dr-emyr-williams/

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They know they are vampires, because they died when they drove a stake through their hearts...

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Posted (edited)

Reminded me of this, but yeah, vampires got widespread as a culture during the Austria-Hungary dominion over Serbian regions where the first reported case was about Petar Blagojevic.

http://abc7.com/archive/9308452/

Thanks to the numerous novels about Gothic buildings, ghosts, vampires, forbidden love etc in XVIII and XIX century the UK got infested thoroughly with the roots of supernatural because UK didn't really have such a folklore. That's why there're so many "Victorian"-based ghost stories, too. Remember the Ossianic controversy?

http://www.museumofhoaxes.com/macpherson.html

I'm not wondering about that, too. The same is happening with Merlin, the same is happening with Harry Potter.

Edited by Nenaraz
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the UK got infested thoroughly with the roots of supernatural because UK didn't really have such a folklore.

Rubbish.

Britannic folklore is fascinating and ripe with the supernatural.

"We daren't go a'hunting for a fear of little men" that sort of thing.

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Thanks to the numerous novels about Gothic buildings, ghosts, vampires, forbidden love etc in XVIII and XIX century the UK got infested thoroughly with the roots of supernatural because UK didn't really have such a folklore. That's why there're so many "Victorian"-based ghost stories, too. Remember the Ossianic controversy?

The UK has a long and rich history with all sorts of great folklore. Wee folks and ghosts. Witches and alchemists. Forbidden love going back centuries before the Victorian period. Britain Gothic goes back to the middle ages- they are one of the originating areas of Gothic architecture, along with Northern France. The UK is some of the originators of Victorian based folklore- Bram Stoker was from Ireland and living in London when he wrote Dracula. Mary Shelly was English.

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Posted (edited)

Rubbish.

Britannic folklore is fascinating and ripe with the supernatural.

"We daren't go a'hunting for a fear of little men" that sort of thing.

Erm... That's Irish and it's XIX century. : )

What's authentically British folklore next to Merlin and Harry Potter? Note the reasonable novels and works of art in literature which defined the national identity with supernatural beings. Tolkien tried to create one by taking from the Nordic countries.

Edited by Nenaraz

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Posted (edited)

I live a sheltered life. Freetoroam's link lead me to look up Therian and Otherkin and then Donor. And then Donor had me thinking about the health of my Donor if I was a vampire and that took me to all kinds of informative :w00t: search entries.

I then took an online "Are you a Real Vampire” quiz and sadly, I'm a fake... :td:

Edited by QuiteContrary
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Twilight fans running amok. :rolleyes:

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In a seperate study 85% of young men admitted to having hundreds of girlfriends.

That was a study for the Jeremy Kyle show......and they failed the lie detector.

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Erm... That's Irish and it's XIX century. : )

What's authentically British folklore next to Merlin and Harry Potter? Note the reasonable novels and works of art in literature which defined the national identity with supernatural beings. Tolkien tried to create one by taking from the Nordic countries.

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=english+folklore

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I remember the vampire subculture being relatively large in the states around the time when the Anne Rice novels were huge during the 90's. A role-playing game called Vampire: The Masquerade was also pretty popular.

More recently, a conservative named Jake Rush who was running for congress made the news for having a vampire alter-ego named Chazz Darling that he LARPed with.

As long as they're not hurting anyone, I don't see the harm. I enjoy a pretty rare steak myself.

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Britain has a subculture of 15000 sad goths more like

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Erm... That's Irish and it's XIX century. : )

What's authentically British folklore next to Merlin and Harry Potter? Note the reasonable novels and works of art in literature which defined the national identity with supernatural beings. Tolkien tried to create one by taking from the Nordic countries.

You know Ireland is part of The British Isles, and Great Britain?

Also here you go ... English Folklore.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_folklore

Fascinating, I'm sure you agree.

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Ok, I give you the Robin Hood one. : } Can the Robin Hood really be regarded as a supernatural being?

But you fellas really need to be more knacky regarding the history of the above-mentioned creatures on the Wikiwiki. Elves are not British. Irish folklore is Irish, not English. Ireland was heavily influenced by the Celtic culture which took a lot from the Balkan area leading up towards western Europe and finally Ireland. The songs are very similar.

And, yes, when I say that the British don't really have a folklore oriented literature I know what I'm talking about due to a fact that I've researched it since that's what I do. There have been attempts to make the folklore, forcefully so, because it's heavily void area of English culture. Like it or not, that's how things stand.

Also, Brownies are an awesome Scottish mythological creature and the real name is "brùnaidh". Hmm. Do you really wanna continue with the "agreement" and "fascinating" by sharing mere wikiwiki links calling it reasonable?! I doubt it.

Goblins, hobgoblins, brownies etc all fall in the notion of Fairies which all originated in the parts of Europe long before England ate with a fork.

----------------

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And yet, they exist as part of a uniquely British mythology, the forms they take within the folklore is unique to the Isles.

It's like that old joke about the English language, some languages evolve while English clubs other languages over the head and goes through their pockets looking for loose verbs.

English Folklore is a mongrel of Celtic, the Neolithic Mound Builders, the Vikings, the Danes, the Welsh (the first Britons after all, who are not Celts), the Henge builders who are as ancient as the pyramid builders, and so on all left a folkloric mark that mixed together to make what we have today as "British Folklore".

But if you insist on a WRITTEN folklore, then yes. Britain is a wasteland until Geoff of Monmouth created Arthur and Merlin.

But as oral folklore? Something kept alive by Mummers, Bards and drunken yokels who start sentences with "we don't like no strangers here"? Well... "ya'll be lookin' far tha beest of tha mooor...." every town has a beast every church was once assailed by none other the Old Nick himself, every hillock is where Arthur is buried and every tree is behind which some famous highwayman hid his ill gotten goods.

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Britain has a subculture of 15000 sad goths more like

What's sad is the football lad/laddette obsessed drunkard pewking chav majority saying "Yo", "credit crunch", "comfort zone" and "Innit".

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Ok, I give you the Robin Hood one. : } Can the Robin Hood really be regarded as a supernatural being?

But you fellas really need to be more knacky regarding the history of the above-mentioned creatures on the Wikiwiki. Elves are not British. Irish folklore is Irish, not English. Ireland was heavily influenced by the Celtic culture which took a lot from the Balkan area leading up towards western Europe and finally Ireland. The songs are very similar.

And, yes, when I say that the British don't really have a folklore oriented literature I know what I'm talking about due to a fact that I've researched it since that's what I do. There have been attempts to make the folklore, forcefully so, because it's heavily void area of English culture. Like it or not, that's how things stand.

Also, Brownies are an awesome Scottish mythological creature and the real name is "brùnaidh". Hmm. Do you really wanna continue with the "agreement" and "fascinating" by sharing mere wikiwiki links calling it reasonable?! I doubt it.

Goblins, hobgoblins, brownies etc all fall in the notion of Fairies which all originated in the parts of Europe long before England ate with a fork.

----------------

The English are European. Where are you from btw?

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Maybe that would explain the increase in British coffee consumption.

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Apparently at some Universities there's nothing important to do.

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Posted (edited)

british Vamp subculture what about american Vampires???

Edited by GhostSpy18

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I remember the vampire subculture being relatively large in the states around the time when the Anne Rice novels were huge during the 90's. A role-playing game called Vampire: The Masquerade was also pretty popular.

More recently, a conservative named Jake Rush who was running for congress made the news for having a vampire alter-ego named Chazz Darling that he LARPed with.

As long as they're not hurting anyone, I don't see the harm. I enjoy a pretty rare steak myself.

Don't we all??

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You know Ireland is part of The British Isles, and Great Britain?

Also here you go ... English Folklore.

http://en.wikipedia....nglish_folklore

Fascinating, I'm sure you agree.

Ireland isn't part of Great Britain,that consists of England,Scotland and Wales,its only geographically part of the British Isles.Northern Ireland is part of the United Kingdom but the rest of Ireland is an independent country.Its complicated but just thought I would point it out.

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