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Still Waters

Human/Chimp Genes Split 13M Years Ago

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The ancestors of humans and chimpanzees may have begun genetically diverging from one another 13 million years ago, more than twice as long ago as had been widely thought, shedding new light on the process of human evolution, researchers say.

https://news.yahoo.c...-201544343.html

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Isn't it amazing how each new discovery seems to push human development further and further back? We will find evidence of ancient civilizations pre-dating the established timeline. It's only a matter of time until that crucial piece of evidence shows up...

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Isn't it amazing how each new discovery seems to push human development further and further back? We will find evidence of ancient civilizations pre-dating the established timeline. It's only a matter of time until that crucial piece of evidence shows up...

While it's possible we may find earlier civilisations than we currently know about, the story linked in the OP doesn't provide any supporting evidence for that theory. For the vast portion of that 13 million years of divergence the fossil evidence currently shows no early/pre-humans with the brains or bodies consistent with civilisation. The dating of tools, art and bones provides an independent test of the genetic evidence.

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