Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Waspie_Dwarf

New molecules around old stars

6 posts in this topic

New molecules around old stars

17 June 2014 Using ESA’s Herschel space observatory, astronomers have discovered that a molecule vital for creating water exists in the burning embers of dying Sun-like stars.

When low- to middleweight stars like our Sun approach the end of their lives, they eventually become dense, white dwarf stars. In doing so, they cast off their outer layers of dust and gas into space, creating a kaleidoscope of intricate patterns known as planetary nebulas.

These actually have nothing to do with planets, but were named in the late 18th century by astronomer William Herschel, because they appeared as fuzzy circular objects through his telescope, somewhat like the planets in our Solar System.

arrow3.gifRead more...

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great article! I don't understand a lot about astronomy, but will never give up trying.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems the universe is a very wet place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It seems the universe is a very wet place.

How so? This is NOT liquid water that is being spoken about.

Water is a very common molecule BUT in must cases it exists as a gas or a solid, not as a liquid. It is for this reason that the habitable zones around stars are so small.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How so? This is NOT liquid water that is being spoken about.

Water is a very common molecule BUT in must cases it exists as a gas or a solid, not as a liquid. It is for this reason that the habitable zones around stars are so small.

True, What is it then? Star blood?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, What is it then? Star blood?

Is there really any point of explaining it to you as it is clearly and simply explained in the very first line of original article?

Re-read it. Continue re-reading it until some of it sinks it. Then, if you have something more constructive to say than your normal, ill-informed, scientifically illiterate wild guesses and nonsensical, rambling gibberish it may be possible to have an intelligent discussion. I'm not going to hold my breath though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.