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Professor T

Can you hear this?

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Just a question really.. and some discussion if you like..

Can you hear this image?

2ykxojn.gif

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Nope, I can hear the word "clap" in my mind ..... sort of, not in an auditory way.

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In my mind i'm thinking off, when viewing this soundless image

"WE WILL, WE WILL, ROCK YOU"

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Nope can't hear it. Interesting test

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Queen

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Nah...deaf as a door nail but yeah, Queen...

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I can't "hear" it, but yeah, I can remember the Queen song very clearly.

Oddly enough, the mental image I get is the opening from the movie

.
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Greetings, Professor

Yes.

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I don't hear it but I feel it in my ears where the noise should be.

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I don't hear it if I don't want to, but I can if I do want to. It's interesting that we can 'hear' sounds in our heads, like clapping or other sounds when we want to. Then again, we can 'see' images internally as well. Where are these sounds and images located when we experience them? Our consciousness is such an etherial thing.

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Posted (edited)

Nope

I was never able to hear the sound of one hand clapping either.

Edited by Frank Merton
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I don't hear it but I feel it in my ears where the noise should be.

I couldn’t think of the right words to explain it but… What SpiritWriter stated is close enough.

It’s almost as if the eye movement (from observing different shades and patterns) is having a residual effect on the ears.

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Posted (edited)

Interesting responses, thanks guys..

I guess one can consider this hearing with your eyes.. or perhaps the minds ear as opposed to the minds eye..

I consider the image is a visualization tool, that one can learn from I suppose.. The image evokes sounds to mind, and the sounds invoke song, which brings deeper meaning or individual memories and meanings.. Visual cue's triggering Auditory responses, or something of that nature.. From there on in, your consciousness has all it needs to build a picture, like aquatus1 did with the opening scenes of a Knights tale, or most others did by recalling Queen "we will rock you"

@ Spirit Writer, Meridian O.. I'm no expert, but don't you think that having a physical feeling in the ears where the sound should be suggests that maybe you order your major senses differently? Most people go Visual, Sound, then the rest... Your two however may order by Visual, Tactile, then the rest?

@ Frank... Have you heard of Queen in your country? "Buddy your a boy, make a big noise, playin in the street gonna be a big man some day!" I guess if the sound has never been heard before then the trigger doesn't exist..

@ ibstaK... Minds Ear, :tu: "in a non auditory way"

@ Everyone else..

Rock on..

[media=]

[/media] Edited by Professor T

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I don't hear it if I don't want to, but I can if I do want to. It's interesting that we can 'hear' sounds in our heads, like clapping or other sounds when we want to. Then again, we can 'see' images internally as well. Where are these sounds and images located when we experience them? Our consciousness is such an etherial thing.

Funny that.. Once I saw the image and got it I couldn't turn it off.

I dunno if I can answer this, but the minds eye IMO isn't just an internal seeing thing.. and I think "etheral thing" is a very good description.. When our attention is taken by a soundless image but the image evokes a sound, I think the mind's ear fills in the missing.. I can't look at the image without being drawn into hearing it.

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This is really an interesting topic, and it touches on how the brain stores memory and how humans in general remember things.

I tend to lean towards the notion that the human brain stores sensory information prioritized by the particular sense that a person tends to favor. In other words, the senses serve as "tags" for any given piece of information, and when triggered, reconstruct the context and scenario relevant to that information. In other words, memory is less a data retrieval system, and more of a cladistical system, like an internet search engine, where data is returned based on relevance and priority.

What is interesting, however, is what determines that relevance and priority. For people who react strongly to the Queen song, scenarios (the music video, movies, etc) are the first things brought up. For those who aren't that familiar with the song, they still get the pattern, but it doesn't mean much more than that. Generally speaking, the mind prioritizes scenarios by which is easiest to remember, not by which is most common.

And, of course, there is the data storage itself. People tend to favor a given sense. If you think of it in terms of getting a soda from a vending machine, a visual person is the one who will look at all the buttons, look at the change in their hand, and watch for the can. An audio person is going to be forcefully pressing the buttons, slamming the change in to hear that "ching" sound when the coin strikes the slider, and probably won't look down till he hears the can drop. A touch person will have their fingers lingering on the machine the entire time, feeling the vibrations and movement. An intuitive person might not even look at the machine while carrying out their actions, putting in the coins, pressing a button, and leaning down for the can, taking a moment before he notices that he didn't put in enough money or that his choice is sold out.

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Oddly enough, I "heard" crumpled paper first. Then Queen.

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Professor T

For the record, I heard the individual performance of the person whom you (partially) depicted, then recognized this as a common behavior (at sporting events, for example), and only then remembered that the source performance was the iconic one by Queen. I didn't indulge in sensory recall for the latter two, they were just associations that arose from what you asked.

Among the earliest introspective thoughts I can recall thinking were about this. I was five or six years old and wondered how I could hear things vividly "in my mind's ear" and yet also know that they were not actual sounds. I also wondered how I could move my arm by thinking about doing it, and yet I could also think about moving my arm without it moving.

Although I was never an actor, I did spend a lot of time during young adulthood in theaters. There are many actors who cultivate this sort of experience as part of "sense memory" exercises and role preparation. They believe doing these things helps them to give a life-like or believable performance.

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Meridian O.. I'm no expert, but don't you think that having a physical feeling in the ears where the sound should be suggests that maybe you order your major senses differently? Most people go Visual, Sound, then the rest... Your two however may order by Visual, Tactile, then the rest?

I haven’t a clue about the order of the senses…What I can tell you is that my hearing is good and also very sensitive to certain noises or pulsations.

Hence I cringe whenever I hear a Rod Stewart or Sheena Easton song.

I am an odd one though…A few years ago I broke my nose and during one of the hospital visits prior to an operation, one of the doctors tapped what looked like a tuning fork which he proceeded to hold near the middle part of my forehead. I was asked if I could hear a noise however I didn’t hear a thing. The tuning fork test was repeated but still I didn’t hear noise. I was then beginning to think that the doctor was taking the P*** but he appeared to look worried and he asked me if I was sure as it was serious. The bizarre test was carried out once more to which I told a wee fib and said that I heard it that time.

Like I stated earlier, my hearing is good and yet (at that time) I couldn’t hear anything from the tuning fork…Maybe I have a deaf spot on my forehead.

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Oh dear, tell the doctor the truth regardless of what you think he wants to hear. That's generally good advice for everyone but especially doctors.

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It is kinda neat to experiment with the control we have over our bodies. I can tell my big toe to move and it moves, or I can tell my big toe to move but not really mean it and it doesn't move. The wildest is I can tell my big toe, "Sometime in the next ten seconds I want you to move but not warn me." It will do exactly that.

My construct for what is happening is the standard conscious-subconscious stuff. Obviously the messages are being withheld from the big toe until it is to move. The big toe doesn't decide. All the detail about how to go about moving is in the brain but I don't need to know it. I just set policy -- big toe, move -- and the subconscious works out all the details and gets the job done.

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Professor T et al,

How one trained in dance doesn't hear the sound is beyond me.

After counting- or sounding-out beats between use of music in

choreography, I cannot help but hear rhythmic clapping and

pounding.

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Oddly enough, I "heard" crumpled paper first. Then Queen.

That's weird? in an interesting way..

Personally I heard it pretty much strait off, and my minds eye took me back to my high school days, sitting in the gym bleachers, 50 or so of us stomping our feet and clapping to the tune...

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Nope

I was never able to hear the sound of one hand clapping either.

Had you heard of Queen before this thread?

Am wondering because this does touch on Conditioning as well as consciousness.

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I have to say i feel and see the sound rather than hear it. I see/feel it as a vibration like an impact or something imploding by the sound of the hands. Didn't get any song or scenario connection. It might be because i have auditory dyslexia. It means i don't hold to memory as well things i hear, like verbal lists, instructions and things, but goes to visual memory very strongly.

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Had you heard of Queen before this thread?

Am wondering because this does touch on Conditioning as well as consciousness.

Well this is getting into musical taste; I am aware of the rock group and I'm sure I've heard them many times. Even when I was a teenager my taste ran to highbrow stuff and now I pretty much listen to nothing else, although much of it from the twentieth century, mostly from earlier.

My theory is that the earlier "classical" or "Western serious music" was written for a wealthy aristocracy and reflected them. Modern music is democratized and largely written and performed to make money. It therefore has different characteristics. No doubt some of it will last and join the repertoire, but I have no idea what.

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