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Waspie_Dwarf

Titan: Clue to 'Magic Island' mystery

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Titan: Clue to 'Magic Island' mystery on Saturn moon

Scientists have outlined their best explanations for a mysterious feature dubbed the "magic island", which has been spotted on Saturn's moon Titan.

The Cassini spacecraft captured the "island" during a flyby, but it had vanished by the time of the next pass.

The bright splodge is seen in Ligeia Mare, one of the seas of methane and ethane found at Titan's north pole.

Icebergs, waves and gas bubbling up from the sea bed are all possibilities, the scientists say.

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I read this article in the news, its quite interesting... Im just glad its not come up in the ET section :lol:

from the article:

"This is just further evidence, if we need it, that we just must go back to Titan with a dedicated mission, ideally to land in one of Titan's seas - a Titan Sea Probe. And then we can understand what is happening on the seas of this incredible place."

Well I for one hope they do!

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I read this article in the news, its quite interesting... Im just glad its not come up in the ET section :lol:

from the article:

"This is just further evidence, if we need it, that we just must go back to Titan with a dedicated mission, ideally to land in one of Titan's seas - a Titan Sea Probe. And then we can understand what is happening on the seas of this incredible place."

Well I for one hope they do!

Cassini is due for flybys on July 20th, August 21st, September 22nd, October 24th and December 10th http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/saturntourdates/ with the last one being as close as 609 miles.

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Cassini is due for flybys on July 20th, August 21st, September 22nd, October 24th and December 10th http://saturn.jpl.na...aturntourdates/ with the last one being as close as 609 miles.

Cheers Merc, will keep an eye out for it :tu:

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Posted (edited)

Cheers Merc, will keep an eye out for it :tu:

I know it isn't the mission you mean but at least it is something and the results should be interesting to see.

Edited by Merc14

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Crazy, it's really unbelievable how much we've left to discover about our own solar system. I cannot wait until technology allows us to delve deeper into these mysteries.

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It's Fantasy Island. Tattoo is waiting for you.

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It's Fantasy Island. Tattoo is waiting for you.

I was thinking the same thing. "The Rocket boss, the Rocket"
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Maybe Titan has its own "Nessie?" :whistle:

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Posted (edited)

We invested so much money in a deserted mars looking for life as we know it when life as we not know it might be somewhere else. On titan for instance!

Edited by qxcontinuum

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We invested so much money in a deserted mars looking for life as we know it when life as we not know it might be somewhere else. On titan for instance!

We didn't go to Mars to find living creatures, we went to see if life may have once existed, which would be an amazing find. As far as life on Titan, the placid lakes on Titan's surface are comprised of liquid ethane or liquid methane, the surface temperature is -179 Celsius and the possible subsurface water is fully mixed with ammonia. There may be some form of primordial life on Titan but it isn't flying spaceships around like you may wish.

Cassini Huygens landed a craft, the Huygens probe, on Titan in 2005 and Cassini is still actively exploring Titan with its myriad instruments. My point is the we certainly aren't ignoring Titan as we have been actively exploring it for nearly a decade and will continue doing so until near the end of the decade at least.

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Posted (edited)

We didn't go to Mars to find living creatures, we went to see if life may have once existed, which would be an amazing find. As far as life on Titan, the placid lakes on Titan's surface are comprised of liquid ethane or liquid methane, the surface temperature is -179 Celsius and the possible subsurface water is fully mixed with ammonia. There may be some form of primordial life on Titan but it isn't flying spaceships around like you may wish.

Based on what we have discovered so far on Mars, inclusing river beds, earth like alkalinity, has had atmosphere and organic compounds, can we just say Mars has hosted life before , closing the exploration chapter and move to Titan already? The whole Mars thing it is becoming too expensive , too long , looks like some details photographed are often ignored or improperly analysed what's the point anyway continuing doing .

Sooner the world war 3 will start and will wipe out civilisation as we know it . Here is our change to quickly explore everything we can faster as long we still have money and time. Graduated steps and safe planning might not bring a good turn over.

Edited by qxcontinuum
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"This is just further evidence, if we need it, that we just must go back to Titan with a dedicated mission, ideally to land in one of Titan's seas - a Titan Sea Probe. And then we can understand what is happening on the seas of this incredible place."

Hydrocarbons? I'm sure Exxon will foot the bill...

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Its Morla the tortoise from The NeverEnding Story. :yes:

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Fascinating, be interested to see if there are some tidal forces being exerted on those hydrocrabon oceans, or if the atmosphere coupled with the actual liquid has another effect we have not seen before.... or they could have found the Titan-ness monster (joke lol) :w00t:

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I am curious how it has been established that the liquid mass on Titan is hydrocarbon! Or its atmosphere components ?

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Based on what we have discovered so far on Mars, inclusing river beds, earth like alkalinity, has had atmosphere and organic compounds, can we just say Mars has hosted life before , closing the exploration chapter and move to Titan already? The whole Mars thing it is becoming too expensive , too long , looks like some details photographed are often ignored or improperly analysed what's the point anyway continuing doing .

Sooner the world war 3 will start and will wipe out civilisation as we know it . Here is our change to quickly explore everything we can faster as long we still have money and time. Graduated steps and safe planning might not bring a good turn over.

Earth-like conditions in no way guarantees the existence of life in the past of present

I am curious how it has been established that the liquid mass on Titan is hydrocarbon! Or its atmosphere components ?

Firmly established that it is hydrocarbon and the temperature is far to low for liquid surface water which you would know if you had read the article or even my post.

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Posted (edited)

In the bottom right corner I see a figure, a titanasquatch. I am now the first in history, to have a bigfoot sighting on Titan. I will post my sighting info at the BFRO website and wait for an investigator to go and verify my claim. I have never been the first at anything, this is a big deal to me. I Would like to say thanks to ...

Edited by maximusnow
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Hydrocarbons? I'm sure Exxon will foot the bill...

Can you imagine the price of gas if we starting shipping crude oil from Titan? OPEC would be laughing all the way to the bank as I'm sure tey wouldn't try to under cut the "import"

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Based on what we have discovered so far on Mars, inclusing river beds, earth like alkalinity, has had atmosphere and organic compounds, can we just say Mars has hosted life before , closing the exploration chapter and move to Titan already? The whole Mars thing it is becoming too expensive , too long , looks like some details photographed are often ignored or improperly analysed what's the point anyway continuing doing .

Sooner the world war 3 will start and will wipe out civilisation as we know it . Here is our change to quickly explore everything we can faster as long we still have money and time. Graduated steps and safe planning might not bring a good turn over.

As I've said before WE ARE THE MARTIANS!
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Surely, there has got to be a natural ebb and flow of these hydrocarbon lakes? The lakes reduce in volume (due to external forcing) so exposing rock, then increase in volume (when the natural forcing is not apparent)and submerge these rocky outcrops again.

This is not Rocket Science people, it just strikes me as a natural occurrence.

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Surely, there has got to be a natural ebb and flow of these hydrocarbon lakes? The lakes reduce in volume (due to external forcing) so exposing rock, then increase in volume (when the natural forcing is not apparent)and submerge these rocky outcrops again.

This is not Rocket Science people, it just strikes me as a natural occurrence.

Space.com has a before and after montage they do and that is exactly what it looks like.

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Could it be a solid hydrocarbon iceberg like thing? Something like an iceberg called a Growler? Something flat virtually touching the water that very low waves could wash over? Something equivalent to fat or very thick grease floating in a chip pan? If so I was wondering if it could be created by a deep gas pocket rising to the surface. As it does so the outside pressure on the bubble drops allowing it to expand, and as it expands it gets colder. The result is a shell forming around the bubble.

iMUei.jpg

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Could it be a solid hydrocarbon iceberg like thing? Something like an iceberg called a Growler? Something flat virtually touching the water that very low waves could wash over? Something equivalent to fat or very thick grease floating in a chip pan? If so I was wondering if it could be created by a deep gas pocket rising to the surface. As it does so the outside pressure on the bubble drops allowing it to expand, and as it expands it gets colder. The result is a shell forming around the bubble.

Ir seemed like the surrounding shoreline was exposed as well http://www.space.com/26325-cassini-titan-waves-magic-island.html

I like the iceberg thing though, but how would a Liquid ethyl berg float in a liquid ethyl lake and is that even possible? Too cold I think

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Posted (edited)

How about a Maree cycle. I mean Saturn is huge. I am sure it has a magnetic influence over everything that is liquid on Titan?

Edited by qxcontinuum

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