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Still Waters

'Mystery coin' found in Jersey hoard

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A "mystery coin" has been uncovered as part of work to discover the secrets of the world's largest Celtic coin hoard.

Jersey Heritage conservator, Neil Mahrer, is working on separating the coins in full view of the public at the Jersey Museum.

He said so far experts had not been able to work out its origins due to an unusual "geometric pattern".

http://www.bbc.co.uk...jersey-27943738

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Reminds me Etruscan work.

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WOW, very interesting.

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I love coins, they really are beautiful objects to me.

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That's a cool coin thanks for psoting

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How old is the coin?

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How old is the coin?

Strictly speaking, the Romans called the Brittany peninsular Amorica in the Classic period and occupied it in about 50BC, but it's unlikely that the coin is that old. I guess that if it really is Amorican it could date anywhere between 340AD up until 936AD when Brittany was overrun by Viking-descended Normans. (Who would have issued their own currency as a matter of course.) Also, by this time, Brittany had become so weak that the kings re-titled themselves as dukes.

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Strictly speaking, the Romans called the Brittany peninsular Amorica in the Classic period and occupied it in about 50BC, but it's unlikely that the coin is that old. I guess that if it really is Amorican it could date anywhere between 340AD up until 936AD when Brittany was overrun by Viking-descended Normans. (Who would have issued their own currency as a matter of course.) Also, by this time, Brittany had become so weak that the kings re-titled themselves as dukes.

The Vikings were pretty flexible in as far as the currency they used. In some hoards found in Nordic countries coins from all places and times were found. In theory it could have even been used in Viking times.

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