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3D imaging to solve Terracotta Army mystery

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A new 3D imaging technique could finally determine whether the warriors were based on real soldiers.

Discovered in 1974 by farmers in China's Shaanxi province, the army of 8,000 immaculately crafted ancient warriors is considered to be one of the most important archaeological finds in history.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...ta-army-mystery

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Posted (edited)

It would not have been all that incredibly difficult to model them after real people... Just make a casting of the mans head, and presto... You have an exact likeness...

Now whether they did it that way or not is another matter...

Edited by Taun
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So somebody got money for a 3D imaging technique to verify what the naked eye could already tell?

That those different soldiers are different?

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Was thinking the same thing bubblykiss and damn you for making me type bubblykiss!

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So somebody got money for a 3D imaging technique to verify what the naked eye could already tell?

That those different soldiers are different?

First thought that popped into my head was this.

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First thought that popped into my head was this.

And my second thought was "How do I get a job like that?"

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My second thought was the guy who wrote the grant proposal is a genius.

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And my second thought was "How do I get a job like that?"

First you need to be called a Doctor of something or at least the "expert" in a field and then find someone that has more money than they know what to do with.
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Regardless of who they are based on, they are awesome to look at. Such an incredible amount of skill and patience to make these. Incredible.

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It's fascinating so many ancient cultures from all over the world believed in an afterlife that you could take something with you. Monotheism is so boring.

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Was thinking the same thing bubblykiss and damn you for making me type bubblykiss!

Assuming you are male, you can hand in your Man-card at any Police Station or Post Office branch.

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Assuming you are male, you can hand in your Man-card at any Police Station or Post Office branch.

Sorry, you'll have to get it off my ex!

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nce

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nce

*crash* There goes an "i".

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What if they are statues made from the alikeness of the fallen ones as commemorative process. It it was an important war they were simply heroes whose figures should have remained in time.

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Update -

Statistical analysis revealed that no two ears in the small sample group were exactly the same. Indeed, the degree of variability resembled a human population. This preliminary finding lends credence to the idea that the ancient artists were aiming for realism.

"Based on this initial sample, the terra-cotta army looks like a series of portraits of real warriors," says UCL archaeologist Marcos Martinon-Torres.

http://news.national...na-archaeology/

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I've always wondered if every one of those figures was an accurate representation of a soldier that was sacrificed at the time of the Emperors death to accompany and protect him in the afterlife.

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