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Waspie_Dwarf

Titan's Ocean as Salty as the Dead Sea?

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Ocean on Saturn Moon Could be as Salty as the Dead Sea

Scientists analyzing data from NASA’s Cassini mission have firm evidence the ocean inside Saturn's largest moon, Titan, might be as salty as the Earth's Dead Sea.

The new results come from a study of gravity and topography data collected during Cassini's repeated flybys of Titan during the past 10 years. Using the Cassini data, researchers presented a model structure for Titan, resulting in an improved understanding of the structure of the moon's outer ice shell. The findings are published in this week’s edition of the journal Icarus.

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As long as it doesn't contain nuts.

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So all we need now is an artificial sun to put in orbit with Titan to thaw it out so we can move there after we finished raping the Earth of its resources.

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Posted (edited)

It is mind blowing to me how light spectrums give us so much information about the type and quantity of chemicals on a celestial body. I understand the idea; it’s just that it could be altered. It makes me wonder if they could be wrong in distant objects, wouldn't gravitational lensing or cloud gases change the spectrum? How do we really know what lies below the ice?

Edited by maximusnow

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Ok ,it is not possible for scientist to make such assumptions . There is absolutely no data confirmed or extracted or extrapolated, etc that can lead someone to this conclusion.

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They won't know if its ocean is salt water unless u build something that can land there

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Ok ,it is not possible for scientist to make such assumptions . There is absolutely no data confirmed or extracted or extrapolated, etc that can lead someone to this conclusion.

Really! Funny that because the scientists seem to disagree with you.

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i was always under the impression that the oceans' salinity came from dissolved minerals?

wouldn't that be difficult on a world that's made of "water"?

or are they saying there's some kind of geology at the core that's leeching minerals?

a captured meteor

maybe,

that water/ice condensed around...?

.

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i was always under the impression that the oceans' salinity came from dissolved minerals?

wouldn't that be difficult on a world that's made of "water"?

These "ice" worlds are far from being pure water. Even comets are "dirty balls", water ice mixed with other minerals.

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These "ice" worlds are far from being pure water. Even comets are "dirty balls", water ice mixed with other minerals.

.

but, enough 'dirt' to salinate an entire moon?

that's a lot of dirt.

but it's space after all, so who knows.....

.

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but, enough 'dirt' to salinate an entire moon?

that's a lot of dirt.

You don't need to salinate the entire moon, just the ocean... and it's far less salt than is needed on Earth or (it would seem) Mars.

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Posted (edited)

You don't need to salinate the entire moon, just the ocean...

.

but i thought that in Titan's case, it's ocean WAS its moon? by that i mean that there's nothing discernably solid there, as far as we can tell?

.

[edited for double post.]

.

Edited by shrooma

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Checking up on the structure of Titan it is far from being made of ice. It has a radius of 2576 Km of which 2,000 Km is a silicate core. The liquid ocean, sandwiched between two layer of ice, is relatively shallow.

Plenty of minerals to salinate the ocean.

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Posted (edited)

Checking up on the structure of Titan it is far from being made of ice. It has a radius of 2576 Km of which 2,000 Km is a silicate core. The liquid ocean, sandwiched between two layer of ice, is relatively shallow.

Plenty of minerals to salinate the ocean.

.

thank's for the gen Waspie.

now i know.

and that's better than not knowing.

.

Edited by shrooma

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