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DieChecker

Arctic Sea Ice at record maximum

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http://stevengoddard.wordpress.com/2014/07/02/antarctic-sea-ice-hits-second-all-time-record-in-a-week/

Antarctic sea ice has hit its second all-time record maximum this week. The new record is 2.112 million square kilometers above normal. Until the weekend just past, the previous record had been 1.840 million square kilometers above normal, a mark hit on December 20, 2007

I thought polar bears were able to swim across from Norway to Alaska........ I thought the North West Passage was going to be a commonly navigable waterway now.

Maybe not?

indicating that, somewhat counter-intuitively, the sea ice growth was specifically due to global warming.

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Posted (edited)

http://stevengoddard...cord-in-a-week/

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I thought polar bears were able to swim across from Norway to Alaska........ I thought the North West Passage was going to be a commonly navigable waterway now.

Maybe not?

Could the earth be turning by a magnetic shift causing the part of the Antarctic to melt while the other part is building up the ice ? Nothing to do with global warming

Edited by docyabut2
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Could the earth be turning by a magnetic shift causing the part of the Antarctic to melt while the other part is building up the ice ? Nothing to do with global warming

That's not a thing.

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It also appears that the Antarctic has a more then usual amount of ice.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2681829/Global-warming-latest-Amount-Antarctic-sea-ice-hits-new-record-high.html

The levels of Antarctic sea-ice last week hit an all-time high – confounding climate change computer models which say it should be in decline.

America’s National Snow And Ice Data Center, which is funded by Nasa, revealed that ice around the southern continent covers about 16million sq km, more than 2.1 million more than is usual for the time of year.

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Not holding my breath until this starts happening year after year...

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Posted (edited)

Sea ice and land ice are two different systems. To dismiss climate change based on seasonal sea ice levels is pointless.

Edited by Imaginarynumber1

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Sea ice and land ice are two different systems. To dismiss climate change based on seasonal sea ice levels is pointless.

isnt sea ice the Canary in the coal mine? Computer models show sea ice reduction year on year, while actual measurements show the opposite

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isnt sea ice the Canary in the coal mine? Computer models show sea ice reduction year on year, while actual measurements show the opposite

Sea formation has to do with ocean currents and upwupwelling waters. In the antarctic the winds and coriolis effect draw waters to the north where they warm while that water pulled up is replaced by colder, deeper waters.

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Posted (edited)

isnt sea ice the Canary in the coal mine? Computer models show sea ice reduction year on year, while actual measurements show the opposite

I think it shows that our climate experts are not as expert as they want us to believe.

I mean the weatherman on the news has trouble predicting if it is going to rain tomorrow or not. They will give percentages, like 66% chance of rain. The best we can do, even on a next day basis is a slightly better then random level of guessing. Which is actually all done by a computer.

Edited by DieChecker

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I think it shows that our climate experts are not as expert as they want us to believe.

I wouldn't be too quick to write them off. For one thing, according to this article (http://www.theguardian.com/environment/climate-consensus-97-per-cent/2014/jul/07/antarctic-sea-ice-latest-global-warming-distraction) the amount of sea ice gained in Antarctica is one-tenth of the sea ice lost in the Arctic Sea. For another thing, it's one set of data points to place against the loss of land ice in places like Greenland and, well, Antarctica. And remember, while sea ice gained or lost doesn't affect ocean height, land ice lost does increase ocean levels.

I mean the weatherman on the news has trouble predicting if it is going to rain tomorrow or not. They will give percentages, like 66% chance of rain. The best we can do, even on a next day basis is a slightly better then random level of guessing. Which is actually all done by a computer.

Yes, that's weather, which isn't climate. That's like watching Babe Ruth once and seeing him strike out, and asking why people thought he was such a good batter.

In any case, how bad is weather forecasting? Have you actually bothered to check how accurate forecasts are? In my experience even the seven day forecasts are useful.

Regardless, weather forecasting is tricky. If the winds pushing a front change direction by a couple of degrees or gain or lose a couple of kilometres an hour, that rain-bearing cloud will be in a different state to what the forecasters said a day earlier.

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I wouldn't be too quick to write them off. For one thing, according to this article (http://www.theguardi...ing-distraction) the amount of sea ice gained in Antarctica is one-tenth of the sea ice lost in the Arctic Sea. For another thing, it's one set of data points to place against the loss of land ice in places like Greenland and, well, Antarctica. And remember, while sea ice gained or lost doesn't affect ocean height, land ice lost does increase ocean levels.

This is true, but you are referencing Known data. How are we to know that their future predictions are any good, if their past predictions fail to materialize?|

All we can do is assume they are correct and act to make things better, but really we're still just assuming.

Yes, that's weather, which isn't climate. That's like watching Babe Ruth once and seeing him strike out, and asking why people thought he was such a good batter.

Yes, but if you go to a game and watch 5 innings and Babe Ruth sucked till then, how can you trust that everyone says he is good when he comes up to bat again?

And I don't think Climate Models have decades of success to back them up like Babe Ruth did in baseball.

In any case, how bad is weather forecasting? Have you actually bothered to check how accurate forecasts are? In my experience even the seven day forecasts are useful.

Depends on what part of the nation you are in, I think. Here on the northern end of the US west coast, the winds change quickly and the News can be reporting sunny clear skys and you look out and it is overcast.

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