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Waspie_Dwarf

Sun Sends More 'Tsunami Waves' to Voyager 1

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Sun Sends More 'Tsunami Waves' to Voyager 1

NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has experienced a new "tsunami wave" from the sun as it sails through interstellar space. Such waves are what led scientists to the conclusion, in the fall of 2013, that Voyager had indeed left our sun's bubble, entering a new frontier.

"Normally, interstellar space is like a quiet lake," said Ed Stone of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, California, the mission's project scientist since 1972. "But when our sun has a burst, it sends a shock wave outward that reaches Voyager about a year later. The wave causes the plasma surrounding the spacecraft to sing."

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It has recently been announced that Voyager 1 has officially departed the Solar System and is in Interstellar space! This is a huge achievement that took 36 years to accomplish...

Farewell Voyager, long may you travel...

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/

Here are a few songs in commemoration...

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I thought they already made their minds up about that. Anyway, bon voyage vger.

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Wouldn't it be funny, if in a hundred million years, it hit the Earth again?

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QUOTE-

Whether this will really be the final

word on the matter however remains

to be seen.

.

not according to a documentary i saw called 'Star Trek-the motion picture'

.

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Wouldn't it be funny, if in a hundred million years, it hit the Earth again?

Considering how much we know about 'the edge of the Solar system' it could just bounce off 'something' and return back :)

I guess it will take next 5 years, at least, to confirm that Vojager 1 is in interstellar space. I was sure that it has gotten there last year :(

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So if i understand correctly, when there's no more sun's plasma hitting the Voyager probe, they will assume it went out the sun's reach, therefore out of the solar system? I am just wondering how do they know this probe is travelling straight ahead and not simply moving in circles within our solar system boundaries.

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This certainly emphasizes the futility of traveling to another star system given our current level of technology, 36 years and we are only now leaving our own solar system. And this, I believe, is the fastest object humanity has launched into space, due largely to the "sling-shot" effect of using the gravity of the outer planets. No one who launches a probe to another star will live long enough to know if it arrived. :(

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It has recently been announced that Voyager 1 has officially departed the Solar System and is in Interstellar space! This is a huge achievement that took 36 years to accomplish...

Farewell Voyager, long may you travel...

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/

Always one of my favorite bands, Mike Pinder was masterful on the mellotron and Justin Hayward has such a soulful voice and expressive guitar.

[media=]

[/media]
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Considering how much we know about 'the edge of the Solar system' it could just bounce off 'something' and return back :

.

i reckon, Sir, that if it was gonna hit something that, at that speed, would make it rebound, it wouldn't do it any favours at all!

besides, we all know we'll be seeing it again in 2273, when it comes back in Blofeld mode for some unfathomable reason.

.

or summat....

.

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So if i understand correctly, when there's no more sun's plasma hitting the Voyager probe, they will assume it went out the sun's

reach, therefore out of the solar system? I am just wondering how do they know this probe is travelling straight ahead and not

simply moving in circles within our solar system boundaries.

It`still sending signals so its position and track can be determinated well.

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It`still sending signals so its position and track can be determinated well.

.

pretty obvious, really.

.

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This is awesome this thing is still working.

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This certainly emphasizes the futility of traveling to another star system given our current level of technology, 36 years and we are only now leaving our own solar system. And this, I believe, is the fastest object humanity has launched into space, due largely to the "sling-shot" effect of using the gravity of the outer planets. No one who launches a probe to another star will live long enough to know if it arrived. :(

Not if NASA's warp drive works...

http://www.extremetech.com/extreme/184143-nasa-unveils-its-futuristic-warp-drive-starship-called-enterprise-of-course

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Posted (edited)

Talk about bang for your buck!

Just think in 40 years the kids of that generation will be saying Vouger I is a hoax. And Nostradamus predicted it.

Edited by MyOtherAccount
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What do scientist consider the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space?

The last planet or The Oort Cloud?

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What do scientist consider the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space?

The last planet or The Oort Cloud?

None of both. The region that marks the border of the solar system is called Heliopause, the outer layer of the Heliosphere

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heliosphere

http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/

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What do scientist consider the boundary between our solar system and interstellar space?

The last planet or The Oort Cloud?

Certainly not the last planet. The last known planet is Neptune which would Pluto and other Kuiper belt objects outside the solar system... which is clearly nonsensical.

The region that marks the border of the solar system is called Heliopause, the outer layer of the Heliosphere

This is the border of the solar system in terms of the Sun's influence by way of energetic particles. The solar wind no longer rules and the interstellar wind takes precedence. It is a measurable boundary to the solar system; a point at which interstellar space can be detected.

However:

The sun's gravitational influence extends far further than this. The Oort Cloud may extend a quarter of the way to the next star, a whole light year from the sun. These objects are in orbit around the sun and are, therefore, part of the solar system. The problem here is that measuring the furthest extent of the sun's gravitational influence is not possible. Gravity diminishes according to an inverse square law. Hypothetically the sun's gravitational field would be detectable at an infinite distance away if you had an infinitely sensitive instrument to measure it. Determining the furthest extent of the solar system in terns of gravity is just not possible with the precision that that the furthest extent of the heliosphere can measured.

The reality is that some solar system objects orbit the sun whilst being in interstellar space.

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Was just thinking about gravity, thanks for info Waspie_Dwarf. Considering that the Sun is moving very fast around center of galaxy ( i find speed is 220km/s, from wikipedia ) is it possible that Voyager 1 can leave the Suns gravity influence at all? And if it do leave at some point we would loose contact with it forever anyway.

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