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California drought sees dowsers in demand

69 posts in this topic

Dowsers have been seeing a lot of work lately thanks to a third consecutive year of drought.

The controversial method for discovering water buried beneath the ground has been used for thousands of years despite there being no conclusive evidence or explanation to support the notion that the technique actually works.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/269137/california-drought-sees-dowsers-in-demand

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Shoot me... Shoot me now...

I don't want to live on the planet infested with gullibility and stupidity anymore...

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Desperate times, desperate measures. Time for scientists and inventors to step up to the plate with effective small-scale solutions.

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Witchcraft and Quackery,desalination plants may have to be considered in the future if they can come up with ways to reduce high running costs.

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How would they expect a dead twig would know the way to water? After all it's dead, yes? Apparently it didn't know its way to water whilst it was still alive.

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Witchcraft and Quackery,desalination plants may have to be considered in the future if they can come up with ways to reduce high running costs.

Desalination plants, yes. Witchcraft and other forms of woo, no.

Sadly when most people don't know what else to do then they resort to woo and pseudo "science".

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Posted (edited)

How would they expect a dead twig would know the way to water? After all it's dead, yes? Apparently it didn't know its way to water whilst it was still alive.

You bring up a specific point believe it or not unknown to you.

The dowser that trained me ( in a castle off the grid ) so no confusions over emf etc - said don't try to do this when you have just drank water. The thirstier you are the better it works, no one knows why, it just is.. I wasn't using wood sticks btw i was using copper rods that are very conductive to my energies and what i am intentionally programming for. The whole point is intention via a conduit.

That is what works.

You see the twigs as dead, i don't. They are thirsty and their plant consciousness which operates more openly than we even know how to, knows innately where moisture/water is.

Edited by bLu3 de 3n3rgy
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You bring up a specific point believe it or not unknown to you.

The dowser that trained me ( in a castle off the grid ) so no confusions over emf etc - said don't try to do this when you have just drank water. The thirstier you are the better it works, no one knows why, it just is.. I wasn't using wood sticks btw i was using copper rods that are very conductive to my energies and what i am intentionally programming for. The whole point is intention via a conduit.

That is what works.

You see the twigs as dead, i don't. They are thirsty and their plant consciousness which operates more openly than we even know how to, knows innately where moisture/water is.

My first thought is "cool story bro" haha, but i saw it done once and was impressed by the results, so it will get no argument from me.

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When I was a child, we relied on my grandfathers skill as a dowser to find water for us, which had we not had, we would have either relocated (not an option at the time) or suffered horribly, perhaps even died.

He never failed and lived well enough....

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The whole point is intention via a conduit.

That is what works.

You see the twigs as dead, i don't. They are thirsty and their plant consciousness which operates more openly than we even know how to, knows innately where moisture/water is.

.

good point Blue.

with water being the absolute prerequisit for life on earth, doesn't it make sense that we would evolve a way of sensing it to ensure our continued existence....

.

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Here's a challenge to the debunkers:

Get two wire coat-hangers, a pair of wire cutters,and a couple of wide drinking straws. Cut the bottom straight length from each hanger. Bend both of the straight pieces of wire, roughly at the halfway point,90 degrees to form a right angle. Cut the straws to where, when you hold them in your hands,they barely show at either end. Now, put one of the wires in each straw. (The purpose of the straw is to allow the wire freedom of movement without the person holding it influencing that movement in any way).

Now, go outside--to your back yard, an empty field--some place where you have freedom of movement. Hold the wires, inserted in the straws, loosely, one in each hand. If the area you chose to walk has buried electrical cables, gas lines, water pipes, or a natural underground water source, as you walk, the rods will start to move. When they cross, or point away from each other (without any input from you), you can rest assured that you've just located one of the things mentioned above. If you continue walking the area, you can begin to "map" the source.

Try it. If it doesn't work at the first location, try one where you know there's an underground pipeline. It will work. It ain't voodoo, folks. My guess is that it has something to do with electromagnetism. Most wire coat-hangers are made of steel--they're magnetic.

Instead of blowing it off, spend a little time experimenting. You'll surprise yourself.

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This challenge has already been done. James Randi did extensive experiments on dowsing and wrote large articles on the results of the experiments.

Summary: it didn't work and it doesn't work. No professional dowsers were ever able to find any water in controlled conditions.

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It ain't voodoo, folks. My guess is that it has something to do with electromagnetism. Most wire coat-hangers are made of steel--they're magnetic.

Do you know how a compass works? It detects Earth's magnetic field to locate north (more or less). Incredibly they continue to do this even when near water sources.

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Do you know how a compass works? It detects Earth's magnetic field to locate north (more or less). Incredibly they continue to do this even when near water sources.

.

CCC didn't mention compass' Scowl, just electromagnetism.

.

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Posted (edited)

Instead of blowing it off, spend a little time experimenting. You'll surprise yourself.

.

i've been dowsing for years CCC, and have somewhere around an 80% success rate.

how does it work? dunno.

i can't include electromagnetism, as i dowse using a pendulum, asking it questions, so i'm not really sensing electromagnetism caused by water moving through rock.

all i can say is that it (usually!) works for me....

.

(...and welcome to UM CCC....)

.

Edited by shrooma

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CCC didn't mention compass' Scowl, just electromagnetism.

And how do compasses work, shrooma?

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i've been dowsing for years CCC, and have somewhere around an 80% success rate.

You need to contact the James Randi Foundation and have your ability tested. If you can show an 80% success rate under controlled conditions you will be paid one million dollars, no strings attached.

Do this immediately.

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And how do compasses work, shrooma?

.

you're confusing electromagnetism & magnetism Scowl.

compasses work by aligning themselves with the earth's magnetic field, but can easily be sent haywire when passed close to an electromagnetic field, such as the ones generated by water flowing through rock, which is probably what dowsers are able to sense.

we need water to survive.

you can sense electric fields easily enough- hair standing on end etc.

so it makes sense that we'd develop a way of finding underground water by sensing the electromagnetic fields it generates when it moves through rock....

.

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You need to contact the James Randi Foundation and have your ability tested. If you can show an 80% success rate under controlled conditions you will be paid one million dollars, no strings attached.

Do this immediately.

.

james "everything's s**t" randi wouldn't be happy with 80% dude.

if you were right the first 5 times & wrong on the 6th, he'd claim 'fail' and keep earning interest on his million dollars.

never trust an illusionist with an agenda....

;-)

.

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Posted (edited)

.

you're confusing electromagnetism & magnetism Scowl.

And for some reason you think they are different.

compasses work by aligning themselves with the earth's magnetic field, but can easily be sent haywire when passed close to an electromagnetic field, such as the ones generated by water flowing through rock, which is probably what dowsers are able to sense.

First, there is no difference between a magnetic field generated by the Earth or by an electrical source.

Second, water flowing through rock does not generate a magnetic field.

Third, very few underground water sources flow anywhere. Water tends to go straight down and then stay there.

Everything about your theory is wrong.

we need water to survive.

And detecting water a hundred feet beneath the surface helps us how?

you can sense electric fields easily enough- hair standing on end etc.

You're confusing magnetism with electrical fields. You really need to learn more about this.

so it makes sense that we'd develop a way of finding underground water by sensing the electromagnetic fields it generates when it moves through rock....

And such fields would easily be detected with extremely sensitive magnetic detectors and would be used every day to drill wells. But they don't detect these fields because they do not exist.

Edited by scowl

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Posted (edited)

.

james "everything's s**t" randi wouldn't be happy with 80% dude.

So you haven't looked into this, have you? You have to demonstrate an ability greater than chance. If you don't know what that means, 80% is much greater than chance.

http://en.wikipedia....ormal_Challenge

if you were right the first 5 times & wrong on the 6th, he'd claim 'fail' and keep earning interest on his million dollars.

Wrong. You really need to go to the web site and read about it. You're only talking yourself out of winning a million dollars. Wouldn't a million dollars be great?

In any case many dowsers have taken Randi up on the challenge back in 1979. They failed to find any water using a number of techniques. They even failed testing water flowing through rocks. They never found the water.

http://www.randi.org/library/dowsing/

never trust an illusionist with an agenda...

Never trust an outlandish claim on the Internet.

Edited by scowl

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Posted (edited)

And for some reason you think they are different.

.

yes, because they are.

electromagnetism is generated by an electric field, magnetism isn't.

that's the difference.

.

First, there is no difference between a magnetic field generated by the Earth or by an electrical source.

.

see above for Mag. 101 explanation.

.

Second, water flowing through water does not generate a magnetic field.

.

i'm assuming that's a typo, and you meant to say 'water flowing through rock does not generate a magnetic field'

again, you'd be wrong-

http://magneticuniverse.com/discussion/19/aquifer-limestone-granitt-ionizing-of-air/p1#axzz37NNe6Tmo

.

Third, very few underground water sources flow anywhere. Water tends to go straight down and then stay there.

.

nope.

google 'blind spring'.

.

Everything about your theory is wrong.

.

nothing about it is wrong.

whatsoever.

.

And detecting water a hundred feet beneath the surface helps us how?

.

umm..., by knowing where to dig...?!

.

You're confusing magnetism with electrical fields.

.

no. i'm not.

but you seem to be having trouble with how both relate to each other.

.

You really need to learn more about this.

.

.....

.

And such fields would easily be detected with extremely sensitive magnetic detectors

.

as they are.

.

and would be used every day to drill wells.

.

again, they are- ask any geophysical survey team worth its salt...

.

But they don't detect these fields

.

yes, they do.

.

because they do not exist.

.

yes. they do.

.

Edited by shrooma
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Posted (edited)

.

yes. they do.

.

*snip*

Your link claimed that "Mechanical engineers from the University of Alberta" were able to generate an electrical current through tap water. Now if you bother to look up the important details of the experiment, you would find that under the most ideal conditions, this electrical current was a pathetic 1,500 nanoamps.

http://physicsworld....city-from-water

Since you think that electromagnetic fields are different from magnetic fields, so you probably have no clue how little current 1,500 nanoamps is. You actually have larger currents flowing in your brain while you read this text, yet somehow you think such currents are detectable through a hundred feet of dirt. What a different world this would be if that were true.

And, no, hydrogeologists (the people who locate wells) do not search for water with magnetic detectors. They look for underground faults that direct and trap water. Perhaps you misunderstood what they were doing with their equipment.

All of your claims have been made out of complete ignorance of laws about electricity and magnetism which have been understood for over 150 years.

Edited by bLu3 de 3n3rgy
unnecessary comment

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So you haven't looked into this, have you? You have to demonstrate an ability greater than chance. If you don't know what that means, 80% is much greater than chance.

http://en.wikipedia....ormal_Challenge

Wrong. You really need to go to the web site and read about it. You're only talking yourself out of winning a million dollars. Wouldn't a million dollars be great?

In any case many dowsers have taken Randi up on the challenge back in 1979. They failed to find any water using a number of techniques. They even failed testing water flowing through rocks. They never found the water.

http://www.randi.org/library/dowsing/

.

it would be interesting, 30yrs down the line, to try the test again....

.

Never trust an outlandish claim on the Internet.

.

i never do.

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Posted (edited)

.

wrong.

again.

have your posts been made under the influence of too much caffeine?

or just a lack of source material.

.

Geez, you don't even know how to use quote tags!

.

of course i do.

but please, enlighten me- how would quote tags let me address individual sentences, eh?

they don't.

do they.

.

Your link claimed that "Mechanical engineers from the University of Alberta" were able to generate an electrical current through tap water. Now if you bother to look up the important details of the experiment, you would find that under the most ideal conditions, this electrical current was a pathetic 1,500 nanoamps.

http://physicsworld....city-from-water

.

you don't seem to have gotten the point of the post, that water flowing through rock generates an electromagnetic charge, which you doubt.

but unfortunately for you- it does.

.

Since you think that electromagnetic fields are different from magnetic fields,

.

no.

you asked me if i knew how a compass worked.

which i do.

but you seem to be fixated on the whole magnetic/electromagnetic thing, so let me explain the difference.

an electromagnet needs an electric current to work- the clue is in the name- a magnet does not.

please. show me a magnet, that's NOT an electromagnet, that can be switched on and off.

.

so you probably have no clue how little current 1,500 nanoamps is. You actually have larger currents flowing in your brain while you read this text, yet somehow you think such currents are detectable through a hundred feet of dirt. What a different world this would be if that were true.

.

you've gleaned that figure from one test.

hardly scientific.

underneath the river thames is an identical river, with the same amount of waterflow.

are you seriously going to tell me that the electricity generated there is anything like 1500na?

that's the trouble with only using one source of information-

it's not enough to conclusively prove a point.

.

And, no, hydrogeologists (the people who locate wells) do not search for water with magnetic detectors.

.

really?

archeologists, geologists, and hydrogeologists use magnetic resistance equipment to look for features beneath the surface.

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-surface_geophysics

.

They look for underground faults that direct and trap water. Perhaps you misunderstood what they were doing with their equipment.

.

not in the slightest.

perhaps you're unaware of differing methods than the one you stated...?

.

All of your claims have been made out of complete ignorance of laws about electricity and magnetism which have been understood for over 150 years.

.

wrong.

again.

have your posts been made under the influence of too much caffeine?

or just a lack of source material.

.

Edited by shrooma
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