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1/3 of Alzheimer's cases are preventable

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LONDON, July 14 (UPI) --Basic lifestyle and behavioral changes could prevent or at least significantly delay an Alzheimer's diagnosis, according to a new study by health researchers at the University of Cambridge, in England.

In surveying previous Alzheimer's literature and analyzing compiled health records, researchers isolated and emphasized seven risk factors most associated with Alzheimer's, including: diabetes, midlife hypertension, midlife obesity, physical inactivity, depression, smoking, and low educational attainment.

By addressing these risk factors, the medical researchers say, roughly a third of all Alzheimer's cases could be prevented.

It looks like Russel was a little more right when he said that most people rather die than think....

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Posted (edited)

My mother had Alzheimer's disease.

She was never diabetic, didn't have hypertension until her late 70s, wasn't overweight, was active and college educated. The only factors I can see are that she smoked and drank (as did most of her generation). I'm not sure about this premise and claims (that 33% can be prevented). It would be nice to think this is valid and we have an element of control. However, I'm not yet convinced.

Many claims are made regarding Alzheimer's disease and the sad truth is that it's not a well understood disease.

Edited by Lilly
grammar
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My mother had Alzheimer's disease.

She was never diabetic, didn't have hypertension until her late 70s, wasn't overweight, was active and college educated. The only factors I can see are that she smoked and drank (as did most of her generation). I'm not sure about this premise and claims (that 33% can be prevented). It would be nice to think this is valid and we have an element of control. However, I'm not yet convinced.

Many claims are made regarding Alzheimer's disease and the sad truth is that it's not a well understood disease.

Hi Lilly, My mother also had this dreadfull affliction , and it took 7 yrs for her to eventually pass on, everyone loved her and as far as I'm aware she had no enemies but was kindness itself.
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Yeah, it's a horrible disease. By the time my mother passed she didn't even know me or her grandchildren. So very, very sad. I'm really hoping that I don't suffer a similar fate....I'd rather die in pain than to lose my mind.

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Yes, had the same experience with my mother, I always thought of it as a double bereavement - when the person you know disappears into their memories and you cease to exist, then the final passing...

My mother didn't have any of the stated factors prior to the steady onset of dementia/Alzheimers. Not sure why education attainment has been highlighted; educational attainment is generational, my parents didn't have the opportunity for extended education - they were in work at 14.

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The problem with studies like this is that its impossible to know when Alzheimer's was "prevented". Life has no control group.

So a third of people walking around could of "prevented" getting it by their lifestyle choice but we would never be able to know

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The problem with studies like this is that its impossible to know when Alzheimer's was "prevented". Life has no control group.

So a third of people walking around could of "prevented" getting it by their lifestyle choice but we would never be able to know

You cannot prevent something that Medical Science doesn't know enough about, they are still learning after 50 years, once again the problem is funding the research, the same as a lot of diseases,cancer being the main one ,but there is also Multiple Scerosis , Motor Nuerone, etc. If the Gov't would get their fingers out and divert funds from war zones to medical research, maybe we would get answers to beating these diseases. That is not going to happen as war is more important than disease research as far as Politicians think.
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Yes, had the same experience with my mother, I always thought of it as a double bereavement - when the person you know disappears into their memories and you cease to exist, then the final passing...

My mother didn't have any of the stated factors prior to the steady onset of dementia/Alzheimers. Not sure why education attainment has been highlighted; educational attainment is generational, my parents didn't have the opportunity for extended education - they were in work at 14.

Before we get that wrong, I had a close look at the study claiming that Alzheimers and studying are exclusive, they don't mean getting a PhD 40 years ago, they claim that it is continued learning your life long.

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If the Gov't would get their fingers out and divert funds from war zones to medical research, maybe we would get answers to beating these diseases. That is not going to happen as war is more important than disease research as far as Politicians think.

.

just thought i'd repost that sentiment.

it was worth it.

.

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