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trancelikestate

Tyrannosaurs prowled in packs

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Posted (edited)

It would have been terrifying to run into a tyrannosaur like Albertosaurus. The massive creature that roamed western North America about 70 million years ago was as long as a bus, with a wide smile of razor-sharp teeth and claws to match. But here's the worst part — it probably wasn't alone.

Tyrannosaurs, it seemed, travelled in packs.

Scientists came to that conclusion after carefully analyzing an extremely rare find — three sets of tyrannosaur tracks found in northeastern B.C.

Tyrannosaur tracks are so rare that this is the first time more than a single print has ever been found in one place.

That made the discovery exciting to begin with, since it allows paleontologists to see how the animal walked, said Richard McCrea, lead author of a new study in the journal PLOS ONE describing the tracks.

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Edited by trancelikestate
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I believe it was known for a while now that T Rex may have hunted in packs. Still it would be scary being attacked by a group of them.

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Ya it was a common theory but this finding confirms it.

How terrifying that must have been. I would love to see a video of them taking down some kind of bronteosaur. With David Attenborough narrating of course

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Posted (edited)

You would not be afraid very long, then snap! I would love to (safely) see an actual T Dragon. Bring on the Clones.

Edited by maximusnow
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Three sets of tracks found hardly proves that they hunted in packs, they could have separately been following the scent of a wounded animal/lizard, or off to a picnic.

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Posted (edited)

I always thought they did. They're just scaled up velociraptors. Besides, in their four year growth stages they filled ecological niches that species of different sized mammals fill today.Their prey was species of saurischian and ornithischian dinosaurs in all the different sizes of their own short growth stages.

Edited by John Wesley Boyd

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Of course they hunted in packs. How else would they fight teepee building Sasquatch? This is British Columbia we are talking about. But yea I watched a documentary somewhere last year they were talking about t-rex hunting in packs.

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Would be awesome to witness a pack of Rexxes clicking and whistling back and forth while they ambushed their prey

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Ya it was a common theory but this finding confirms it.

I would love to see a video of them taking down some kind of bronteosaur. With David Attenborough narrating of course

.

of course.

who else?!

.

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They're just scaled up velociraptors.

.

scaled up?!

Velociraptors were the size of CHICKENS!

.

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Posted (edited)

.

scaled up?!

Velociraptors were the size of CHICKENS!

.

They come in all sizes.

Dromaeosaurids were small to medium-sized dinosaurs, ranging from about 0.7 metres (2.3 ft) in length (in the case of Mahakala) to over 6 metres (20 ft) (in Utahraptor and Achillobator).[16][17] Some may have grown larger; undescribed specimens of Utahraptor in Brigham Young University collections belonged to individuals that may have reached up to 11 m (36 ft) long, though these await more detailed study.[18] Large size appears to have evolved at least twice among dromaeosaurids; once among the dromaeosaurines Utahraptor and Achillobator, and again among the unenlagiines (Austroraptor, which measured 5 metres (16 ft) long). A possible third lineage of giant dromaeosaurs is represented by isolated teeth found on the Isle of Wight, England. The teeth belong to an animal the size of the dromaeosaurine Utahraptor, but they appear to belong to velociraptorines, judging by the shape of the teeth.[19]

Mahakala is both the most primitive dromaeosaurid ever described and the smallest. This evidence, combined with the small size of other primitive relatives such as Microraptor and the troodontid Anchiornis, indicates that the common ancestor of dromaeosaurids, troodontids, and birds (which is called the ancestral paravian) may have been very small, at around 65 cm in length and 600 to 700 grams of mass.[20]

Edited by John Wesley Boyd
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Hmm I dont know but footprints can be from a path where allot of T-Rexes passed. But that doesnt mean they passed there in packs. It is equally possible there is allot of time between the prints made. Mud doesnt turn into stone over night.

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