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Man-made 'breathing' leaf developed

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The invention is able to convert water and sunlight in to oxygen the same way as a real leaf does.

Created by Royal College of Art graduate Julian Melchiorri, the remarkable new leaf consists of chloroplasts, where photosynthesis occurs, suspended in a silk protein body.

Read More: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/270100/man-made-breathing-leaf-developed

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Astronauts dressed up as leafs, suppose it could work.

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Posted (edited)

What an invention - the next holy-grail in technology bio-mechanism/ tech!

Bet this will go underground and wont hear anything thing on it for decades!!! Would love to follow this and it's development.

Edited by Myster0n

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Posted (edited)

We need to see if this some semi-porous building material or coating. That way when it rains, the buildings can put oxygen back into the air. May help with the air pollution in major cities.

Corrected typo.

Edited by paperdyer
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I would wrap my whole house in a membrane of this stuff. So cool

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The article doesn't mention but... do we need real leaves to produce the man-made leaves? How the organelles (chloroplasts) were obtained by the inventor?

Another point: The article suggests that it should be applied to facades of buildings and lampshades, but for how long a chloroplast live outside a plant cell (even inside one)?

I think that there is a looooong road ahead, but at least we are starting to walk toward something very useful for mankind.

Regards.

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What is not mentioned is whether or not it could cope with the Solar Radiation if it is deployed outside a human habitat. Within a human habitat you would have to carefully regulate its output so that the level of oxygen produced does not poison the entire crew.

Is this simply another means of producing oxygen from Water? If so then the technology is already in place.

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The article doesn't mention but... do we need real leaves to produce the man-made leaves? How the organelles (chloroplasts) were obtained by the inventor?

Another point: The article suggests that it should be applied to facades of buildings and lampshades, but for how long a chloroplast live outside a plant cell (even inside one)?

I think that there is a looooong road ahead, but at least we are starting to walk toward something very useful for mankind.

Regards.

There's also the small bit that photosynthesis needs water to happen. H2O is required to make the O ...

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A real leaf doesn't make oxygen it makes singer from co2 and sunlight, o2 is a waste product. When his leaf can make sugrr then I'll be impressed.

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Is this an experiment to make new fabrics? If so then if would help to ventilate rooms.

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Is this an experiment to make new fabrics? If so then if would help to ventilate rooms.

Notably public bathrooms.

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This is a big WTF!

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