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Still Waters

[Merged] 'See-through' bodies technique developed

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A way to turn an entire body transparent has been developed by scientists studying rodents.

Reporting in the journal Cell, they describe a technique that keeps tissues intact but allows key body parts and connections to be seen.

They say it could help visualise how separate organs interact and pave the way for a new generation of treatments.

http://www.bbc.co.uk...health-28582452

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Thats pretty weird :unsure2:

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Only thing i think of is about how much pain do those rodents have to endure before they die...

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To me it's only cruel and I seriously doubt it will pave to anything new.

Unfortunately I'm not a researcher, so maybe I'm wrong. But it's cruel for sure.

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That's a cool idea. To actually be able to SEE the changes in cells between healthy and diseased states, or where viruses hide in tissue. I can see it eventually being really beneficial.

I would like to point this out though:

The research has been carried out on euthansed rats and human tissue samples taken during operations but not yet in living organisms.

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A mouse body has been transformed into a pale, gooey-lookin ag "see-through" version of its former self, by researchers wielding a new technique they say could be used to better understand processes in the body.

The technique — which is performed on mice, postmortem, can reveal all of an animal's organs, from its brain to its kidneys, while keeping them intact — could lead to a better understanding of how the brain and body interact, as well as new ways to treat conditions such as chronic pain and autism, according to a study published today (July 31) in the journal Cell.

~

Hmmmmm ...

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