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Did prehistoric worms save the world ?

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Burrowing worms may have had a profound impact on the development of life over 500 million years ago.

Modern humans and other complex life forms may never have existed at all if it hadn't been for a specific series of circumstances hundreds of millions of years ago that helped regulate the concentration of oxygen in the world's oceans.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...-save-the-world

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Posted (edited)

I think there is something wrong in the statement; it should have been bacteria have started releasing oxygen while consuming phosphates and nitrates. This bacteria is still present in modern times, called cyanobacteria

From wiki

By producing oxygen as a gas as a by-product of photosynthesis, cyanobacteria are thought to have converted the early reducing atmosphere into an oxidizing one, which dramatically changed the composition of life forms on Earth by stimulating biodiversity and leading to the near-extinction of oxygen-intolerant organisms. According to endosymbiotic theory, the chloroplasts found in plants and eukaryotic algae evolved from cyanobacterial ancestors via endosymbiosis.

Edited by qxcontinuum

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Bless the Maker and His water.

Bless the coming and going of Him.

May His passage cleanse the world.

May He keep the world for His people

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Actually, this makes a lot of sense... I wonder if they're still helping with this even today.

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Never underestimate the usefulness of the little guys. Neat article.

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Unfortunately I an not a bacteria and my gas may not incite life as we know it

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