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A self-organizing thousand-robot swarm

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''The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Just as trillions of individual cells can assemble into an intelligent organism, or a thousand starlings can form a great flowing murmuration across the sky, the Kilobots demonstrate how complexity can arise from very simple behaviors performed en masse. To computer scientists, they also represent a significant milestone in the development of collective artificial intelligence...''

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/08/140814191818.htm

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I envision the day when these become useful for biological control of pest plants. Imagine an army of these programed to identify a highly invasive species like Kudzu, armed with tiny pincers that would swarm over the vine and continually cut it off at the ground until it can no longer regenerate. The robots could return to a charging station every night at which time their programing is checked and updated to make sure they don't harm desirable species, and they can be relocated when an area is cleared. This would be extremely useful on invasive species where no safe biological control has been found.

Edited by Sundew

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I envision the day when these become useful for biological control of pest plants. Imagine an army of these programed to identify a highly invasive species like Kudzu, armed with tiny pincers that would swarm over the vine and continually cut it off at the ground until it can no longer regenerate. The robots could return to a charging station every night at which time their programing is checked and updated to make sure they don't harm desirable species, and they can be relocated when an area is cleared. This would be extremely useful on invasive species where no safe biological control has been found.

I envision a use for these as nanobots that are able to automatically reconstruct damaged artificial bodies (like vehicles) or integrate with biology (like prosthetics)

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I envision a use for these as nanobots that are able to automatically reconstruct damaged artificial bodies (like vehicles) or integrate with biology (like prosthetics)

Yes and possibly replace organ donars.

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